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5Cs Wins Energy Globe Award for Renewable Energy and Potable Water Project in Bequia, St Vincent and the Grenadines

St.Vincent_and_theGrenadines_banner2015

SVG Certificate

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) received the 2015 Energy Globe Award for its renewable energy and potable water work in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Energy Globe, an internationally recognized trademark for sustainability, is one of the most important environmental prizes today with 177 participating countries. The award, which is made from a cross-section of over 1, 500 entries annually, is given in recognition of outstanding performance in terms of energy efficiency, renewable energy and resource conservation.

The CCCCC won the 2015 Energy Globe National Award for the project “Special Programme for Adaptation to Climate Change”. The project was executed on the island of Bequia in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and focuses on the production and provision of clean drinking water for more than 1,000 people. This is being done through the acquisition and installation of a reverse osmosis desalination plant. The project is deemed highly sustainable as the water input is inexhaustible sea water and the energy used is solar, a renewable, carbon-free source.

 Learn more about the project!

The landmark project was also presented by Energy Globe as part of a global online campaign (www.energyglobe.info) on World Environment Day. The campaign ran under the patronage of UNESCO and in cooperation with UNEP and received significant recognition.

“To be honoured with this award is a great recognition of our work for a better environment and motivates us to continue our endeavours in the future,” – Henrik Personn, Renewable Energy Expert, CCCCC

Since completing this key project, we have applied the lessons learned in Belize and on the Grenadian islands of Petite Martinique and Carriacou. Review the poster below to learn more about the progress we are making in Grenada:

Credit: CCCCC

Do you have an excellent project? Submit it for the Energy Globe Award 2016. Review the details on www.energyglobe.info.

The Green Climate Fund Accredits the 5Cs!

Credit: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Not for use without written permission.

Credit: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Not for use without written permission.

5Cs Accredited As Regional Implementing Entity by the Green Climate Fund:

Other accredited institutions include Conservation International, the World Bank and IDB

Songdo, Republic of Korea| July 09, 2015― The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre has been accredited as a regional implementing entity by the Board of the Green Climate Fund (GCF), a key multilateral financing mechanism to support climate action in developing countries. The announcement made today at the tenth meeting of the GCF Board means the CCCCC will act as a channel through which the Fund will deploy resources to the Caribbean.

This is a key achievement for the small island developing states (SIDS) of the Caribbean. Executive Director Dr. Kenrick Leslie says:

“This is the first such accreditation for the Caribbean region. It speaks to the high calibre of work being done in the region and the strength of our internal systems. We will now move forward with a set of ambitious and bankable projects that we have been developing under a directive from CARICOM Heads”.

The CCCCC is one of 13 institutions accredited by the GCF today, including Conservation International, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank and others. The GCF notes that the expansion in accreditation is demand driven.

 We are building a vibrant network of partners – which is evidence of a rising demand for an active GCF,” said Ms. Héla Cheikhrouhou, Executive Director of the Green Climate Fund. “Seven months ago we invited institutions for the first time to become partners with us. Today, close to 100 well-established institutions from around the world are working towards becoming GCF accredited entities,” she said. “We have added to this momentum by boosting our number of accredited entities to 20.

Accreditation to GCF is open to sub-national, national, regional and international, public, private and non-governmental institutions which are eligible to apply through the Fund’s Online Accreditation System (OAS). Applicants are assessed on their abilities to meet fiduciary, environmental, social, and gender requirements set out by the Fund.

 The 13 institutions accredited today are:

  1. Africa Finance Corporation (AFC), a public-private institution that provides support for sustainable development of infrastructure in Africa, based in Nigeria;
  2. Agence Française de Développement (AFD), a development finance institute, headquartered in France;
  3. Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), a public organization that coordinate’s the Caribbean’s response to climate change, headquartered in Belize;
  4. Conservation International Foundation (CI), a non-profit environmental organization based in the United States;
  5. Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF), a regional development bank, headquartered in Venezuela;
  6. Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft (Deutsche Bank AG), an international investment bank based in Germany;
  7. Environmental Investment Fund of Namibia (EIF), which supports projects that ensure sustainable use of natural resources;
  8. European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), a multilateral development bank, headquartered in the United Kingdom;
  9. Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), a multilateral development bank, headquartered in the United States;
  10. International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA), together known as the World Bank, headquartered in the United States;
  11. Ministry of Natural Resources of Rwanda (MINIRENA), which focuses on environment, climate change, and natural resources management at the national and local levels;
  12. National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD), a national financial institution based in India; and the
  13. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), headquartered in Kenya.

Do you know how climate change affects the Caribbean? Peruse this video of Five Things You Should Know.

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The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change. We maintain the Caribbean’s most extensive repository of information and data on climate change specific to the region, which in part enables us to provide climate change-related policy advice and guidelines to CARICOM member states through the CARICOM Secretariat. In this role, the Centre is recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Environment Programme, and other international agencies as the focal point for climate change issues in the Caribbean. The Centre is also a United Nations Institute for Training and Research recognised Centre of Excellence, one of an elite few. Learn more about how we’re working to make the Caribbean more climate resilient by perusing The Implementation Plan.

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5Cs funded climate-smart facility opened in Saint Lucia

Renovated and retrofitted Marchand Community Centre; Credit: Earl Green

Renovated and retrofitted Marchand Community Centre; Credit: Earl Green

A team from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre led by Executive Director Dr Kenrick Leslie was present yesterday for the official opening of the Marchand Community Centre, a climate-smart facility near Castries, Saint Lucia. The Marchand  Community Centre was renovated and retrofitted as a pilot adaptation project under the Special Programme on Adaptation to Climate Change ( SPACC): Implementation of Adaptation Measures in Coastal Zones Project— a multi component initiative executed by the Centre with co-financing from the Global Environment Fund (GEF) through the World Bank and the Government of Saint Lucia.

Other participating countries included Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and The Commonwealth of Dominica.
Dr Kenrick Leslie, CBE; Credit: Earl Green

Dr Kenrick Leslie, CBE; Credit: Earl Green

The community centre was renovated and retrofitted to demonstrate the design and implementation of appropriate interventions to reinforce critical infrastructure that can withstand the effects of intensified wind speeds from category three and above hurricanes. Dr Leslie told the gathering of community members, government officials and media that the US$300, 000 facility, 60% of which was financed through the Centre, incorporates new wind speed engineering design and is an energy efficiency success story. He noted that the facility features a US$36, 000 photovoltaic (PV) component funded by the 5Cs, Government of Saint Lucia and Caribbean Renewable Energy Development Programme (CREDP) that will ensure the provision of power during outages, which will prove essential in the event of a storm.

Reinforced critical infrastructure such as the Marchand Community Centre, a multipurpose facility slated to also function as a hurricane shelter, is a key part of efforts to make the Caribbean more climate resilient, especially as scientists predict an average of three to four Category 4 and 5 hurricanes per year by 2025 in the Atlantic Basin.

This successful pilot project has already yielded significant systemic changes that will benefit Saint Lucia and the wider region. These changes include:

  • Incorporation of the Marchand  Community Centre into Saint Lucia’s National Emergency Management Plan (NEMP)-Cabinet Conclusion 1159/2009 of September 24, 2009
  • Incorporation of design wind speed standards into Saint Lucia’s Development Control Authority (DCA) process for commercial and public buildings
  • Incorporation of improved engineering standards into Saint Lucia’s Building Codes 
  • Strengthening of the Caribbean Unified Building Code
  • Training, promulgation of standards
The multipurpose facility will be used for a myriad of activities, including:
  1. National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) storage facility (One section of the ground floor)
  2. Weekly Feeding Programme (One section of the ground floor)
  3. Daily Boxing Programme (Top floor)
  4. Meetings/community events (Top floor)
  5. Shelter during natural disasters, including mudslides (for example the Black Mallet community) and hurricanes (First floor)
Marchand Community Centre Before Renovation; Credit: Earl Green

Marchand Community Centre Before Renovation; Credit: Earl Green

Improvements made to the Marchand Community Centre
    • Redesign and replace of roof
    • Hurricane strapped roof structure
    • Natural ventilation via dormers
    • Impact resistant windows
    • Energy-efficient lighting and appliance
    • Generation of electricity using photovoltaic (PV) technology, including battery backup
    • Ramp
    • Strengthened stairways
    • Balcony (sustainability) facing field
    • Water storage
           - Potable water
           - Rainwater harvesting  
    • Water conservation, through the use of low-flush toilets, basins etc.

CCORAL Gets International Recognition: CIR Magazine Risk Management Awards 2013

  • Caribbean climate change tool recognised at major risk management awards
  • Developed by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and climate risk consultancy Acclimatise (www.acclimatise.uk.com)
  • CCORAL developed with funding from the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN)
  • CIR magazine Risk Management Awards 2013 recognise creative thinking and innovation to risk management.
Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation TooL (CCORAL) Infographic

Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation TooL (CCORAL) Infographic

The Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation tooL (CCORAL) has been recognised at a major international risk management awards. CCORAL, a web-based tool designed to help decision makers in the Caribbean integrate climate resilience into their decision making and planning processes, was developed by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre with technical support from climate risk consultancy Acclimatise and funding from the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN).

The seminal risk management tool helped the consulting outfit to cop the prestigious ‘Consultancy of the Year’ award at the CIR magazine Risk Management Awards 2013.

The award recognised ‘consultants that deliver real creative thinking and innovation to risk management’, and Acclimatise CEO and CO-Founder John Firth was especially pleased that the hard work that was put into CCORAL had been recognised saying “This award is really an honour that we share with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. It is fantastic that CCORAL has been recognised in this way and further underlines what a powerful tool it is for climate risk management in the Caribbean region.”

The award follows a series of successes for CCORAL, which was referred to recently in the Jamaican parliament, with the Minister for Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Robert Pickersgill, saying that the tool will be used “to assess the risk of community and national projects against specific climate change scenarios”.

The Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC), Dr Rajendra Pachauri has also praised CCORAL saying “The development of the… tool [is] an extremely important asset in assessing the risk from the impacts of climate change in the Caribbean region”.

Deputy Director and Science Advisor at the CCCCC Dr Ulric Trotz says CCORAL, which allows for the integration of climate change and a risk ethic into national development planning across sectors, comes as part of a continued effort by Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Heads of Government to strengthen climate adaptation. Last year they approved the 2011-2021 Implementation Plan to operationalise the Regional Framework for Achieving Development Resilient to Climate Change.

The Implementation Plan was also designed by the CCCCC  with technical support from Acclimatise and funding from CDKN and DFID Caribbean. One priority challenge identified in the plan was the need to develop a risk management ethic in decision making in the Caribbean, ensuring the use of risk management processes and tools, management of uncertainties and integration of climate change into national development planning and decision making. CCORAL has been developed in response to this need.

To download a copy of the CCORAL brochure, please click here. To download a copy of the CCORAL infographic please click here. To download a copy of the CCORAL factsheet please click here.

To view the Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation TooL (CCORAL) please click here.

Building Resilience in Communities & Disaster Risk Reduction (Presentation)

The Belize Red Cross (BRC) gave a wide-ranging presentation aboutBuilding Resilience in Communities and Disaster Risk Reduction with a focus on Climate Change to staff members of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre’s (CCCCC) this week (November 6, 2013).

International Federation of the Red Cross Disaster Management Officer Pria Rai introduced the new Caribbean Climate Change Adaptation (3CA) Toolkit, which includes tools designed to facilitate:

  • Implementing a Climate Change/ Disaster Risk Reduction (CC/DRR) programme 
  • Training in the 3CA methodology
  • Communicating climate change 
  • Pre-designed tools to collect data at the community level 
  • Linking secondary sources of information for validation of data/information collected from community members using other Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment (VCA) tools-analytical  tools 
  • presenting information quickly, while ensuring that relevant data is collected, and in a manner that is easily understood by community members which will reduce the time it takes to analyze data

The BRC and the Centre have long collaborated in areas such as VCAs for Belize and the wider Caribbean.

Peruse the BRC‘s presentation here.

5Cs supports the Caribbean’s first ‘National Consultation on a Framework for Climate Services’

Climate Services

Filipe Lucio (left), Head of the GFCS, WMO, and Dr Ulric Trotz (right), Deputy Director, CCCCC

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) supported the region’s first National Consultation on a Framework for Climate Services in Belize last week (October 30- November 1, 2013). The consultation, organized in association with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the National Meteorological Service of Belize, and the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), sought to advance the priorities under the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) by  focusing on:

  • Assessing climate services needs in the agriculture and food security sector based on
    generated climate information in the country;
  • Recommending effective mechanisms and practices to improve interfacing and interactionsbetween climate service providers and users;
  • Articulating the capacity building needs in terms of mandates, infrastructure and human
    resources for all the components of GFCS;
  • Recommending actions to improve productions, sustainable operations and accessibility for
    climate predictions and services to aid the flow of climate information from global and 
    regional scale to national and local scales;
  • Charting a roadmap for the effective development and application of climate services in support of agriculture and food security and other climate sensitive sectors in Belize,particularly water, which is of strategic import to the Agricultural Sector of theCaribbean Region.

The consultation brought together key decision-makers and users from the initial four priority areas under the GFCS: agriculture and food security, water, health and disaster risk reduction. It identified suitable mechanisms for improving and sustaining the flow of climate information to users with particular focus on agriculture and food security. The exercise also sought to enhance understanding of the need for climate services on sectors most impacted by climate change that can be implemented at the national level across the Caribbean.

The Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) was established in 2009 at the World Climate Conference-3, which was organized by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in collaboration with other United Nations (UN) agencies, governments and partners to steer the development of climate services worldwide.

The vision of the GFCS is to enable society to better manage the risks and opportunities arising from climate variability and change, especially for those who are most vulnerable to such risks.

The GFCS, which was launched in the Caribbean in May 2013, use five components for the production, delivery and application of climate information and services in the four priority areas outlined:

  • User Interface Platform
  • Climate Services Information System
  • Observations and Monitoring
  • Research, Modelling and Prediction
  • Capacity Development

The next National Consultation on a Framework for Climate Services will be held in Barbados.

The Australia Caribbean Coral Reef Collaboration: Managing coral reefs in a changing climate

Coral reefs in the Caribbean are amongst the most at risk globally. Having lost 80% of its corals over the last half century, mainly due to a changing and variable climate, coastal development and pollution, the region is seeking to turn the tide.

Warming seas brought forth by climate change have contributed to corals being “bleached” – a state where the tiny polyps that build the reefs die. This is particularly problematic as coral reefs are showcases of biodiversity, centrepieces of cultural identity and sources of sustainable economic opportunity. Loss of reefs is a serious economic problem in the Caribbean, where large populations depend on fishing and tourism.

These realities are the basis for the Australia Caribbean Coral Reef Collaboration: Managing coral reefs in a changing climate. The two year programme (2012-2014) seeks to bring together coral reef managers and policymakers from across the world to improve the outlook for the Caribbean’s coral reefs in the face of climate change by:

  • Developing a Regional Plan of Action for reducing coral reef vulnerability amidst a changing climate,
  • Enhancing knowledge exchange between Australia and the Caribbean region through Collaborative Projects
  • Providing a platform for engagement and capacity building across the region through a Climate Change Adaptation Resource Portal
Regional Plan of Action

The Regional Plan of Action will provide a regional vision for building resilience of coral reefs to climate change and identify key needs and opportunities for national and international initiatives. The programme will also establish a framework for mainstreaming adaptation strategies for coral reefs into Caribbean Community (CARICOM) member states’ sustainable development agenda, in a manner that advances the implementation of the landmark  Regional Framework for Achieving Development Resilient to Climate Change (2009-2015).

Resource portal

A dedicated Climate Change Adaptation Resource Portal is also being developed to provide a one-stop shop for coral reef managers and policymakers seeking the latest and best concepts, tools and resources for managing coral reefs in a changing climate.

Collaborative projects

Five collaborative projects are being implemented to enhance knowledge exchange between Australia and the Caribbean region, especially in priority areas such as biodiversity conservation, integration of social and economic considerations, strategic coastal management, stewardship and reef health assessment.

Project activities are being coordinated with existing activities and organisations within the region to ensure integration and sustainability of project benefits.

The projects include:
Marine biodiversity offsetstoward no net loss of biodiversity in a changing climate
Outlook reporting: Building climate change into integrated coastal management
Monitoring multi-tool for managersA monitoring protocol for meeting the information needs of decision-makers
Building social resilience into reef management: guidance to help managers integrate social and economic considerations into decisions
Reef stewardship: A Caribbean program for harnessing people power for reef management
Development Partners

The Australia Caribbean Coral Reef Collaboration is supported by the Australian Government through the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID). Implementation of the program is being led by Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) in partnership with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (5Cs) under the auspices of the Caribbean Community Secretariat (CARICOM).

Key project partners include:

Program activities are coordinated with other important regional programs and initiatives, including:

CCORAL training for Jamaican ministers this year

The Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation tooL or CCORAL, launched last month by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), will be used to integrate climate change considerations into decision making across the region. The tool was referred to recently in the Jamaican parliament, with the Minister for Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Robert Pickersgill, saying that the tool will be used “to assess the risk of community and national projects against specific climate change scenarios”.

Importantly, the Minister went on to state that “before the end of the year, we will be commencing with the training of all Ministers and Heads of Agencies in using [CCORAL]”. The Jamaican parliaments intention to ensure that key decision makers are trained in the use of CCORAL, is a promising signal that the tool will become an important tool in increasing the climate resilience of Jamaica and other nations in the Caribbean region.

The CCORAL tool will be an important addition to the Jamaican government’s arsenal for fighting climate change. The nation is facing some considerable challenges to adapt to climate impacts such as sea level rise which has seen some parts of the island submerged, threatening the livelihoods of coastal communities.

Speaking to IPS news recently, Conrad Douglas, a Jamaican environmental scientist said that “People speak about the likelihood of Barbuda disappearing in 40 years, but this is a reality in Jamaica at the present time”.

Douglas said that sea level rise is affecting people’s livelihoods, incomes and lifestyles, “exposing us to all sort of other problems that could threaten the security of the country and of the region”.

CCORAL is a web-based tool designed to help decision makers in the Caribbean integrate climate resilience into their decision making and planning processes.

Dr Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), said of CCORAL “The development of the… tool [is] an extremely important asset in assessing the risk from the impacts of climate change in the Caribbean region. I would like to compliment the CCCCC for having taken this initiative”.

Learn more about the CCORAL tool by clicking here.

Access the tool by clicking here.

CCORAL Is Here! Endorsed by the IPCC Chair

In keeping with its thrust to promote a culture of risk management across the region, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre launched a seminal online support tool in Saint Lucia today. The launch event, which was  attended by permanent secretaries from ministries of finance and planning, development partners, Saint Lucia’s Deputy Prime Minister Philip J. Pierre (among other St. Lucian officials), a broad cross-section of regional stakeholders and journalists, officially introduced the Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation TooL (CCORAL).

In his keynote address Dr. James Fletcher, Saint Lucia’s Minister of Public Service, Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology, urged the region to ensure broad use and adaptability of CCORAL. He added that CCORAL, which has been endorsed by Chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Dr. Rajendra Kumar Pachauri, will promote climate-smart development by helping to embed a risk management ethic in decision-making processes across the region.

“The development of the risk assessment tool [is] an extremely important asset in assessing the risk from the impacts of climate change in the Caribbean region,” according to Dr. Pachauri. The two dozen island nations of the Caribbean, and the 40 million people who live there, are in a state of increased vulnerability to climate change. Higher temperatures, sea level rise, and increased hurricane intensity threaten lives, property and livelihoods throughout the region. Against this background, CCORAL will help to boost the capacity of these countries to assess their risk amidst a variable and changing climate, while creating pathways for the identification and implementation of adaptation and mitigation options.

CCORAL is a practical approach to cost-effective climate-resilient investment projects,” says Dr. Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. “CCORAL will aid the region in defining approaches and solutions that will provide benefits now and in the future by adopting ‘no-regret’ actions and flexible measures.”

(L-R) Dr. Trotz, Deputy Director, CCCCC; Sylvester Clauzel, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology, Saint Lucia;  Keith Nichols, Project Development Specialist, CCCCC; Dr. Bynoe, Sr. Environmental  & Resource Economist, CCCCC;  Dr. Fletcher, Minister of the Public Service, Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology, Saint Lucia; and Deputy Prime Minister of Saint Lucia Philip J. Pierre

(L-R) Dr. Trotz, Deputy Director, CCCCC; Sylvester Clauzel, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology, Saint Lucia; Keith Nichols, Project Development Specialist, CCCCC; Dr. Bynoe, Sr. Environmental & Resource Economist, CCCCC; Dr. Kenrick Leslie, CBE, Executive Director, CCCCC; Dr. Fletcher, Minister of the Public Service, Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology, Saint Lucia; and Deputy Prime Minister of Saint Lucia Philip J. Pierre

It is intended to be used primarily by agencies at the regional and national level with responsibility for development, planning and finance, the private sector and non-governmental organisations. Ministries of Finance and/or Planning are central to the initial efforts to anchor this tool in climate resilience-building decisions. Notwithstanding, civil society organisations, universities, financial services and development partners, local communities can also use CCORAL to inform actions that must embed climate considerations. The tool is available to all member countries through an open source online platform at ccoral.caribbeanclimate.bz.

According to Keith Nichols, Programme Development Specialist at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, “the development of the risk assessment tool emerged after an extensive consultation process with regional stakeholders to ensure authenticity, relevance and ownership”. It is a direct response to the requirement of the Regional Framework for Achieving Development Resilient to Climate Change (the “Regional Framework”) and the landmark Implementation Plan (IP) that were endorsed by CARICOM Heads in 2009 and 2012, respectively. The IP acknowledges that a transformational change in mindset, institutional arrangements, operating systems, collaborative approaches and integrated planning mechanisms are essential to deliver the strategic elements and goals of the Regional Framework and to enable climate smart development by embedding a risk management ethic in decision-making.

The Caribbean Climate Online Risk and Adaptation Tool (CCORAL), has been developed by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) with funding from the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and the Climate Development and Knowledge Network (CDKN).

Learn more about CCORAL by viewing the CCORAL Fact Sheet and Brochure.

Updated July 12, 2013 at 12:07pm post-lauch

FAO Hosts GHG Emissions Statistics Workshop in Trinidad

Roundtable 1The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre participated in the recently concluded  (June 3-4, 2013) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) Statistics Workshop in Port of Spain. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) event was organized in collaboration with the Ministry of Planning and Sustainable Development and the Ministry of Food Production, Land and Marine Resources for Latin American countries. This was the second of a series of regional workshops being undertaken by the FAO to raise awareness of the importance of agricultural statistics for the preparation of GHG inventories and the development of national mitigation strategies to improve agricultural productivity, food security and environmental sustainability.

Representatives of the FAO delivered presentations on agriculture and climate change, emissions from the agriculture sector and the data required for estimating these emissions. They also presented the FAO project, Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG). The activities of the project include the development of an online agriculture, forestry and land use emissions database (FAOSTAT). The database contains the emissions from all FAO Members in these sectors from 1990 to 2010 using the IPCC 2006 methodology. Further developments in FAOSTAT will include emission projections to 2050.  Representatives of the IPCC Task Force on Inventories (TFI) presented on the use of the IPCC 2006 GHG Inventories software. Representatives of Brazil, and Ecuador presented on their national experiences in developing national  GHG inventory processes.

The workshop included interactive roundtables on climate change, mitigation and adaptation, the requirements of countries to develop inventories in the agriculture sector, and the resolution of problems to improve national GHG Inventory systems especially in light of the UNFCCC decision on biennial update reports (BUR). In Doha, COP 18 decided that countries should provide biennial update reports of their GHG inventories to supplement the inventories in their National Communications.

The representatives of the FAO and the IPCC agreed that a similar workshop could be delivered to the Members of CARICOM upon their request. The Centre will undertake consultations with the climate change authorities in these countries..

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