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Project Preparation Partnership Launched to Support Latin America and Caribbean National Institutions Improve Capacity for Developing Climate Resilient Water Projects for the Green Climate Fund

PRESS RELEASE

Panama City, Panama, September 5th, 2019:

A Technical Workshop on Project Preparation for Transformational Climate Resilient Water Project Concepts in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) for the Green Climate Fund (GCF), was held with 95 participants  – comprised of GCF National Designated Authorities (NDAs), GCF Direct Access Entities (DAEs), representatives from Water Ministries and agencies, as well as academia – from 23 LAC countries.

The workshop was organised by the Global Water Partnership (GWP), in collaboration with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), with technical inputs from the GCF Secretariat and the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO).

Group Photo 2

Group photo of participants 

The workshop responded to countries’ needs for support to strengthen the capacity of NDAs, DAEs, and Water Ministries and agencies to prepare climate resilient water projects that meet GCF investment criteria. Participants reviewed the GCF funding requirements and mandate, investment criteria, and its operational modalities and procedures for delivering climate finance through different windows. They also considered fit-for-purpose examples of project design and financing instruments. Countries shared their experiences and lessons in accessing GCF resources. Through interactive, hands-on exercises over three days, NDAs, DAEs, and water professionals and decision-makers, worked on 36 country-prioritised water project ideas to sharpen their climate rationale and paradigm shift potential.

The workshop is a flagship initiative that is driven by a collaboration of three GWP regions – Central America, South America and the Caribbean – in accelerating climate action via water, as per the GWP 2020-2025 Strategy. Additionally, the workshop served as a pivotal milestone to launch the Project Preparation Partnership for Climate Resilient Water Projects in LAC for the GCF, between GWP, IDB and the CCCCC. It will provide a platform for countries to continue exchanging knowledge and lessons, as their experience in preparing, financing, and implementing water projects, grows within the context of the GCF.

Co-organisers and participants of the workshop, and other relevant sector entities, are invited to join the Partnership and benefit from it. The Partnership provides a structured resource for LAC countries to continue accessing strategic and technical support to prioritise and prepare climate resilient water projects via a facilitated, flexible mechanism that enables demand-driven technical assistance for NDAs, DAEs, and national water agencies.

According to a 2016 UNFCCC survey of country climate action priorities, water is the most-cited pathway through which countries experience climate impacts and also the most-often prioritised sector through which countries seek to build resilience in their economies, their inhabitants’ livelihoods, and their natural ecosystems.

But when it comes to preparing and implementing adaptation projects, few of these water actions shift from priority lists to action on the ground. Barriers cited by countries include capacity limitations within countries, and weak coordination among in-country entities including Ministries of Water, Ministries of Planning, and Ministries of Finance.

The Partnership is committed to continue the momentum generated from this workshop, with NDAs, DAEs, and ministries supporting one another to overcome barriers, drawing on the increasing expertise across the continent. Furthermore, recognising aspects of water projects that deliver development benefits that do not directly address climate impacts, require co-financing from other sources such as governments or the private sector. The Partnership will work with active and relevant financing partners for project preparation to appropriately structure financing for climate resilient GCF water projects in Latin America and the Caribbean.

 About the IDB

We work to improve lives in Latin America and the Caribbean. Through financial and technical support for countries working to reduce poverty and inequality, we help improve health and education, and advance infrastructure. Our aim is to achieve development in a sustainable, climate-friendly way. With a history dating back to 1959, today we are the leading source of development financing for Latin America and the Caribbean. We provide loans, grants, and technical assistance; and we conduct extensive research. We maintain a strong commitment to achieving measurable results and the highest standards of integrity, transparency, and accountability.

About CCCCC

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the Caribbean region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and on the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change in the Caribbean.

 About GWP

The Global Water Partnership (GWP) is a global action network with over 3,000 Partner organisations in 183 countries. GWP’s vision is a water secure world. Our mission is to advance governance and management of water resources for sustainable and equitable development.

