caribbeanclimate

Home » Posts tagged 'Green Climate Fund (GCF)'

Tag Archives: Green Climate Fund (GCF)

CCCCC’s Newsletter; Issue 1 Volume 2

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is pleased to share its Newsletter with you. You can download the issue here: Issue1 Vol2 GCF/CCCCC-1-News

If you wish to be a part of CCCCC’s mailing list for dissemination of news and updates from the CCCCC, please send your email address to pr@caribbeanclimate.bz with the subject: Subscription to CCCCC’s mailing list.

Vacancies: Country Coordinator and Technical Officer – Commonwealth of Dominica and Grenada

Background

The Green Climate Fund has recently approved the sub-regional USD $20 million climate change project: Integrated physical adaptation and community resilience through an enhanced direct access pilot in the public, private, and civil society sectors of three Eastern Caribbean small island developing states. The purpose of the Enhancing Direct Access project, or “EDA”, is to build the capacity and track record of financing structures that increase access to and direct benefits from the Green Climate Fund for households, small and medium businesses and low-income populations in Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada and Dominica. The project will provide climate change financing via grants to the public sector using the Public Sector Investment Programme (PSIP); through contractual agreement with a service provider to provide grants to the NGO sector; and; through contractual agreement with a service provider to establish and operationalize a revolving loan facilities with highly concessional small loans to homes and small businesses. The OECS Commission will coordinate independent monitoring and evaluation of the project.

For further information on the EDA, please visit:

 

Objective of the Positions

The CC and TO will be responsible for the management of the all four outputs of the GCF EDA project ensuring cohesiveness and coordination with government, civil society organization and the private sector. The objective of this consultancy is to ensure that the required outputs are accomplished in an efficient and timely manner.

 Jobs Summary

The Ministry of Finance, Planning, Economic Development & Physical Development is seeking to recruit the services of two (2) hardworking and committed individuals for the EDA project for the Period October 1st 2019 to September 30th 2020 in the first instance. The CC and TO are full-time, EDA funded staff members, and shall be responsible for the overall coordination of all aspects of the GCF EDA Project in Grenada.

For further information on key and specific deliverables for both positions, please follow this  link or request full TORs by emailing DOE@ab.gov.ag or locate the ToRs on Department of Environment, Antigua and Barbuda website: https://environment.gov.ag/procurement-opportunities#procurements/opportunities

Deadline for applications: Sunday September 22nd, 2019.

Project Preparation Partnership Launched to Support Latin America and Caribbean National Institutions Improve Capacity for Developing Climate Resilient Water Projects for the Green Climate Fund

PRESS RELEASE

Panama City, Panama, September 5th, 2019:

A Technical Workshop on Project Preparation for Transformational Climate Resilient Water Project Concepts in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) for the Green Climate Fund (GCF), was held with 95 participants  – comprised of GCF National Designated Authorities (NDAs), GCF Direct Access Entities (DAEs), representatives from Water Ministries and agencies, as well as academia – from 23 LAC countries.

The workshop was organised by the Global Water Partnership (GWP), in collaboration with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), with technical inputs from the GCF Secretariat and the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO).

Group Photo 2

Group photo of participants 

The workshop responded to countries’ needs for support to strengthen the capacity of NDAs, DAEs, and Water Ministries and agencies to prepare climate resilient water projects that meet GCF investment criteria. Participants reviewed the GCF funding requirements and mandate, investment criteria, and its operational modalities and procedures for delivering climate finance through different windows. They also considered fit-for-purpose examples of project design and financing instruments. Countries shared their experiences and lessons in accessing GCF resources. Through interactive, hands-on exercises over three days, NDAs, DAEs, and water professionals and decision-makers, worked on 36 country-prioritised water project ideas to sharpen their climate rationale and paradigm shift potential.

The workshop is a flagship initiative that is driven by a collaboration of three GWP regions – Central America, South America and the Caribbean – in accelerating climate action via water, as per the GWP 2020-2025 Strategy. Additionally, the workshop served as a pivotal milestone to launch the Project Preparation Partnership for Climate Resilient Water Projects in LAC for the GCF, between GWP, IDB and the CCCCC. It will provide a platform for countries to continue exchanging knowledge and lessons, as their experience in preparing, financing, and implementing water projects, grows within the context of the GCF.

