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CCCCC Supports Jamaica in Climate Change Dialogue

Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Daryl Vaz (centre), displays a signed copy of the Instrument of Ratification of the Paris Agreement on climate change during a seminar at the Terra Nova All-Suite Hotel in St Andrew on April 11. Others sharing the moment (from left) are Deputy Resident Representative, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Elsie Laurence Chounoune; and Principal Director, Climate Change Division, Una-May Gordon. The Paris Agreement, which was adopted at the Climate Change Summit in Paris in December 2015, signals the commitment of the international community to combat climate change and its wide-ranging effects. (Photo: JIS)

The Climate Change Division of the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation of Jamaica is undertaking a public outreach entitled “Uncut Conversations on Climate Change: Dialogue for the Future” at the Terra Nova Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica from 11 to 13 April 2017. The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has been invited to participate in the event. Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer, was the lead conversationalist on the opening day on the theme “Come on People, COP is the Conference of the Parties”. He explained the international climate change negotiation process under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The Executive Director of the CCCCC, Dr Kenrick Leslie, will participate on Day 2 of the event as the lead conversationalist for “What did Small Island Developing States Give Up or Gain by Signing and Ratifying the Paris Agreement”.

In his opening address, the Honourable Daryl Vaz announced that the Government of Jamaica had ratified the Paris Agreement. This was greeted with applause by the audience which consisted on students and representatives of the media, government agencies, the private sector and the NGO community. Among the subjects being covered in the Conversations are: the Paris Agreement, adaption, mitigation, capacity building, finance, and technology.

Minister Vaz urged everyone to become advocates for ‘Mother Earth’ and work hard to preserve and protect her for the next generation. He urged Jamaicans to take proactive steps such as practising proper disposal of garbage, carpooling to reduce the carbon footprint, and conserving and recycling water, as well as incorporating climate-smart agriculture, to adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

“In all we do, we need to enable and empower the poorest and most vulnerable among us, including our women and children, to adapt to and cope with some of the intense and often devastating weather conditions associated with climate change,” he said.

The private sector and the NGO community also lead conversations. The event will culminate with the measures Jamaica is undertaking to respond to climate change.

The National Water Commission, Forestry Department, National Environment and Planning Agency, Adaptation Programme and Financing Mechanism, Meteorological Services Division, Rural Agricultural Development Authority and the Climate Change Division mounted exhibits at the event.

CCCCC Participates in an Energy of Nature vs Nature of Energy Conference

Photo Courtesy of: WWF

Photo Courtesy of: WWF

 

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre delivered a presentation on Belize and the International Response to Climate Change at the Second Part of the Energy of nature vs the Nature of Energy Conference Series which was held at the Radisson Fort George Hotel in Belize City, Belize on 27 July 2016. Fuller’s presentation focused on Belize’s vulnerability to climate change, the international response to climate change and Belize’s contribution to the Paris Agreement. Carolyn-Trench Sandiford spoke about the importance of planning to adapt to climate change. Roberto Pott delivered a presentation on the impacts of climate change on Belize’s coastal and marine resources while Ansel Dubon spoke about Belize’s efforts to transition to renewable energy. The guest speaker was Dr. Patricia Majluf, Vice President of Oceana Peru, who provided reflections on the impacts of climate change on Peru’s fishing industry.

Photo Courtesy of: WWF

Photo Courtesy of: WWF

The conference was opened by the Honourable Omar Figueroa, the Minister of Sate in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Environment and Sustainable Development in Belize. The conference was organized by Oceana Belize and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

CARICOM Negotiators Playing Major Role in Bonn Climate Change Talks

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer (CCCCC) and Chairman of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA). Photo courtesy Ann Gordon

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer (CCCCC) and Chairman of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA). Photo courtesy of Ann Gordon

Countries are now in their second week of negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) presently taking place in Bonn, Germany. Draft conclusions have already been adopted for some items under two of the subsidiary bodies of the Convention, the Subsidiary Body on Implementation (SBI) and the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA). Under the SBSTA, countries concluded their consideration under the Nairobi Work Programme (NWP) on adaptation, the Technology framework, metrics to calculate the carbon dioxide equivalence of greenhouse gases, emissions from international aviation and shipping, the training programme for review experts, forests in exhaustion, market and non-market mechanisms under the Convention and the Paris Agreement, modalities for accounting of financial resources mobilized for climate change, and the next review of the long term goal until 2018.

CARICOM negotiators are facilitating the consultations on several of the agenda items under the SBI and SBSTA. They include: Ann Gordon of Belize on Research and Systematic Observations, Hugh Sealy of Grenada market and non-market mechanisms under the Paris Agreement, Gerald Lindo of Jamaica on joint implementation, Kishan Kumarsingh of Trinidad and Tobago on Technology, Crispin d’Auvergne of Saint Lucia on capacity building, and Leon Charles of Grenada on the long term review of the global goal. Carlos Fuller, the Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, is the Chair of the SBSTA.

Pre-sessional Meetings Being Held Prior to Bonn Climate Change Talks

Bonn Climate Change Conference  Photo Credit: (UNFCCC)

Bonn Climate Change Conference
Photo Credit: (UNFCCC)

 

Major groups of countries are engaged in preparatory talks among themselves prior to the opening of the Meetings of the Subsidiary Bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change on Monday, May 16. These groups include the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) and the Group of 77 (G77) and China. The Member States of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) are Members of these two groups. The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre is being represented at the meetings by Carlos Fuller, the International and Regional Liaison Officer who is the Chairman of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA). Mr. Fuller has met with several of the negotiating groups over the past three days to advise them on how he proposes to conduct the SBSTA session. These include the Least Developed Countries (LDCs), the African Group, AOSIS, and the Like Minded Developing Countries (LMDCs). He also met with the Chairman of the G77. On Saturday, May 14th, he met with Members of the Bolivarian Alliance (ALBA) and the Arab States. The pre-sessional meetings will continued on Sunday.

CCCCC Represented at Bonn Climate Change Talks

Bonn Climate Change Conference Photo Credit: (UNFCCC)

Bonn Climate Change Conference
Photo Credit: (UNFCCC)

 

Mr Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer, is representing the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) at the meetings of the Subsidiary Bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to be held in Bonn, Germany from 16 to 26 May 2016.

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer (CCCCC)

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer (CCCCC)

 

Mr. Fuller was elected as the Chairman of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP 21) held in Paris, France this past December. He will hold the post for one year. The other two subsidiary bodies which will be meeting in Bonn are the Subsidiary Body on Implementation (SBI) and the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement (APA). On Wednesday, May 11th, 2016 Mr. Fuller met with the delegations representing the Least Developed Countries (LDC) to brief them on how he proposed to conduct the work of the SBSTA at the session. He will provide similar briefings to the other negotiating groups on Friday, Saturday and Sunday prior to the opening of the negotiating sessions on Monday.

 

Longstanding CARICOM Negotiator on Climate Change Reflects on the UNFCCC’s 20th Anniversary

Carlos Fuller

Carlos Fuller

Today, Friday, 21 March 2014, marks the 20th anniversary of the entry into force of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. As we celebrate the landmark Convention and the investment in its implementation over the last two decades, Caribbean Climate, the region’s premier climate change focused blog, asked Carlos Fuller, a long-standing Caribbean negotiator who now functions as the International and Regional Liaison Officer at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, to reflect on this milestone. His comments are featured below.

Having been involved in the climate change negotiation process since its inception, I look back at the past 20 years with mixed emotions. I have witnessed first-hand the assimilation of vague ideas on the elements of a climate change agreement which were crafted into a Convention with perhaps too rigid elements that have hindered the actions required to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases instead of facilitating a process which would have produced the change in productive and consumption patterns to address the causes of climate change. Nevertheless, a series of decisions including the development and adoption of the Kyoto Protocol provided the impetus for a small group of countries to reduce their emissions and have raised the awareness among a significant segment of the population that the world must take action to cope with a changing climate.

The Caribbean has certainly benefited from the process. All CARICOM States are now aware of the threat climate change poses to the region. Institutional processes have been established in the region in response to the threat including the establishment of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre which is mandated to coordinate the region’s response to climate change, the development of a Master of Science programme in climate change in CEREMES at the Cave Hill Campus of the University of the West Indies and the creation of the Climate Change Impacts Group at the Moina Campus of UWI among others. The region has attracted over US$100 million in funding to enhance its capacity to address climate change, to assess the impacts of climate change on the region, to asses the region’s vulnerability and to undertake action to reduce that vulnerability. Unfortunately, the region has emulated the example of the international community and has not undertaken the transformational changes that will make the region resilient to climate change.

The region and the international community have another chance to get it right. The global community has embarked on a process to develop a new climate change agreement which should be finalized in Paris in December 2015 and which will come into effect in 2020. That agreement must stimulate all countries to contribute to an international effort to drastically reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and provide the financial and technical support to adapt to the impacts of climate change. The next two years  will be especially crucial as the international community seeks to craft a global agreement that involves all actors (developed, developing, LDC’s etc.) in a massive effort to keep global temperature increase below the 2 deg. C mark and for the capitalisation of the Green Climate Fund at a level that ensures adequate resources are available to allow significant implementation of Adaptation measures in CARICOM and other developing countries.

5Cs Participates in First Meeting of the GFCS Africa/ACP Task Team

Carlos Meeting

Carlos Fuller (2nd Left) at the First Meeting of the GFCS Africa/ACP Task Team

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre participated in the recently concluded (December 2-4, 2013) First Meeting of the GFCS Africa/ACP Task Team at the EUMETSAT Headquarters in Darmstadt, Germany.

The meeting contemplated the way forward for implementation of the Addis Ababa Declaration in Support of the Implementation of the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) in Africa, and possibly in the Caribbean and the Pacific.

Participants at the meeting included representatives of the Regional Economic Communities, Regional Climate Centres, the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Secretariat, the European Community, the World Meteorological Organization and the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environmental Programme (SPREP). The participants, including Carlos Fuller, the Centre’s International and Regional Liaison Officer, explained the activities in their regions related to the preparation and delivery of climate services.

Outcomes:
  • A project concept note on an inter-regional GFCS for Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific will be prepared and be ready for submission to the European Union for funding under the 11th European Development Fund (EDF).

The project is expected to strengthen the capacity of regional and national agencies in the preparation and delivery of climate services to their Member States.

  • The Terms of the Reference of the Task Team was finalized and adopted.

The next meeting would be held in the second quarter of 2014.

Regional Workshop on Climate Change Impacts in Mountainous Regions of Latin America and the Caribbean

Credit: Google

Credit: Google

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre delivered a presentation on the Caribbean’s regional approach to address the issues of climate change, highlighting the Centre’s initiative in Dominica’s Morne Diablotin National Park and Morne Trois Pitons National Park World Heritage Site at the Regional Workshop on Climate Change Impacts in Mountainous Regions of Latin America and the Caribbean.

The workshop was held in San Jose, Costa Rica August 21 to 23. It was the second in a series of three regional workshops being organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The first workshop was held earlier this year in Nepal for the Asia region. The third will be held next month in Nairobi, Kenya for the African region. A synthesis workshop will be convened in Paris in January 2014.

The workshops are a part of UNESCO’s Programme on Climate Change in Mountainous Regions and are providing inputs into a Global Overview Paper commissioned by UNESCO as well as a Policy Brief to be drafted for policy advisors and decision makers. The main purposes of the documents are to:

  • Define mountain resources  in the context of ecosystem services
  • Define key regional differences and similarities
  • Review potential climate change threats to mountain ecosystems, particularly water resources
  • Examine adaptation strategies utilizing ecosystem services.

Ms Shermaine Clauzel of the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) also did a presentation, which looked at “Protecting and Valuing Watershed Services and Developing Management Initiatives in the Ford D’Or Watershed Area of Saint Lucia”. Ms Judy Clarke of CaribSave was the other Caribbean participant at the workshop, which drew representation from international and regional agencies from North, Central and South America. The UNESCO International Hydrological Programme (IHP), the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Alliance for Mountains and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) also assisted in the organization of the workshop.

32nd Session of the UNFCCC JISC Concluded

The Caribbean Regional Framework

The Caribbean Regional Framework

The 32nd Session of the Joint Implementation Supervisory Committee (JISC) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has ended. Mr Carlos Fuller, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre’s International and Regional Liaison Officer,  participated in the recently concluded (June 17 and 18) event in Bonn, Germany. Mr Fuller functioned as the alternate member of the Latin America and Caribbean Regional Group (GRULAC).

The JISC is chaired by Mr Derreck Oderson of Barbados, who is also the substantive member of the Small Island States (SIDS) grouping. JISC is the body established by the meeting of the Parties of the Kyoto Protocol (CMP) to provide oversight over joint implementation (JI) projects. Joint Implementation is one of the flexibility mechanisms established by the Kyoto Protocol that enables carbon credits to be generated by investments in projects, which reduce emissions of greenhouse gases in developed countries. The CDM on the other hand, generates credits by implementing projects in developing countries.

At present there are two tracks that countries can use to implement JI projects. Under Track 1, the host country supervises all aspects of the project. If a country decides to utilize the Track 2 approach, the project is supervised by the JISC which has the authority to approve and reject projects if it does not meet prescribed criteria.

During the past year and at this session the JISC has been drafting recommendations for the CMP to improve the efficiency of the carbon market. Among the recommendations it will make in Warsaw, Poland are:

  1. To have one track for JI projects,
  2. To establish an international accreditation system for the entire carbon market,
  3. To set mandatory guidance for countries hosting JI projects, and
  4. To develop measures for the establishment of emission baselines and procedures to demonstrate additionality.

These recommendations will be finalized at the next session of the JISC scheduled to be held in Bonn in late September 2013.

5C’s Carlos Fuller Delivers Keynote Address on Agriculture & Climate Change

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liasion Officer

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liasion Officer

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre’s International and Regional Liaison Officer, Mr. Carlos Fuller, was the guest speaker at a National Consultation on Agriculture and Climate Change in Barbados  last week (June 7, 2013). The event was convened by the Caribbean Agriculture Research and Development Institute (CARDI).

Mr Fuller discussed the science of climate change, the impacts on agriculture in the Caribbean and the Centre’s efforts to reduce the negative impacts of climate change. He noted that  studies show that a two degree increase in temperature  and a change in rainfall of +/- 20% could result in a decline of beans in Belize by 14  and 19%, rice by 10 and 14 % and corn by 22 and 17 %. In sugarcane and citrus, an increase in temperature of one degree by 2028 and 2.5 degrees by 2050, sugar cane would decline by 112 and 17% and citrus by 3 and 5%.

Mr Fuller’s wide-ranging presentation included a look at the landmark Implementation Plan, which was approved by the CARICOM Heads of Government in 2012, and a review of the work being done by the Centre: namely conducting training workshops for CARICOM agriculture officials in Guyana in 2008, and for CARDI officials in Trinidad in 2009. Following the keynote presentation,  Mr Fuller and Dr. Cyril Roberts, CARDI Country Representative,  facilitated dialogue among the representatives, which included officials from the Ministry of Agriculture and private sector consultants.

The Barbados national consultation is the first of a series being organized by CARDI to raise the awareness of the agricultural communities in CARICOM Member States about the impact of climate change on the sector. The initiative is being funded by the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), which was established in 1983 under the Lome Convention between the Africa, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries and the European Union (EU).

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