A blue urban agenda: adapting to climate change in the coastal cities of Caribbean and Pacific small island developing states

Cities in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have leveraged nearly US$800 million in green climate funding to support coastal resilience, says a new Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) report.

The study, A Blue Urban Agenda: Adapting to Climate Change in the Coastal Cities of Caribbean and Pacific Small Island Developing States, estimates that 4.2 million people in SIDS in the Caribbean and in the Pacific are living in areas that are prone to flooding due to rising sea levels. As a result the region has now become a reference for other port cities.

“Mayors in port cities across the globe should be cognisant of the enormous economic costs and implications of sea level rise, hurricanes and coastal storms to port infrastructure,” Michelle Mycoo, co-author of the report, told Cities Today. “Mayors will need to consider a mix of strategies such as higher investments in robust coastal defences, alternative future upgrading and expansion plans such as retreating from the coast and relocation of storage areas for container cargo further inland.”

The international community has responded by providing US$55.6 billion in aid and private sector flows to Caribbean and Pacific SIDS over the last 20 years. These programmes have included coastal engineering to protect cities from flooding and coastal erosion, wetland restoration, coral reef conservation and watershed rehabilitation, urban planning and the enforcement of coastal setbacks and flood-resistant building codes.

“The urban planning profession clearly needs to pursue a Blue Urban Agenda and build cities that respond to their shores and the needs of coastal residents,” said Michael Donovan, co-author and Housing & Urban Development Senior Specialist, IDB.

The study reviewed 50 projects financed by the IDB, World Bank, Asian Development Bank and others, and the efforts made by Caribbean and Pacific SIDS to implement adaptation strategies aimed at reducing vulnerability and enhancing sustainability. It shows an increasing emphasis on urban governance and institutional capacity building within city planning agencies.

It includes several policy recommendations for cities, including improving coastal planning, land reclamation, coastal setbacks, enforcement of building codes, climate-proofing infrastructure, mangrove reforestation, and coastal surveying and monitoring.

“Adapting and improving the resilience of cities in coastal zones of SIDS, especially those experiencing rapid urbanisation, remains critical,” added Donovan. “Caribbean and Pacific coastal cities are on the front lines of the response to climate change and are pioneering innovative approaches to respond to coastal transformation. All eyes are on these islands as port cities across the world look for answers to the coastal question.”

Credit: Cities Today

Caribbean Urban Forum to Enhance Regional Urban Planning

The Belize City Council partnered with the Belize Association of Planners and the Caribbean Network for Urban Land Management to host the seventh annual Caribbean Urban Forum (CUF 7) in Belize City at the Radisson Fort George Hotel, on May 17th – 19th, 2017.

The Caribbean Urban Forum (CUF) is designed to address specific policy issues within the Caribbean urban sector by bringing together land use practitioners, policy makers, academics and allied professionals interested in enhancing urban planning and management in the Region.

Students of Wesley College and Bernice Yorke Institute of Learning

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) was invited to participate in the Urban Expo, scheduled for days two and three, May 18th & 19th, of the CUF at the Memorial Park in Belize City, under the theme ‘Green Economy, Energy and Space-Pathways to Urban Sustainability.

(L-R) Troy Smith, Valuations Manager, Belize City Council; Michael Theus, Councilor for Economic Development; Darrell Bradley, Mayor of Belize City; Ralston Frazer, Deputy Mayor of Belmopan City and Dr. Cassandra Rogers, Country Representation, Inter-American Development Bank

Dr. Cassandra Rogers, Country Representative of the Inter-American Development Bank, expressed her desire to see “cities growing in a very smart and sustainable way.”

Dr. Cassandra Rogers, Country Representative, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

“The Belize City Council and IDB’s Action Plan involves critical investments to solve some of the development issues that were identified in the vulnerability studies. [We are planning] sustainable cities that are resilient to natural disasters and climate change”, states Dr. Rogers.

Deputy Mayor of Belmopan City, Ralston Frazer, encouraged all in attendance to work together and join the group that is not doing the talking but doing the work.

Ralston Frazer, Deputy Mayor of Belmopan City

He stated, “We have the responsibility to make this place as beautiful as we can make it in, so that we can have appreciation for it. Urban planners make cities beautiful and orderly.”

Mayor Darrell Bradley of Belize City emphasized that with the right partnerships, we can build the kind of communities that we want to see.

Mayor Darrell Bradley, Belize City Council

“Urban planning is a means of promoting cities that offers opportunities at the highest level… Climate change is the reason our lands are eroding, climate change is the reason our sea does the abundance of marine life it once had. We want to build a Belize that fosters sustainable growth and develop and one resilient to climate change.”

Peruse photo album of the Caribbean Urban Forum’s Expo here:

 

The seventh annual Caribbean Urban Forum (CUF 7)

CDEMA and IDEA International Awarded Silver Medal for Collaborative Project in Management for Development Results

 The Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) is the recipient of a Silver Medal award which is shared with the Institute for Development in Economics and Administration (IDEA International). The award was sponsored by the International Development Bank (IDB) and presented during the IX International Seminar of the Sub-National Governments Network (CoPLAC) held in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico on September 8th, 2016. Both entities were nominated for the ‘Second Competition in Management for Development Results (MfDR)’ and were placed second in the ‘MfDR in Sectors’ category.

From L-R is Dr. Frederic Martin, Co-President of IDEA and Mr. Ronald Jackson, Executive Director of CDEMA with other awardees.

From L-R is Dr. Frederic Martin, Co-President of IDEA and Mr. Ronald Jackson, Executive Director of CDEMA with other awardees.

The Executive Director of CDEMA, Ronald Jackson, and the Co-President of IDEA, Frederic Martin, expressed their gratitude for the recognition. Dr. Martin said he was particularly “pleased that the CoPLAC Evaluation Committee had recognized this example of good practices in MfDR in the Caribbean region conducted with limited human and financial resources, as well as of the originality of the institutional setup based on North-South collaboration and public-private partnership”. Mr Jackson also commended the organizers and sponsors of the award and offered assurance that “CDEMA remains committed to strengthening its accountability to stakeholders through monitoring, evaluation and reporting (MER) for both, its internal work and external partners’ work”.

“Being awarded this Silver Medal on the occasion of celebrating our Silver Anniversary is highly commendable and speaks to the growth of the Agency over the past 25 years in ensuring that M&E is highly featured in our efforts to be accountable to our Participating States and stakeholders as we report on progress towards the achievement of the Regional Comprehensive Disaster Management (CDM) Strategy 2014-2024 and the CDEMA Coordinating Unit (CU) Corporate Plan 2014-2017”, said Mr. Jackson.

In 2013, the CDEMA CU contracted the IDEA International Institute to provide support to strengthening the MER capacity of the Agency to lead the CDM agenda for the region. The project undertaken by IDEA started with a series of training in Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) of a critical mass of key actors, both at CDEMA CU and in major National Disaster Offices. Twenty one participants achieved the Masters Certification Programme in M&E and Information Systems, a graduate level credited programme offered jointly by IDEA International and University Laval, Canada.

Further work on the M&E system involved the revision of the strategic and operational plans, adjusting when necessary the choice of indicators in the Performance Measurement Framework, and checking for the consistency of targets set at strategic, programmatic, and operational levels over the planning horizon of the CDM Strategy. The development of such a robust system also includes efforts to strengthen M&E at the level of the National Disaster Management Organizations. And finally, the initiative was accompanied by the design and implementation of an online monitoring system, which started with a diagnostic of needs and of relevant existing information systems, and then included the adaptation of the generic IDEA Solutions “Monitoring for Results” (M4R) software to the specific needs and characteristics of CDEMA to develop a tailor-made solution, which is currently functional as CDM Monitor.