Co-organisers and participants of the workshop, and other relevant sector entities, are invited to join the Partnership and benefit from it. The Partnership provides a structured resource for LAC countries to continue accessing strategic and technical support to prioritise and prepare climate resilient water projects via a facilitated, flexible mechanism that enables demand-driven technical assistance for NDAs, DAEs, and national water agencies.

According to a 2016 UNFCCC survey of country climate action priorities, water is the most-cited pathway through which countries experience climate impacts and also the most-often prioritised sector through which countries seek to build resilience in their economies, their inhabitants’ livelihoods, and their natural ecosystems.

But when it comes to preparing and implementing adaptation projects, few of these water actions shift from priority lists to action on the ground. Barriers cited by countries include capacity limitations within countries, and weak coordination among in-country entities including Ministries of Water, Ministries of Planning, and Ministries of Finance.

The Partnership is committed to continue the momentum generated from this workshop, with NDAs, DAEs, and ministries supporting one another to overcome barriers, drawing on the increasing expertise across the continent. Furthermore, recognising aspects of water projects that deliver development benefits that do not directly address climate impacts, require co-financing from other sources such as governments or the private sector. The Partnership will work with active and relevant financing partners for project preparation to appropriately structure financing for climate resilient GCF water projects in Latin America and the Caribbean.

 About the IDB

We work to improve lives in Latin America and the Caribbean. Through financial and technical support for countries working to reduce poverty and inequality, we help improve health and education, and advance infrastructure. Our aim is to achieve development in a sustainable, climate-friendly way. With a history dating back to 1959, today we are the leading source of development financing for Latin America and the Caribbean. We provide loans, grants, and technical assistance; and we conduct extensive research. We maintain a strong commitment to achieving measurable results and the highest standards of integrity, transparency, and accountability.

About CCCCC

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the Caribbean region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and on the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change in the Caribbean.

 About GWP

The Global Water Partnership (GWP) is a global action network with over 3,000 Partner organisations in 183 countries. GWP’s vision is a water secure world. Our mission is to advance governance and management of water resources for sustainable and equitable development.

Vacancy – Stakeholder And Gender Specialist (SGS)

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is seeking a Stakeholder and Gender Specialist to strengthen the Programme Development and Management Unit (PDMU) through the preparation of project/programme proposals for Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States and the Caribbean Region in general. The PDMU aims at ensuring improved proposals crafting for innovative, impactful and transformative projects that can qualify for bilateral or multilateral climate and/or developmental financing, inclusive of funding from the Green Climate Fund (GCF). In order to integrate gender into these project/programme proposals, the Stakeholder and Gender Specialist will develop a gender assessment and social inclusion action plan.

Peruse the following official document: Terms of Reference – Stakeholder and Gender Specialist (SGS)

Applications should be clearly identified as – “Recruitment of Consultant – Stakeholder and Gender Specialist (SGS)- Building Capacity for the Regional Approach to Climate Action in the Caribbean: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC)” and be submitted as one PDF file (in the order listed above) via email to:

Ms. Ethlyn Valladares
Human Resource Administrator
Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC)
Lawrence Nicholas Building, Ring Road
Belmopan City, Belize, C.A.
Phone: + (501) 822-1094 or 1104
hr@caribbeanclimate.bz

The deadline for the submission of applications is on or before 2:00pm (-6 GMT), Friday 13th September 2019.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Project Ideas for Private Sector to Support Low-Carbon and Climate Resilient Development in Jamaica and Other CARICOM States

The Climate Change Division of the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation (CCD-MEGJC), Jamaica invites Caribbean private sector entities with a strong business case for climate investment (existing and proposed) to submit their ‘project ideas’ to CCD-MEGJC which will be developed to access Green Climate Fund resources, specifically the GCF Private Sector Facility. These ‘project ideas’ must support their respective country’s climate change priorities and strategic development plans and align with the GCF’s investment criteria and the GCF Private Sector Facility (PSF) requirements.

Through this CPI, CCD-MEGJC will select at least ten (10) project ideas using the established Eligibility Criteria. The selected private sector entities will then be invited to participate in a training workshop to be held in Jamaica, aided by a project development consultant to transform these project ideas into concept notes that can be considered by the GCF for financial assistance. These Concept Notes will be submitted in partnership with an Accredited Entity, National Designated Authority (NDA) or focal point to the GCF.

