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CCIC Extends Application Period for Proof of Concept Grant Scheme to April 20, 2014

Credit: Caribbean360.com

Credit: Caribbean360.com

The Chief Executive Officer of the Caribbean Climate Innovation Center (CCIC), Mr Everton Hanson, says the application deadline for the Proof of Concept (POC) Grant Funding Scheme has been extended to April 20, 2014.

Grant funding of up to US$50,000 is currently being provided to entrepreneurs within the Caribbean region under our POC Grant Funding Scheme.The scheme seeks to support projects or prototypes in five (5) thematic areas, namely:

(a) Resource Use Efficiency/Recycling 
(b) Water Management 
(c) Sustainable Agribusiness 
(d) Solar Energy 
(e) Energy Efficiency

The CCIC was officially launched on January 27, 2014. The Center is a World Bank financed Caribbean initiative being executed by a consortium comprising the Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI) of Trinidad and Tobago and the Scientific Research Council (SRC) in Jamaica.

The CCIC is headquartered in Jamaica and delivers its services in 14 CARICOM countries. These are Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Bahamas, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St.Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago.

The main objective of the CCIC is to support Caribbean entrepreneurs in developing appropriate technologies suitable for the mitigation or adaptation to climate change. This is expected to be achieved through the offering of services such as, among other things, technology commercialization, market development, and access to financing, mentoring and training, incubation and CAD Lab services to such entrepreneurs.

Learn more about the POC Grant Funding Scheme http://gallery.mailchimp.com/1d8dc7083e/files/POC_Flyer_March_17.pdf

The SIDS-DOCK Digest

SIDS DOCK

About the SIDS Sustainable Energy and Climate Resilient Initiative – SIDS DOCK

SIDS DOCK Institutional Mechanism
  • SIDS DOCK is a SIDS–SIDS institutional mechanism established in 2009 to facilitate the development of a sustainable energy economy within the small island developing states. SIDS DOCK serves as a “docking station” to increase SIDS access to international financing, technical expertise and technology, as well as a link to the multi-billion dollar European and US carbon markets.
SIDS DOCK Goals
  • The goals of SIDS DOCK are to mobilize in excess of USD 10-20 Billion, by 2033, to help finance the transformation of the SIDS Energy Sector to achieve a 25 percent (2005 baseline) increase in energy efficiency, generation of a minimum of 50 percent of electric power from renewable sources, and a 25 percent decrease in conventional transportation fuel use, in order to enable climate change adaptation in SIDS.
SIDS DOCK Mission
  • SIDS DOCK Mission is to catalyze the transformation of the energy sector of SIDS to increase energy security, reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), and generate resources for investment in adaptation to climate. Some SIDS governments have announced more ambitious goals for the reduction of fossil fuel use in order to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. By providing SIDS with a dedicated and flexible mechanism to pursue sustainable energy, SIDS DOCK will make it easier for SIDS Development Partners to invest across multiple island States, and to more frequently reach investment scale that can be of interest to commercial global financing.
SIDS DOCK Functions
  • SIDS DOCK has four principal functions:
  1. A mechanism to help SIDS develop low carbon economies that generate the financial resources to invest in climate change adaptation
  2. Assist SIDS transition to a sustainable energy sector, by increasing energy efficiency and conservation, and development of renewable energy;
  3. Providing a vehicle for mobilizing financial and technical resources to catalyse clean economic growth;
  4. Provide SIDS with a mechanism for connecting with the global carbon market (“DOCKing”) and taking advantage of the resource transfer possibilities that will be afforded.
SIDS DOCK Funding
  • In December 2010, in Cancun, Mexico, SIDS DOCK received a one-year grant of USD14.5 million in start-up contributions from the Government of Denmark, followed a grant of USD 15 million over two years (2012-2014) from the Government of Japan in December 2011, in Durban, South Africa.

Indoor Mini-Farms to Beat Climate Change

Industrial engineer Ancel Bhagwandeen says growing your food indoor is a great way to protect crops from the stresses of climate change. So he developed a hydroponic system that “leverages the nanoclimates in houses so that the house effectively protects the produce the same way it protects us,” he says.

Bhagwandeen told IPS that his hydroponic project was also developed “to leverage the growth of the urban landscape and high-density housing, so that by growing your own food at home, you mitigate the cost of food prices.”

The hydroponic unit can also run on solar energy. Credit: Jewel Fraser/IPS

The hydroponic unit can also run on solar energy. Credit: Jewel Fraser/IPS

Hydroponics, a method of growing plants without soil using mineral nutrients in water, is increasingly considered a viable means to ensure food security in light of climate change.

His project is one of several being considered for further development by the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC), headquartered in Jamaica.

The newly launched CCIC, which is funded mainly by the World Bank and the government of Canada, seeks to  fund innovative projects that will “change the way we live, work and build to suit a changing climate,” said Everton Hanson, the CCIC’s CEO.

Dr. Ulric Trotz, Deputy Director and Science Advisor at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, 
chairs the CCIC's Management Committee.

A first step to developing such projects is through Proof of Concept (POC) funding, which makes available grants from 25,000 to 50,000 dollars to successful applicants to “help the entrepreneur to finance those costs that are related to proving that the idea can work,” said Hanson.

Among the items that POC funding will cover are prototype development such as design, testing, and field trials; market testing; raw materials and consumables necessary to achieve proof of concept; and costs related to applications for intellectual property rights in the Caribbean.

A POC competition is now open that will run until the end of March. “After that date the applications will be evaluated. We are looking for ideas that can be commercialised and the plan is to select the best ideas,” Hanson said.

The CCIC, which is jointly managed by the Scientific Research Council in Jamaica and the Caribbean Industrial Research Institute in Trinidad and Tobago, is seeking projects that focus on water management, resource use efficiency, energy efficiency, solar energy, and sustainable agribusiness.

Bhagwandeen entered the POC competition in hopes of securing a grant, because “this POC funding would help in terms of market testing,” he explained.

The 48-year-old engineer says he wishes to build dozens of model units and “distribute them in various areas, then monitor the operations and take feedback from users.” He said he would be testing for usability and reliability, as well as looking for feedback on just how much light is needed and the best locations in a house or building for situating his model.

“I would then take the feedback, and any issues that come up I can refine before going into mass marketing,” he said.

Bhagwandeen’s model would enable homeowners to grow leafy vegetables, including herbs, lettuce and tomatoes, inside their home or apartment, with minimal expense and time.

The model uses smart electronics, meaning that 100 units can run on the same energy as a 60-watt light bulb, he said. So it differs from typical hydroponics systems that consume a great deal of energy, he added. His model can also run on the energy provided by its own small solar panel and can work both indoors and outdoors.

Bhagawandeen said his model’s design is premised on the fact that “our future as a people is based more and more on city living and in order for that to be sustainable, we need to have city farming at a family level.”

U.N. report says that “the population living in urban areas is projected to gain 2.6 billion, passing from 3.6 billion in 2011 to 6.3 billion in 2050.” Most of that urban growth will be concentrated in the cities and towns of the world’s less developed regions.

To meet the challenges of climate change adaptation, the CCIC “will support Caribbean entrepreneurs involved in developing locally appropriate solutions to climate change.”

Bhagwandeen said that support from organisations like the CCIC is critical for climate change entrepreneurs. “From the Caribbean perspective, especially Trinidad and Tobago, we are a heavily consumer-focused society. One of the negatives of Trinidad’s oil wealth is that we are not accustomed to developing technology for ourselves. We buy it.”

“We are a society of traders and distributors and there is very little support for innovators and entrepreneurs.”

He said access to markets and investors poses a serious challenge for regional innovators like himself, who typically have to rely on bootstrapping to get their business off the ground.

Typically, he said, regional innovators have to make small quantities of an item, sell those items, and then use the funds to make incrementally larger quantities. “So that if you get an order for 500 units, you cannot fulfill that order,” he said.

Fourteen Caribbean states are involved in CCIC: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago.

The Caribbean CCIC is one of eight being developed across the world.

Credit: Inter Press Services News Agency

Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre Seeks Two Climate Leaders…

CCIC

Credit: The Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC)

The recently launched Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC) is recruiting two Climate Innovation Leaders. Peruse the flyer for details. The posts will be based in Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago with travel to other territories in the Caribbean.  The CCIC is a regional World Bank/infoDev project being managed jointly by the Caribbean Industrial Research Centre (CARIRI) of Trinidad and Tobago and the Scientific Research Council (SRC) of Jamaica. The Centre,  among  other  things,  seeks  to  accelerate  the  development  and  deployment  of  relevant  and  appropriate  climate technologies in Caribbean countries.

The  CCIC  provides  services  and  financing  to  enable  local  small  and  medium  enterprises  implement  innovative  climate change  mitigation  and  adaptation  solutions  that  meet  local  needs  profitably.  Solutions  will  be  in  the  areas  of  water management,  resource  use  efficiency,  energy  efficiency,  solar  energy  and  sustainable  agriculture.  The  services  offered include  advisory  and  mentoring,  proof  of  concept,  financing,  creating  a  conducive  policy  environment  for  mitigation  and adaptation  technology  adoption,  access  to  appropriate  facilities  for  business  incubation  and  access  to  relevant  technical, market and financial information.

Also read: Caribbean Green Tech Incubator Launched

Caribbean Green Tech Incubator Launched

CCIC Image

Credit: World Bank/infoDev

The Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC) was launched today (Monday, January 27, 2014) at the Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI) in Trinidad and Tobago. The World Bank/infoDev initiative, which is being administered by the Jamaica-based Scientific Research Council and Trinidad and Tobago-based Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI), will function as an incubator for businesses solving climate change problems and promote investment in green technology in the region. The Centre is one of eight globally, as others are located in Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Kenya, Morocco, South Africa and Vietnam.

The Centre will provide grant funding of up to US$50,000.00 to MSMEs/ entities to assist them in developing prototypes for commercialization.

The Centre’s five focus areas are:
  • Solar Energy – e.g. Residential and commercial self generation, residential and commercial water heating, solar powered air conditioning
  • Resource Use Efficiency – e.g. waste-to energy, materials recovery, reuse and recycling
  • Sustainable Agribusiness – e.g. water/ energy efficient irrigation systems; waste management; high value agribusiness; sustainable land use practices; waste to energy; wind and solar energy for farms
  • Energy Efficiency – e.g. Lighting, household appliances, air conditioning, commercial cooling and ventilation systems, consumer behavior, building and energy management systems, building design and materials
  • Water Management – e.g. Potable water, rain water harvesting, efficient irrigation, wastewater treatment and recycling, water use efficiency, desalination
CCIC Image 2

Credit: World Bank/infoDev/Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre

Dr Ulric Trotz, Chairperson of the CCIC, and Deputy Director of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, says the CCIC  comes to fruition at a point when unsustainable and inefficient energy consumption exacerbates the enormous socio-economic constraints faced by Member States of the Caribbean Community.

The region, which is among the most vulnerable places to climate change and climate variability, imports in excess of 170 million barrels of petroleum products annually, with 30 million barrels used in the electric sector alone, at a cost of up to 40% of  already scarce foreign exchange earnings.  This dependence on ever more expensive imported fossil fuels increases our economic vulnerability and reduces our ability to invest in climate compatible development. Therefore, it’s crucial that we support initiatives that can make the region’s energy sector more efficient through increased use of renewable energy, which will in turn reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

This comes at a time when economies around the world are re-orientating towards low-carbon, green growth pathways, which have the potential to make some of our established industries, including tourism, more attractive to discerning travellers who are willing to spend more for environmentally sensitive travel packages.

The Centre offers this region a unique opportunity to leverage technological innovation in its bid to adapt and mitigate challenges brought forth by climate change, with particular focus on energy efficiency, resource use, agriculture and water management, as the regional technology space is rapidly evolving and seems poised to take-off with the advent of events and groups like DigiJam 3.0, Caribbean Startup Week, Slashroots, among others. This is encouraging as the development, deployment and diffusion of technology are key factors in any effort to mitigate and adapt to the current and future impacts of climate change.  So the Centre is uniquely positioned to capitalize on these developments and focus them to achieve essential technological advancement.

~Dr Ulric Trotz, Chairperson of the CCIC, and Deputy Director of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre

Please view the CCIC website at www.caribbeancic.org for further information.

5Cs launches first CARICOM-wide energy efficiency project

eNERGY EFFICIENCY

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre launched a four year (2013- 2017) multi-million dollar regional energy efficiency project on August 13, 2013. The US$12,484,500 Energy for Sustainable Development (ESD) in Caribbean Buildings Project, which is jointly funded by a grant (US$4,859,000) from the Global Environment Facility (GEF), and co-financing in the sum of US$7,625,500 from the Centre and five Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries, seeks to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 20% in the near-term and make the region’s energy sectors more efficient through increased use of renewable energy.

Approximately 30 key stakeholders involved in the project, including representatives from the five participating countries (Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Saint Lucia and the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago) were in attendance for the launch event in Belize City, Belize.

Dr. Al Binger, Energy Science Advisor at the Centre and Technical Coordinator for the ESD Project, says Belize will be the first CARICOM country to begin implementation.

The project is the first regional project of its kind in CARICOM.

  The project is expected to:
  1. Increase the number of successful commercial applications of energy efficiency and conservation in buildings
  2. Expand the market for renewable energy technology applications for power generation and productive uses
  3. Enhance institutional capacity to design, implement and monitor energy projects for sustainable development
  4. Provide access and availability of financing energy efficiency and conservation and renewable energy projects Increase awareness and knowledge about sustainable energy among key stakeholders.

Dr. Binger says the project is particularly important as the region imports in excess of 170 million barrels of petroleum products, annually, with 30 million barrels used in the electric sector, much of which is consumed by buildings across the region. Therefore, improving the efficiency of energy use in the building sector is a project priority.

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is the GEF implementing agency, and the Centre as the executing agency. The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) will provide technical support.

Also read: Brian Bernal Tackles Climate Change Resilience and Building Codes in the Caribbean

Clean Development Mechanism Opportunity in Belize

Cave KarstThe Government of Belize, through the Ministry of Forestry, Fisheries and Sustainable Development, is accepting Project Idea Notes (PINs) focused on energy efficiency and conservation, solid and liquid bio-fuels and biogas, wind and solar energy and the transport sector until 4pm on Friday, August 23, 2013.

The PINs  are a requirement for Belize’s participation in the Clean Development Mechanism capacity building programme,  and will be submitted as part of the project approval process as set out in the fourth and fifth schedule of the Environmental Protection (Clean Development Mechanism) Regulations, 2011.

The CDM programme is being implemented in collaboration with the European Commission and United Nations Environment Programme, through the UNEP RISO Centre—a leading international research and advisory institution on energy, climate and sustainable development.

The request for expressions of interest is aimed at national and/or regional project developers and consultants with technical and other capacities in the identification, design and implementation of projects—preferably in the environmental field.

The project seeks to strengthen the technical capacity of national consultants in the design of Project Idea Notes (PIN).

Read the Ministry’s ad here and peruse the official Request For Proposal here.

COTED Energy Meeting Next Month

The Forty-First Special Meeting of the Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) on Energy will be held in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago from 27 February to 1 March 2013. The Ministerial Session will be held on 1 March following the Preparatory Meeting of Officials on 27 February 2013.

Two key items on the Agenda are the finalization of the Regional Energy Policy and Agreement by Member States on Targets and Strategies for Renewable Energy (RE) and Energy efficiency (EE) under the first phase of the Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy (C-SERMS). Learn more about this and other Energy matters in the Caribbean via CC Energy – Issue 13_Oct – Dec 2012.

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