Based on the support given by IDEA, the CDEMA CU has seen an improvement over the last 3 years in its internal systems in terms of monitoring and reporting of results. The CU is also providing support to the Participating States and to stakeholders within the CDM Governance Mechanism in order to improve the level of reporting on progress of implementation of the CDM Strategy.

Participating States:

Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St. Vincent and Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, Virgin Islands

 

US$ 7.2 Million to Boost Climate Change Resilience

Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Daryl Vaz (standing, left) and General Manager, Country Department, Caribbean Group, Inter-American Development Bank, Therese Turner Jones (standing, right), observe as (from left) Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Audrey Sewell; Managing Director, Development Bank of Jamaica, Milverton Reynolds; General Manager, JN Small Business Loans, Gillian Hyde; and Programme Manager, Environmental Foundation of Jamaica (EFJ), Allison Rangolan McFarlane sign the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the Adaptation Programme and Financing Mechanism Project at Jamaica House, in St. Andrew, on July 28. Under the initiative, US$7.2 million will be made available to micro, small and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs) in the tourism and agricultural sectors to finance climate-change adaptation initiatives islandwide.

Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Daryl Vaz (standing, left) and General Manager, Country Department, Caribbean Group, Inter-American Development Bank, Therese Turner Jones (standing, right), observe as (from left) Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Audrey Sewell; Managing Director, Development Bank of Jamaica, Milverton Reynolds; General Manager, JN Small Business Loans, Gillian Hyde; and Programme Manager, Environmental Foundation of Jamaica (EFJ), Allison Rangolan McFarlane sign the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the Adaptation Programme and Financing Mechanism Project at Jamaica House, in St. Andrew, on July 28. Under the initiative, US$7.2 million will be made available to micro, small and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs) in the tourism and agricultural sectors to finance climate-change adaptation initiatives islandwide.

A total of US$7.2 million will be made available to micro, small and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs) in the tourism and agricultural sectors, to finance climate change adaptation initiatives islandwide.

The money, which will be in the form of loans and grants, is being provided under the Adaptation Programme and Financing Mechanism Project, a component of the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience (PPCR) in Jamaica.

The Project is a five-year initiative which aims to increase Jamaica’s resilience to climate change, through enhancing adaptive capacity across priority sectors.

This component of the PPCR is being implemented by the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, with funding from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

The initiative was formalised during a signing ceremony at Jamaica House in St. Andrew, on July 28.

The Memorandum of Understanding was signed by Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Audrey Sewell; Managing Director, Development Bank of Jamaica, Milverton Reynolds; General Manager, JN Small Business Loans, Gillian Hyde; and Programme Manager, Environmental Foundation of Jamaica (EFJ), Allison Rangolan McFarlane.

Speaking at the ceremony, Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Daryl Vaz, said the Government intends to increase its efforts to pursue long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth.

“As a Government, we have pledged to protect the environment while creating jobs to drive the engine of economic growth, and we cannot allow climate change and other environmental impacts to impede us,” he said.

The Minister thanked all the partners involved in the initiative, noting that it represents an excellent opportunity to build on the work that has already begun in fostering sustainable development through partnership.

For her part, Ms. Hyde said the new loan facility will be open to qualified MSME beneficiaries who will be eligible for a loan amount between $200,000 and $5 million.

She pointed out that the loan will be available at a maximum interest rate of four per cent per annum.

For her part, Ms. Rangolan McFarlane said the money will be accessible to community-based organisations, non-governmental organisations, other civil-society groups and selected public-sector agencies, for clearly defined high-priority activities.

She added that these should be related to building the resilience of the natural environment and contributing to livelihood protection and poverty reduction.

General Manager, Country Department, Caribbean Group, Inter-American Development Bank, Therese Turner Jones, said the initiative is another in a series of partnerships to assist in the development of the country.

“We are looking to see how this pilot is going to work, so we can think about replicating this elsewhere in the region,” she said, adding that the initiative is the first of its kind in the Caribbean.

The project involves a Climate Change Adaptation Line of Credit and a special Climate Change Adaptation Fund.

The Line of Credit will provide loan financing to help MSMEs in the tourism and agricultural sectors to adapt to the impacts of climate change.  The loans will be administered by the JN Small Business Loans Limited. The sum of US$2.5 million is being provided for this.

The Adaptation Fund will provide grants to adaptation and disaster risk reduction projects and finance the associated programme management costs.

Grants will be provided using the successful EFJ grant-making model. The EFJ will be the Fund Administrator for the US$4.7 million being provided.

Credit: Jamaica Information Service

IDB fund climate change adaptation programme in Tobago involving underwater sculptures

buccoco reef tobago

Buccoo Reef, Tobago

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has provided US$500,000 in grant financing to The Cropper Foundation in Trinidad and Tobago to implement a pilot programme utilizing underwater sculptures as a unique approach to climate change adaptation in the Buccoo Reef area.

Trinidadian artist Peter Minshall will create two Carnival-themed sculptures, part of a work known as Tobago Water Colours, in the area of Buccoo reef off Tobago, in one component of a programme on adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Buccoo Reef has been damaged by land-based nutrient run-off and years of excess visits from snorkelers and scuba divers.

The IDB-funded project is intended to provide an alternative destination for tourists that will also provide a new source of income for the tourism, cultural and creative industries of the area, while allowing Buccoo Reef to recover.

The programme will include a focus on marketing and financial sustainability for the new attraction. An additional component of the technical assistance grant will finance a study that will explore options to reduce anthropogenic pollution loading on the reef’s ecosystem.

“This may help turn the tide at Buccoo. Reflecting the colours of the reef and the movement of the sea, the installation will also be a celebration of our island and our annual Carnival, which is an ancient tradition,” Minshall said.

The IDB grant is being provided for an implementation period of 24 months and is expected to lead to a larger project entailing installation of the complete band of Carnival sculptures, following evaluation of the outcomes of the pilot programme.

The project is part of the Bank’s support for its borrowing member countries’ efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change, which will require innovative and creative financing and knowledge-based approaches.

Credit: Caribbean 360

Caribbean Water Ministers Will Address Water and Climate Issues to Help Shape the Development Agenda

In September, the United Nations will finalise a Post-2015 Development Agenda known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs follow and expand on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which expire at the end of the year and will be “the global community’s plan of action” for all dimensions of sustainable development (economic, social and environmental) for the next fifteen (15) years.

On the heels of establishing this new universal Agenda; Caribbean Ministers with responsibility for water resources management from more than ten (10) countries, will meet on August 27th and 28th, 2015 at the InterContinental Hotel in Miami, Florida to discuss critical regional water and climate issues. Both water and climate change are reflected as priorities in the soon to be confirmed SDGs, with Goal 6 being: “Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” and Goal 13 being: “Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.”

This Ministerial Meeting is the 11th Annual High Level Forum (HLF) which is being organised by the Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association (CWWA) and the Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-C) in collaboration with the Global Environment Facility – funded Caribbean Regional Fund for Wastewater Management (GEF CReW) Project. The 11th HLF which takes place under the theme “Connecting Water to Climate, Economic Growth and Development within the Post-2015 Development Agenda” forms part of the CWWA’s 24th Annual Conference and Exhibition which is being held in partnership with the Florida Section of the American Water Works Association (AWWA).

The 11th HLF takes place at an appropriate time to allow for discussion and collaboration on water and climate matters to help shape the sustainable development agenda of the region. This year’s Forum is forward-looking with a goal of producing concrete outcomes and harmonised recommendations to guide national and regional efforts in operationalising water, wastewater and climate goals and targets for sustainable development. Some outcomes of the Forum are likely to feed into the contribution to be made by Caribbean Small Island Developing States (SIDS) at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December to play a pivotal part of global processes for advancing sustainable development.

According to Dr. Douglas Slater, Assistant Secretary-General of Human and Social Development of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), who will be a keynote speaker at the 11th HLF “Climate change will continue to have serious implications for water resources in the region,” linking the two critical issues. He has also stated that partnership remains one of the means of implementation needed to achieve sustainable water development goals. In addition to CARICOM and the Caribbean Ministers with responsibility for water and their senior government officials, representatives from regional and international agencies such as the United Nations Environment Programme Caribbean Environment Programme (UNEP-CEP), the Caribbean Water and Sewerage Association Inc. (CAWASA), the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA), the Pan America Health Organisation (PAHO), the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) are expected to attend. Professor John Agard who shared the Nobel Peace Prize with the United Nations’ International Panel on Climate Change, will moderate a Ministerial panel discussion at the Forum.

 Credit: WINN FM 98.9

The Green Climate Fund Accredits the 5Cs!

Credit: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Not for use without written permission.

Credit: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Not for use without written permission.

5Cs Accredited As Regional Implementing Entity by the Green Climate Fund:

Other accredited institutions include Conservation International, the World Bank and IDB

Songdo, Republic of Korea| July 09, 2015― The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre has been accredited as a regional implementing entity by the Board of the Green Climate Fund (GCF), a key multilateral financing mechanism to support climate action in developing countries. The announcement made today at the tenth meeting of the GCF Board means the CCCCC will act as a channel through which the Fund will deploy resources to the Caribbean.

This is a key achievement for the small island developing states (SIDS) of the Caribbean. Executive Director Dr. Kenrick Leslie says:

“This is the first such accreditation for the Caribbean region. It speaks to the high calibre of work being done in the region and the strength of our internal systems. We will now move forward with a set of ambitious and bankable projects that we have been developing under a directive from CARICOM Heads”.

The CCCCC is one of 13 institutions accredited by the GCF today, including Conservation International, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank and others. The GCF notes that the expansion in accreditation is demand driven.

 We are building a vibrant network of partners – which is evidence of a rising demand for an active GCF,” said Ms. Héla Cheikhrouhou, Executive Director of the Green Climate Fund. “Seven months ago we invited institutions for the first time to become partners with us. Today, close to 100 well-established institutions from around the world are working towards becoming GCF accredited entities,” she said. “We have added to this momentum by boosting our number of accredited entities to 20.

Accreditation to GCF is open to sub-national, national, regional and international, public, private and non-governmental institutions which are eligible to apply through the Fund’s Online Accreditation System (OAS). Applicants are assessed on their abilities to meet fiduciary, environmental, social, and gender requirements set out by the Fund.

 The 13 institutions accredited today are:

  1. Africa Finance Corporation (AFC), a public-private institution that provides support for sustainable development of infrastructure in Africa, based in Nigeria;
  2. Agence Française de Développement (AFD), a development finance institute, headquartered in France;
  3. Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), a public organization that coordinate’s the Caribbean’s response to climate change, headquartered in Belize;
  4. Conservation International Foundation (CI), a non-profit environmental organization based in the United States;
  5. Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF), a regional development bank, headquartered in Venezuela;
  6. Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft (Deutsche Bank AG), an international investment bank based in Germany;
  7. Environmental Investment Fund of Namibia (EIF), which supports projects that ensure sustainable use of natural resources;
  8. European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), a multilateral development bank, headquartered in the United Kingdom;
  9. Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a multilateral development bank, headquartered in the United States;
  10. International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA), together known as the World Bank, headquartered in the United States;
  11. Ministry of Natural Resources of Rwanda (MINIRENA), which focuses on environment, climate change, and natural resources management at the national and local levels;
  12. National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD), a national financial institution based in India; and the
  13. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), headquartered in Kenya.

Do you know how climate change affects the Caribbean? Peruse this video of Five Things You Should Know.

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The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change. We maintain the Caribbean’s most extensive repository of information and data on climate change specific to the region, which in part enables us to provide climate change-related policy advice and guidelines to CARICOM member states through the CARICOM Secretariat. In this role, the Centre is recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Environment Programme, and other international agencies as the focal point for climate change issues in the Caribbean. The Centre is also a United Nations Institute for Training and Research recognised Centre of Excellence, one of an elite few. Learn more about how we’re working to make the Caribbean more climate resilient by perusing The Implementation Plan.

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Caribbean and International Water and Funding Agencies Meet on a New Caribbean Climate-Proofing Water Investment Initiative

Over thirty (30) representatives from key regional and international water and finance institutions will meet in Barbados on April 9th and 10th, 2015 to help steer a new Caribbean Climate-Proofing Water Investment initiative spearheaded by the Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-C) under its Water, Climate and Development Programme (WACDEP) executed in collaboration with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC).

The two-day Consultation will provide the stakeholders with a thorough overview of the new initiative which includes the development of a Regional Caribbean Climate Resilience and Water Security Investment Plan (CReWSIP). This plan is aimed at providing a coordinated and programmatic approach to identifying, prioritising and sourcing finance for the work of regional agencies in enhancing the climate resilience of the Caribbean water sector.

The upcoming Stakeholder Consultation is a crucial step in the process to ensure that the CReWSIP responds to regional needs and will help regional institutions deliver their respective roles and mandates as they relate to water security. It provides the opportunity for regional institutions to elaborate on how the Investment Plan can support their work and to guide the process in the right direction. Additionally, it will allow development partners to define how CReWSIP could be used as a vehicle to channel resources into regional water security issues.

According to Dr. Natalie Boodram, Programme Manager of the GWP-C WACDEP, “Collaboration and coordination between regional stakeholders is essential for the Caribbean Climate Resilience and Water Security Investment Plan to deliver benefits on the ground.”

The Caribbean Climate-Proofing Water Investment Initiative is being funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) and while GWP-C and the CCCCC are coordinating the development of the CCReWSIP, the resulting programmes and projects are anticipated to be implemented through regional institutions, with the support of development partners.

Some of the organisations that will be represented at the upcoming Meeting in Barbados include: the GWP-C, the CCCCC, the CDKN, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA), the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the European Union (EU), the Department for International Development (DFID), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association (CWWA), the Caribbean Water and Sewerage Association (CAWASA), the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) and other agencies.Download media release here.

Credit: Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-C)

The CUF5 – Call for Papers

CUF-2015-Logo-Website_v1-300x298

The Saint Lucia Institute of Land Use Planners, Ministry of Physical Development, Housing and Urban Renewal, Saint Lucia, The Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), Caribbean Network for Urban and Land Management (CNULM), Caribbean Local Economic Development Project (CARILED), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UNHABITAT), and Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat will jointly host the fifth annual Caribbean Urban Forum, referred to as CUF5, from June 10th -12th, 2015, at Bay Gardens Hotel, Castries, Saint Lucia.

The Forum will bring together land managers, policy makers, academics and allied professionals interested in urban and land management issues within the Caribbean in an effort to further advance land and urban management within the region.

The main theme for the conference is “Island Systems Planning”.  Whether island or continental, the Caribbean countries share similar developmental issues and are considered Small Island Developing States (SIDS).  From previous CUFs, Island Systems Planning has been a topic that is continuously referred to.  For this reason we thought it fitting that it should be the theme for CUF5.

At this time we issue an International Call for Papers for CUF5.  The papers may focus on the following themes:

  1. Island Systems Planning
  2. Sustainable Land Management in the face of Climate Change
  3. Local Economic Development for the Caribbean
  4. Moving towards Energy Efficiency: Alternatives and Opportunities
  5. Professional Planning Practice, Education and Training in the Caribbean
  6. Habitat III Agenda – The role of Small Island States in the Habitat Agenda
  7. Housing Policy in the Caribbean: Lessons Learned and New Directions
  8. Sustainable Development in St. Lucia

Deadline for submission of Papers is March 31st 2015.  At this time we also issue a Call for Exhibitors. Please click CUF5_Call_for_Papers to download the full document.

Credit: Blue Space Caribbean

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