Deadline for submission has been extended to: July 6, 2019

Request for Expressions of Interest – Project Development Specialist (PDS), Resource Mobility Officer (RMO), and Protocol Declaration Liaison Officer (PDLO) – Grenada

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received financing from Green Climate Fund (GCF), toward the cost of the project titled “Strengthening Institutional and Implementation Capacity for Delivery of Climate Change Investment Projects: Grenada” and intends to apply part of the proceeds towards the contracting of:

  • One (1) Project Development Specialist (PDS); 
  • One (1) Resource Mobility Officer (RMO);
  • One (1) ProtocolDeclaration Liaison Officer (PDLO

All suitably qualified persons are invited to submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) covering the points outlined in the TOR and accompanied by the following application documents:

  1. Letter of motivation outlining motivation and how your experience, skills, qualifications and professional networks fit with the required job description.
  2. Curriculum vitae or Résumé with full details of experience, achievements, qualifications and names
  3. Must be a national of one of the CARICOM Member States 
  4. Contact details of three (3) references 

Submissions are to be sent via email as PDF files to procurement@caribbeanclimate.bz

The deadline for the submission of EOI’s is on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6),  Friday, 28 June 2019

Peruse the required documents below:

GWP-C and CCCCC Partner with Caribbean Water Sector Stakeholders to Develop Green Climate Fund Projects

May 27th – 29th, 2019 | St. George’s, Grenada. The Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-C) in partnership with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), is convening a regional project development workshop at St. George’s University in Grenada from May 27th – 29th, 2019. The workshop is titled “An Approach to Develop a Regional Water Sector Programme for Building Resilience to Climate Change.”

The focus of the 3-day workshop, is to strengthen the capacity of Caribbean Water Utilities and Government Ministries with responsibility for Water Resources Management, in developing climate resilient water proposals, with the objective of preparing a Regional Water Sector Programme for the submission to the Green Climate Fund (GCF). More than twenty (20) representatives from ten (10) Caribbean countries will participate in the regional workshop. These countries include: Antigua and Barbuda, The Commonewealth of Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and The Bahamas.

The workshop will provide participants with knowledge on the GCF and funding opportunities, as well as introduce them to the GCF concept note and funding proposal template. Additionally, stakeholders will be able to identify priority activities and actions for the water sector and utilities in the Caribbean. This would feed into identifying next steps to further develop the Regional Programme for approval by the GCF.

The importance of the workshop cannot be overstated, as Caribbean Small Island Developing States are some of the most vulnerable islands to the impacts of Climate Change in the world, with water scarcity ranking as the most critical resource under threat. Addressing this existential threat, requires urgent action to mitigate its long-term impacts and accessing funding to do so is urgently needed.

GWP-C’s mission is to support Caribbean countries in the sustainable management of their water resources. While the CCCCC, as a regional entity accredited by the GCF, has the mandate to coordinate the Caribbean’s response to climate change. This collaboration between GWP-C and CCCCC, therefore presents a combination of knowledge and experience to foster building climate resilience in the Caribbean water sector. The ultimate objective being to make the Caribbean Water Secure.

For more information on the Regional Workshop please contact:
Gabrielle Lee Look
Communications Officer
Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-C)
E-mail: gleelook@gwp-caribbean.org
Website: http://www.gwp-caribbean.org

CCCCC To Launch US$45-M Water Improvement Project In Barbados

banner
The project is made possible through the support of the Centre’s many partners and with funding from the GCF and the GoB

BELMOPAN: May 8, 2019: A five-year multi-million dollar water improvement project that is expected to ease the chronic water woes of more than 190,000 Barbadians will be launched on Friday, May 10, 2019, at the Bowmanston Pumping Station, in St. John, Barbados. 

The Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados (WSRN S-Barbados) is a $45.2-million investment project that is being implemented by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) in collaboration with the Green Climate Fund (GCF), the Government of Barbados and the Barbados Water Authority (BWA). Funding includes US$27.6 million in grants from the GCF and counterpart funding of US$17.6 from the Barbadian government.

The WSRN S-Barbados project is the GCF’s first single-country investment in the Caribbean. When complete, it should improve access to potable water, increase the Barbados water sector’s resilience to extreme climatic events; reduce water disruptions, introduce adaptation and mitigation initiatives through a revolving fund; improve resilience to climate change while building capacity and increasing public-private-partnerships and innovation for climate resilience in the sector. 

“The Centre is proud to be working with the government and people of Barbados on such an important project,” Dr Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director of the CCCCC said, noting:

“The measures to be undertaken under this project is expected to increase adaptation and mitigation measures in households and communities; improve the country’s food security by increasing the farmers’ access to water; reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve the awareness of ordinary Barbadians to the effects of climate variability affecting the country and the wider Caribbean.”

Under the project, photovoltaic (PV) power generation systems are to be installed at the Belle, the Bowmanston and Hampton Pumping Stations to reduce the dependency of the facilities on diesel-generated electricity. Leaks are to be minimised through mains replacement and real-time monitoring. To ensure that any disruptions in the water supply would not immediately result in the loss of potable water to vulnerable sections of the population, water storage tanks and rainwater harvesting systems are to be set up in strategic locations across the island.

Mains replacement and real-time leak monitoring

The Project also includes a Revolving Adaptation Fund Facility (RAFF) to assist households, farmers and small businesses by supporting a number of climate change adaptation and mitigation initiatives in the water sector.

The Fund aims to support the installation of water irrigation and rainwater harvesting systems as well as water saving devices in households, public buildings, hotels and in agriculture operations. The RAFF will continue to build sustainability, advance adaptation and mitigation initiatives in the island’s water sector after the project ends.

General Manager of the BWA Mr. Keithroy Halliday noted: “WSRN S-Barbados project will reduce the BWA’s carbon footprint, create a more reliable water supply and increase capacity building in the Authority. It will have a positive impact by creating resilience to severe weather events, promoting public awareness on climate change effects threatening the water supply system and highlighting ways to mitigate against it as well as improving the sustainability of the water supply system.  These initiatives collectively, are expected to assist the Government of Barbados in meeting its target of carbon neutrality by 2030.”

Project partners include the United States Agency for International Development Climate Change Adaptation Project (USAID-CCAP), the University of the West Indies (UWI), University of South Florida (USF), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the European Investment Bank (EIB).  

The CCCCC has received more than US$38.54 million in GCF grants for the implementation of Climate Change and readiness projects in several countries. These include the implementation of the WSRN S-Barbados Project, a project preparation grant for the Arundo donax Renewable Energy Project in Belize, and Country Readiness grants for Belize, Bahamas, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines.
 
The CCCCC is a GCF direct-access Accredited Entity based in Belize and is the arm of CARICOM (Caribbean Community) that has responsibility for leading climate change actions in the Caribbean. As an Accredited Entity (AE), the CCCCC is positioned to assist government departments and agencies as well as private sector agencies in the Caribbean to access GCF funding for climate adaptation and mitigation project grants of up to US$50 Million per project. The Centre is also prepared to partner with other regional institutions to increase the region’s access to GCF and other donor funding.

The GCF is a global fund created to support the efforts of developing countries to respond to the challenges of climate change through a network of National Designated Authorities (NDAs) and Accredited Entities.

CCCCC participates in the GCF Structured Dialogue with the Caribbean

Members of Staff  of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre are currently participating in the The Green Climate Fund’s Structured Dialogue with the Caribbean held in Placencia, Belize, from June 19-22, 2017.  The Structured Dialogue is organized in collaboration with the Government of Belize and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre with the intention to bring together key stakeholders to increase the involvement of Caribbean countries with the GCF.

Participation of countries in the Caribbean region includes Ministers, senior government officials, including representatives of the GCF National Designated Authorities (NDAs) and Focal Points, Accredited Entities, Readiness delivery partners, civil society organizations, private sector representatives, GCF Board Members and Secretariat staff among others.

 

Group Photo of Participants at the GCF Structured Dialogue with the Caribbean

The four-day gathering provides an opportunity for countries and Accredited Entities to share their experiences in engaging with the Fund across key areas. It is also aimed at developing a roadmap for countries in the region through identification of  project opportunities in partnership with Accredited Entities, as well as mapping readiness and project preparation support needs that the GCF can provide. The CCCCC welcome this opportunity to engage with the countries and entities present at the meeting and look forward to collaborating on project preparation and implementation.

Dr. Donneil Cain, Project Development Specialist, CCCCC

Dr. Donneil Cain, Project Development Specialist at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre gave a brief overview of the CCCCC entity work programme development, which highlighted how the CCCCC develops their  work programme; the process of the development of inputs into  the work programme; addressing the challenges in developing the work programme; as well as identified ways in which the GCF could help support this process.

