caribbeanclimate

Home » Posts tagged 'Least Developed Countries (LDCs)'

Tag Archives: Least Developed Countries (LDCs)

Caribbean at Annual Meeting of the AMS

Dr Leonard Nurse, Chairman of the Board and Mr Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) attended the 99th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in their personal capacities. Other participants from the Caribbean at the meeting held in Phoenix, Arizona, USA from 6 to 10 January 2019 included Dr David Farrell, Principal of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), Mr Glendell de Souza, Deputy Coordinating Director of the Caribbean Meteorological Organization (CMO) and representatives of the national Meteorological Services of the Antigua and Barbuda, Guyana and Suriname.

There were several presentations by scientists from the CIMH. Shawn Boyce presented on “Impact-Based Forecasting and Assessment in the Caribbean”.  Lawrence Pologne delivered a presentation on “The Potential, Viability and Co-benefits of Developing Wind Energy to Mitigate Climate Change in the Caribbean” based on his University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill doctoral thesis. Branden Spooner, an Intern at CIMH, presented on “Using Virtual Reality Technology as a Tool in Disaster Risk Reduction”.

There were several presentations of interest to the region. Kristie Ebi delivered on “Building Resilience of Health Systems in Pacific Island Least Developed Countries”. She also worked with Cory Morin of the University of Washington who delivered a presentation on, “Use of Seasonal Climate Forecasts to Develop an Early-Warning System for Dengue Fever Risk in Central America and the Caribbean”. They expressed an interest with collaborating with the CCCCC in developing this warning system.

The CIMH, and the national Meteorological Services of Belize and Jamaica were used in Catherine Vaughan’s, “Evaluation of Regional Climate Services: Learning from Seasonal Scale Examples across the Americas”. She is working out of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Colombia University.

Belize may find the presentation by Jorge Tamayo of the State Meteorological Agency, Spain, on “New Projects on Iberoamerican Meteorological Cooperation” of special interest. One project is on the development of a lightening detection network for Central America. They are also collaborating with the Regional Committee of Hydrological Services (CRRH) and the Central American Integration System (SICA) on a meeting in 2019 on the delivery of climate services.

In an interesting session on Communicating Climate Change, Mike Nelson of KMGH-TV in Denver Colorado, presented on “Communicating Climate Change – Be the Expert in the Living Room”, and Hank Jenkins-Smith of the University of Oklahoma delivered a presentation on “Stability and Instability in Individual Beliefs about Climate Change”. Jenkins-Smith noted that based on polling trends, conservatives were more likely to change their beliefs on climate change while liberals were more likely to retain their opinions on climate change.

In a session on Climate Extremes in the Tropical Americas: Past, Present and Future, Derek Thompson of Louisiana State University (LSU) presented on “Spatiotemporal Patterns and Recurrence Intervals of Tropical Cyclone Strikes for the Caribbean Islands from 1901 to 2017”, and Prashant Sardeshmukh, CIRES presented on “Can We Trust Model Projections of Changes in Climate Extremes over the Tropical Americas?”. He noted that dynamics played a more important role than atmospheric temperature in explaining extreme weather events. Current climate models were not capturing this aspect accurately and more work was required in this area. Kristine DeLong of LSU presented her work on “Last Interglacial Sea Surface Temperature Variability in the Tropical Atlantic Warm Pool: A Comparison of Model and Coral-Based Reconstructions”, which focused mainly on paleoclimatic reconstructions based on coral samples in the Caribbean. She noted the importance of collaboration with Caribbean institutions.

The 100th AMS Meeting will be held in Boson, Massachusetts from 12 to 16 January 2020. Caribbean meteorologists, hydrologists and climate change experts are encouraged to attend these meetings to be appraised of the most recent research on these subjects.

IMPACT Inception Workshop hosted in Kingston

Participants of IMPACT Regional Inception Workshop

Press Release – Belmopan, Belize; April 3, 2017 – The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is organizing a regional climate change workshop at the Knutsford Court Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica from April 3 – 5, 2017.

The IMPACT Regional Inception Workshop marks the launch of a four (4) year project in the Caribbean that will support Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries (LDCs) around the world. IMPACT will strengthen the connections between the scientific assessments of climate impacts, vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation to help access the financial and technical resources required to implement concrete projects.

IMPACT is being implemented by Climate Analytics gGmbh. Collaborating institutions include Climate Analytics Lome (Togo), Charles and Associates (Grenada), the Secretariat of the Pacific Environment Programme (SPREP), the Potsdam Institute for Climate (PIK), and the CCCCC. The project is funded by the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany.

The project will also enhance the capacity of CARICOM Member States and other SIDS and LDCs to engage effectively in and contribute substantially to the international climate change negotiations under the United Nations and in particular to the elaboration of the mechanisms and processes established under the Paris Agreement. SIDS and LDCs played a pivotal role in the negotiation of the Paris Agreement in 2015 and ensured that the interests of the Caribbean were secured in the Agreement.

Participants in the IMPACT Regional Inception Workshop include representatives of the climate change offices of the CARICOM Member States, the Climate Studies Group of the University of the West Indies, Mona, the University of the Bahamas, Charles and Associates of Grenada, the CCCCC and Climate Analytics.

Peruse IMPACT_short description

______________________________________________________________________­_

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change. We maintain the Caribbean’s most extensive repository of information and data on climate change specific to the region, which in part enables us to provide climate change-related policy advice and guidelines to CARICOM member states through the CARICOM Secretariat. In this role, the Centre is recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Environment Programme, and other international agencies as the focal point for climate change issues in the Caribbean. The Centre is also a United Nations Institute for Training and Research recognised Centre of Excellence, one of an elite few. Learn more about how we’re working to make the Caribbean more climate resilient by perusing The Implementation Plan.

###

Call for Submissions – GCCA+ Global Learning Event (GLE)

 

The European Commission announces its 3rd Global Event ‘Innovative and effective approaches to climate change adaptation and other post COP21 agreement priorities’, to be held, on 12-13-14 September 2016 in Brussels, Belgium.

The Agenda 2030 with the SDGs and the COP21 Paris Agreement on climate change provide a new strategic framework for international cooperation. Consequently, the GCCA+ plans to contribute strategically, financially and technically, over the period 2016-2020, to the efforts of LDCs and SIDS parties to address these challenges.

A year after the launch of the GCCA+, and as experiences from the GCCA, other programmes and the recent COP21 Paris Agreement accumulate across the globe, it is important that the GCCA+ ensures that lesson learning is an integral part of the development process and that knowledge generated from its implementation is shared across countries and regions and with key stakeholders and development partners. The GCCA+ Global Learning Event will explore how experience on the ground influences policy development and vice-versa on local, national and international scales.

The aim of the GCCA+ GLE2016 will be to share past GCCA and current GCCA+ best practices and challenges to scaling-up and increasing impacts amongst beneficiaries and potential donors;to present recent and updated climate strategies and examples across various development sectors and actors such as on INDCs, NAPs, engagement with new stakeholders, new tools and approaches and to extract conclusions for the GCCA+.

The GCCA+ GLE2016 will discuss more specifically the following four topics:

  1. How could the INDCs be effectively linked to the other climate change policy processes (e.g., NAPA, NAPs, National Communications)?
  2. How to increase the social benefits of climate change policies and interventions (e.g. Number of beneficiaries, dissemination of best practices, etc.)?
  3. Linking gender, poverty and climate change mainstreaming – challenges and opportunities.
  4. Risk management solutions and tools (climate models, risk assessments, insurance schemes, adapted technologies, etc.) as a response to the adverse effects of climate change.

European Delegation representatives, implementing partners, governmental bodies, non-state actors from academia, NGOs and the private sector working in the GCCA+ targeted countries with direct applied knowledge are all invited to submit proposals strictly focusing on these four topics and reporting practical experiences or studies showing the path towards a successful implementation of the Paris Agreement on these matters in Less Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

The submissions can be presented in multiples forms and media such as papers, posters, presentations, videos, etc. All submissions should include the following information as a common basis for selection: Clear title; Geographical scope (regional, national, sub-national); Sector(s); Stakeholder(s) involved; Result(s); Lesson(s) learnt.

Submissions will be judged on the following criteria: (1.) relevance to one or more of the four topics; (2.) contribution to the implementation of the Paris Agreement; (3.) potential for duplication, scaling up and impact, and (4.) innovative power of idea, relevance of area, and potential for impact.

Accepted submissions will be presented at one of the thematic sessions on day 1 and day 2 or during the open space session of day 3 (1/2 day). These submissions as well as others of value to the GCCA+ and that would not have been presented will also feature in the GLE2016 publication.

The key dates are as follows:

  • Deadline for submission of concept (one pager): 15th June 2016
  • Notification to selected submissions: 30th June 2016
  • Deadline for submission of full paper/poster/presentation/video/etc.: 31st July 2016
  • Deadline for the submission of revised paper/poster/presentation/video/etcS.: 31st August 2016.

Interested parties are asked to submit a proposal addressing one or more of the four topics selected for the GLE2016 and to  submit proposals by the 15th of June 2016, by emailing: info@gcca.eu

Credit: http://www.gcca.eu/

GCF signs grant agreement with Guyana and CARICOM in Paris

header-GuyanaGrantAgreement

Guyana signed a readiness grant agreement with the Green Climate Fund (GCF) at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP) in Paris on Tuesday, December 08, 2015. The funding will provide USD 300,000 to Guyana to help the country build capacity to access GCF funding for its priority projects in the future.

This project, which was negotiated between the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC or 5C) and the Ministry for the Environment, Land and Sea of Italy, aims to address several issues affecting CARICOM States under the rubric of Climate Change, inclusive of mitigation, adaptation and vulnerability.  The 5Cs is an Accredited Entity (AE) to the Fund, meaning that it can partner with GCF in delivering mitigation and adaptation projects on the ground in the Caribbean.

Executive Director of the 5Cs, Dr. Kenrick Leslie attended the ceremony along with H.E. Raphael Trotman, Minister of Governance of the Department of Natural Resources and Environment, who signed on behalf of Guyana in the presence of H.E. Winston Jordan, the Guyanese Minister of Finance. Ousseynou Nakoulima, Director of Country Programming, signed on behalf of the Fund.

The GCF aims to help CARICOM Member States to adapt to climate change, by lessening their vulnerability to sea level rise and climate variability; identifying and implementing the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs); reporting and assessing of the Member States INDCs and the development and dissemination of renewable energy sources and technology.

According to iNews Guyana, “Francesco La Camera, Director General of the Ministry of Environment of Italy, signed a €6 million project to assist CARICOM Member States to mitigate climate variability and change.”

The GCF also seeks to transfer scientific and technical knowledge, experiences and technology, facilitate the exchange of experts, scientists and researchers; enhance the capacities for the implementation of mechanisms under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its related instruments, and to promote joint ventures between the private sectors of the Parties.

The Fund provides early support for readiness and preparatory activities to enhance country ownership and access through its country readiness programme. A minimum of 50 per cent of readiness support is targeted at Small Island Developing States (SIDS) such as Guyana, Least Developed Countries (LDCs), and African States.

More than 95 countries have so far expressed interest in receiving readiness support from the Fund, and more than 30 such grants have been approved to date.

The estimated timeframe for the project is five years. Minister Trotman thanked the Government and People of Italy for their continued support and friendship shown towards the people of Guyana and the Caribbean.

Credit: iNews Guyana, Green Climate Fund
%d bloggers like this: