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Caribbean Aqua-Terrestrial Solutions Launched in Grenada; 7 countries to follow

GIZGrenada’s Ministry of Agriculture, Lands, Forestry, Fisheries & Environment launched the Caribbean AquaTerrestrial Solutions (CATS) programme last week (November 22, 2013).

The launch featured the official handing over of various equipment by the German Ambassador Stefan Schlüter to the Hon. Roland Bhola, Minister of Agriculture, Lands, Forestry, Fisheries & Environment, a highly informative and lively presentation by MPA Coordinator Roland Baldeo on the work of the Molinière-Beauséjour Marine Protected Area (MPA), and the opening of the new MPA administrative office. There was also a lionfish information display, featuring live lionfish aquarium and delicious lionfish tasting!

CATS is an umbrella program that follows a ‘Ridge-to-Reef Approach’ by bringing together two topical projects, namely one on “Adaptation of Rural Economies and Natural Resources to Climate Change”, and the other on the “Management of Coastal Resources and Conservation of Marine Biodiversity”.

In the case of CATS, the ‘Concept of Herding CATS’ has been adopted, which will aid the region to effectively coordinate the support provided by various International Development Partners (IDP) and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO).

CATS is a regional development cooperation program between the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) and the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany. The implementing agencies are the Environmental Health and Management Unit of the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) and the German Government’s Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ). The program will soon operate in eight CARICOM Member States from Guyana, Grenada, St. Vincent & Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis, Jamaica and Belize.

Regional Workshop on Climate Change Impacts in Mountainous Regions of Latin America and the Caribbean

Credit: Google

Credit: Google

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre delivered a presentation on the Caribbean’s regional approach to address the issues of climate change, highlighting the Centre’s initiative in Dominica’s Morne Diablotin National Park and Morne Trois Pitons National Park World Heritage Site at the Regional Workshop on Climate Change Impacts in Mountainous Regions of Latin America and the Caribbean.

The workshop was held in San Jose, Costa Rica August 21 to 23. It was the second in a series of three regional workshops being organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The first workshop was held earlier this year in Nepal for the Asia region. The third will be held next month in Nairobi, Kenya for the African region. A synthesis workshop will be convened in Paris in January 2014.

The workshops are a part of UNESCO’s Programme on Climate Change in Mountainous Regions and are providing inputs into a Global Overview Paper commissioned by UNESCO as well as a Policy Brief to be drafted for policy advisors and decision makers. The main purposes of the documents are to:

  • Define mountain resources  in the context of ecosystem services
  • Define key regional differences and similarities
  • Review potential climate change threats to mountain ecosystems, particularly water resources
  • Examine adaptation strategies utilizing ecosystem services.

Ms Shermaine Clauzel of the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) also did a presentation, which looked at “Protecting and Valuing Watershed Services and Developing Management Initiatives in the Ford D’Or Watershed Area of Saint Lucia”. Ms Judy Clarke of CaribSave was the other Caribbean participant at the workshop, which drew representation from international and regional agencies from North, Central and South America. The UNESCO International Hydrological Programme (IHP), the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Alliance for Mountains and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) also assisted in the organization of the workshop.

5Cs to continue a broader mix of regional and national climate change projects

Credit: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Not for use without written permission.

Credit: Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Not for use without written permission.

The Board of Governors of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre concluded its annual meeting (August 22 -24) in Belize yesterday.  Among the key decisions taken, the Centre will continue to pursue a broader mix of regional and national projects and actions, advance efforts to boost its institutional capacity, and expand its collaborative work with the various economic and social sectors, including health, renewable energy and youth.

Regional and National Tracks

Chairman of the Board Dr Leonard Nurse  says the Centre’s primary focus on a combination of regional and national (dual track) climate change activities is consistent with its regional mandate. This mandate is outlined in the Regional Framework and its accompanying Implementation Plan, which was approved by CARICOM Heads of Governments last year. The dual track approach “allows us to enhance the region’s resilience, so that we can minimize the impact of climate change on certain critical sectors, including agriculture, fisheries, tourism and others, that underpin the economic viability of the region”.

The Chairman notes that the Centre is already strategically developing and implementing dual track initiatives that address the priorities outlined in the Regional Framework and accompanying Implementation Plan— among them is the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank-funded Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience (PPCR) and the Caribbean component of the Intra-ACP Global Climate Change Alliance programme, which is supported by the European Union. Under the PPCR initiative, the Centre will be working with the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) to better understand the linkages between climate change and human health.

The Caribbean Regional Framework

The Caribbean Regional Framework

Institutional Capacity

The Centre has expanded rapidly having developed the capacity to successfully execute a suite of regional climate change programmes worth between US$40 and US$50 million over the last five years. Pilot projects such as the installation of a Reverse Osmosis Plant in Bequia using solar energy (photovoltaic) have improved access to potable water. Elements of this project are being replicated across the region— Petite Martinique, Carriacou (both dependencies of Grenada), Belize, Barbados and The Bahamas. These successes have resulted in increased demand for the Centre’s services.

Executive Director Dr Kenrick Leslie says the Centre was directed by CARICOM Heads to “work with national governments to put together programmes that would help them develop bankable projects that can be funded under the various mechanisms under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Therefore, the Centre is putting maximum effort to ensure CARICOM Member States get their fair share of the financial resources available through the Green Climate Fund, Adaptation Fund and other funds to help them in their adaptation efforts. That is our primary thrust— to meet the mandate given to us by the regional Heads [last year].”

Accordingly, the Centre is strengthening its capacity by consolidating the work of its Monitoring and Evaluation Unit to better prepare it to function as an implementing agency. This will enable the Centre to access resources to implement programmes that are now largely within the remit of globally recognized institutions. The Centre’s expanded M&E Unit will assist regional governments in developing, monitoring and evaluating programmes. The Board has also unveiled plans to strengthen its fiduciary oversight through initiatives such as more frequent financial reporting,  a Finance and Audit Sub-Committee of the Board of Governors, an internal audit function for the Centre and increased focus on data and plant security.

Dr Nurse says these actions are necessary given the Centre’s shift from a project based orientation to more programmatic activities. He notes that the Centre, which is primarily funded through grants, is advancing efforts to complete the establishment of a Trust Fund. The Fund, which has been seeded with a grant from the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, will be managed by a Board of Trustees external to the Centre. The Trust Fund will be a vital component of the Centre’s thrust to ensure its financial sustainability.

Learn more: CCCCC (2012) Delivering Transformational Change 2011-21. Implementing the CARICOM Regional Framework for Achieving Development Resilient to Climate Change.

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