He highlighted that the Centre’s work programme is guided by the priority of CARICOM countries as well as the Regional Framework and Implementation Plan, which outlines the strategic direction for the region’s response to climate change risks. Projects are aligned with both national and regional strategies and plans. Climate modeling and information are also critical inputs into developing projects for our work programme. This important for building the climate change case.

Dr. Cain also identified that there are capacity constraints within the CCCCC but through coordination and collaboration, CCCCC is helping countries develop GCF ready programmes and projects. CCCCC acts as a conduit in the dissemination of relevant information to help this process and is committed to helping countries development priority programmes and projects.

The CCCCC is accredited for programmes/project value at between US$10 million and US$50 million; however, even when scaled, some of our adaptation projects would not fall within the range identified. Against this background, Dr. Cain suggested that Enhance Direct Access (EDA) facility, which is an on-granting facility, is important to delivering some adaptation initiatives in the region given their scope and scale.

On Wednesday, Dr. Mark Bynoe will expand to give details about CCCCC pipeline projects as well as identify project opportunities for the region.

The CCCCC expectations for the Structured Dialogue are:

  1. Government and NDA will have a better understanding of the GCF processes and requirements for accessing funding from the GCF; and,
  2. enhanced collaboration between entities and countries to advance adaptation and mitigation projects in the region.

A Challenge for the Caribbean: Nature and Tourism

Excerpt taken from the Inter-American Development Bank’s publication:

Integration & Trade Journal: Volume 21: No. 41: March, 2017

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, (CCCCC)

One of the greatest injustices of pollution is that its consequences are not limited to those who produce it. The Caribbean is one of the least polluting regions in the world but it is also one of the most exposed to global warming due to the importance of the tourism sector within its economy.

Carlos Fuller, an expert from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, explains the consequences of the region’s dependence on petroleum and analyzes the potential of public policy for supporting renewable energy.

How is climate change impacting the Caribbean?

The Caribbean’s greenhouse gas emissions are very small because we have a small population, we are not very industrialized, and we don’t do a lot of agriculture, so we don’t emit a lot. However, mitigation is important for us because of the high cost of fuel and energy. Most of our islands depend on petroleum as a source of energy, and when oil prices were above US$100 per barrel, we were spending more than 60% of our foreign exchange on importing petroleum products into the Caribbean. In that respect, we really want to transition to renewable energy sources as we have considerable amounts of solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass energy potential.

Has climate change started to affect tourism?

It has. Climate change is severely impacting our natural attractions, our tourist attractions. For example, we have a significant amount of erosion because of sea level rise, wave action, and storm surges, which is causing tremendous erosion and affecting our beaches. Our coral reefs, which are a big attraction, are also suffering a lot of bleaching which is impacting our fish stock. Those resources are being affected significantly. We do have significant protected areas; however, we need more resources to enforce the protection of these.

What role do public policies play in developing renewable energy?

In some countries, [we’re] doing reasonably well on this front. In Belize, for example, we now have independent coal producers and we have transitioned to an increased use of hydro, solar, and biomass, so more than 50% of our domestic electricity supply is from renewable energy sources. However, on many of the islands, we need to create an enabling environment to allow renewable energy to penetrate the market. We are going to need a lot of assistance from the international community to put in the regulatory framework that will allow us to develop renewable energy in these places. We then need to attract potential investors to provide sources of renewable energy in the region. Of course, the Caribbean’s tourism is an important sector of the economy, which is one of the reasons we need to protect our reserves and natural parks. We are also trying to make our buildings more resilient to the effects of extreme weather. That is the focus of our work.

How does the Green Climate Fund work? 

The Green Climate Fund is headquartered in South Korea and it has an independent board of management. However, various agencies can be accredited to access the fund directly. We have already applied for a project to preserve the barrier reef and another to promote biomass use in the Caribbean. So, we have two projects in the pipeline through the Green Climate Fund which are valued at around US$20 million.

Do you think that the Paris and Marrakesh summits brought concrete results for the region?

We were very pleased with the outcome in Paris. The objectives that the Caribbean Community wanted were achieved: the limit for warming was set at 2°C; adaptation was considered along with mitigation; finance, technology transfer, and capacity building were included; and a compliance system was put in place. All the things that we wanted out of Paris, we achieved, and so we are very happy with that.

Peruse the complete Integration & Trade Journal: Volume 21

%d bloggers like this: