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National Training Workshop on Climate Change Impacts Tools

PRESS RELEASE – Belmopan, Belize; November 24, 2017 – The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC/5Cs) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in collaboration with Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment and Sustainable Development and Immigration through the National Climate Change Office (NCCO) is hosting a national training on the Caribbean Weather Impacts Group (CARIWIG) Portal and Climate Change Impacts Tools. This training workshop is being funded by the Japan-Caribbean Climate Change Partnership (J-CCCP) project. The training will be held over a period of 9 days; the first segment of the training is scheduled for the week of November 27th to December 1st, 2017, while the second segment will be held from January 15th to 18th, 2018 at the George Price Center, Belmopan City, Belize.

Participants of the National Training Workshop, Belize.

The Weather Generator (WG), the Tropical Storm Model / Simple Model for the Advection of Storms and Hurricanes (TSM/SMASH), the Caribbean Drought Assessment Tool (CARiDRO) and accompanying web portal and data sets are specific climate change impacts tools aimed at assisting in the generation of scientific information and analysis to help in making informed decisions along with policy formulation and implementation.

The tools are open source online resources to provide locally relevant and unbiased climate change information that is specific to the Caribbean and relevant to the region’s development. Case studies focused on areas such as drought, agriculture, water resources, coastal zone structures, health (dengue fever), and urban development and flooding were also done to test these tools and information related to these case studies will be shared during the Training along with many other interactive sessions. The integration of the tools into national policy agendas across the region is being spearheaded through regional and country workshops, which are crucial to ensuring effective decision-making and improving climate knowledge and action.

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Caribbean Weather Impacts Group (CARIWIG) Tools and Portal

Brief Description

  1.       A weather generator has been developed and tested on present day meteorological station observations in the region and found to produce reasonable simulations of both average and extreme weather properties. This tool provides the basis for weather generator based downscaling, required to generate locally relevant bias corrected weather scenarios for impact studies.
  2.      A new tropical storm model has been developed to provide spatial 15-minute scenarios of rainfall and wind speed over Caribbean islands under various scenarios of track, category, movement speed and historic notable storm. Managers may consider such scenarios as part of hazard management. Case study results suggest that hurricane speed, an under-reported metric, is actually of key importance, and that near-misses may be more hazardous than previously supposed.
  3.     The CARiDRO tool has been developed to assist the evaluation of meteorological and hydrological drought for the Caribbean and Central American regions, for both present day and future climate projections. This tool greatly simplifies standard but complex analyses and automatically generates a number of graphical outputs (e.g. time series plots and maps). This tool will support the agriculture and water resource sectors in their assessment and adaptation to drought hazard. A case study verified the CARiDRO tool identification of a region-wide historic drought, and found that future projections indicated increasing regional drought frequency.

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The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change. We maintain the Caribbean’s most extensive repository of information and data on climate change specific to the region, which in part enables us to provide climate change-related policy advice and guidelines to CARICOM member states through the CARICOM Secretariat. In this role, the Centre is recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Environment Programme, and other international agencies as the focal point for climate change issues in the Caribbean. The Centre is also a United Nations Institute for Training and Research recognised Centre of Excellence, one of an elite few. Learn more about how we’re working to make the Caribbean more climate resilient by perusing The Implementation Plan.

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Energy Awareness Fair 2017 – RE-Thinking Energy: Shaping a Resilient Community

The Ministry of Public Service, Energy and Public Utilities announces the hosting of Belize’s Energy Week 2017 during the week of November 19 -25 under the observance of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM)’s Energy Month 2017. The Energy Unit within the Ministry of Public Service, Energy and Public Utilities is hosting its 2017 Energy Awareness Fair today, November 23, at the Best Western Biltmore Plaza from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has been invited to participate in the Energy Awareness Fair being celebrated under the theme “RE-Thinking Energy: Shaping a Resilient Community“.

Belize’s Energy Awareness Fair aims to foster stakeholder engagement and the exchange of ideas for appropriate energy related issues in Belize and sensitize the public about Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency and access to clean and alternative modern forms of energy.

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GWP-C WACDEP Initiative on Climate-Proofing Water Investment in the Caribbean

The Global Water Partnership-Caribbean (GWP-C) has embarked on a new initiative under its Water, Climate and Development Programme (WACDEP) called “Climate-Proofing Water Investment in the Caribbean” which is being executed in partnership with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC).

The initiative includes the development of a Caribbean Climate Resilience and Water Security Investment Framework and Financing Plan (CReWSIP) which aims to provide a coordinated and programmatic approach to identifying, prioritising and sourcing finance for actions to enhance the climate resilience of the Caribbean through improved water resources management. The project is being funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) and falls within one of the key components of the GWP-C WACDEP which recognises the need to prioritise water investments which perform well under a full range of climate scenarios. Get more details on the initiative by downloading a Stakeholder Briefing Note here.

Also, we encourage you to share your feedback and comments with us at knowledgeplatform@gwp-caribbean.org.

The Caribbean Science Series, Volume 1: 1.5 degree – New Findings on Implications for the Caribbean

Today, Monday, November 13, 2017, in Bonn, Germany at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)’s 23rd Conference of the Party (COP23), Caribbean leaders present new findings from the 1.5-degree Research into the implications of the Caribbean. Dr. Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) moderates the region’s side event, 1.5 degree imperative for the Caribbean. Dr. Leslie is joined by Dr. William Warren Smith, President of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB); Allen Chastanet, Prime Ministers of Saint Lucia; Keith Mitchell, Prime Minister of Grenada; Professor Michael Taylor of the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona; and Dr. Abel Centilla of INSMET. The findings are presented here in the region’s newest publication: The Caribbean Science Series, Volume 1.

PRESS RELEASE – “1 point 5 to stay alive”, the Caribbean speaks to the world at global Climate Change Conference

PRESS RELEASE – Bonn, Germany. 13 November 2017.  “1 point 5 to stay alive”, the Caribbean speaks to the world at global Climate Change Conference

“1.5 is a matter of necessity,” said University of the West Indies’ Professor Michael Taylor, speaking at an event convened by the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) as part of the Conference on Climate Change, COP23, taking place in Germany until the end of this week.

Prof. Taylor was at the time delivering the main results of a study funded by the CDB, a study that has brought together 45 Caribbean scientists from 11 regional institutions to examine and compare the implications of climate change for the region.

The facts speak for themselves. On average, the temperature on this planet has already increased by 1 degree Celsius over what it was before the world began to industrialise, and the impacts of that increase are there for all to see.

In the Caribbean, global warming has already resulted in more intense hurricanes with stronger winds and much more rain, but it is also responsible: for increases in both air and ocean temperature; for more very hot days and nights; for longer and more frequent periods of drought; for an increase in very heavy rainfall events; and for sea-level rise and coastal erosion.

Climate change is real, and things can only get worse, but the question is: how much worse? This is the question that was at the centre of the climate change negotiations in Paris two years ago, and this is why the Caribbean considered it a success that the Paris Agreement made a commitment to an increase of “not more than 2 degrees”, trying to achieve the target of 1.5 degrees.

“This 1.5 Caribbean project,” said Prof. Taylor, “is the region doing its own science, putting Caribbean science in the literature of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).”

And the messages from that research are clear. With ‘business as usual’, temperatures will increase by at least 2.5 degrees by the end of the century, reaching 1.5 degrees in the late 2020s, and 2 degrees in the 2050s.

“At 2 degrees, we would have a significantly harsher climate. We would be moving into the realm of the unprecedented. It’s a matter of compromise,” said Prof. Taylor, “even a 1.5 degree temperature increase will be very problematic.”

The message that the Caribbean is giving at the UN Conference is therefore one of urgency, a message that was echoed by Saint Lucian Prime Minister Allen Chastanet, who spoke at the session and who is attending the Conference in his capacity as CARICOM Lead on Sustainable Development and Climate Change.

“The Caribbean and other small island developing states (SIDS) have been patiently waiting for the world to get its act together,” said PM Chastanet, “but we now need action; we don’t have the ability to wait any longer, we need investment to build our resilience. Financing is a major constraint, and we now need a dedicated source of funds to support resilience building, specifically for the SIDS”.

The need for accessible and appropriate financing was also stressed by Dr. Keith Mitchell, Prime Minister of Grenada and current Chairman of CARICOM, who declared that “we need funding for adaptation but, with the projected impact of a 1.5 increase, adaptation is not enough, thus our call for a more comprehensive regime on Loss and Damage.”

“Since the Climate Change Conference of 2009 in Copenhagen, when the message of 1 point 5 to stay alive was first sent out, the Caribbean has been advocating that a target of 1.5 degrees is both necessary and feasible,” said Dr Kenrick Leslie, the Executive Director of the CCCCC.

At the Bonn Conference this year, thanks to the work of Prof. Taylor and other Caribbean scientists, and to the tireless work of Caribbean delegates in these critical negotiations, this message is coming across even louder and stronger, backed by the highly credible scientific work of the region’s scientific community.

For more information, contact climate.justice@panoscaribbean.org and visit www.1point5.info and https://www.facebook.com/savethecaribbean/

Confronting the 1.5 Degree Challenge and Accelerating NDC Implementation in the Caribbean

On Monday, November 13th at 1:15 pm, the region will host a side event on the 1.5 vs 2 degree paper prepared by Professor Michael Taylor of the University of West Indies, Mona Campus. Professor Taylor will be joined by high-level representatives, including members from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and regional Prime Ministers to present on the importance of 1.5 degree for the survival of the region. This 45 minute side event will be followed by a 45 minute event to present the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) Financing Initiative.

 

Confronting the 1.5 Degree Challenge and Accelerating NDC Implementation in the Caribbean

Joint Side Event to highlight the high vulnerability of Caribbean Countries to the impacts of climate change, as well as their commitment and leadership in addressing climate change. In the context of this side event, the Caribbean NDC Financing Initiative will be introduced.

Monday, 13 Nov 2017
13:15—14:45
Meeting Room 9

Speakers:

  • Ministerial representation from Caribbean countries;
  • President of the Caribbean Development Bank;
  • University of the West Indies;
  • Organization of Eastern Caribbean States;
  • Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre;
  • GIZ Germany;
  • NDC Partnership;
  • the UNFCCC Secretariat.

High-level Conference to mobilize resources for hurricane-ravaged CARICOM States coming in November

PRESS RELEASE – (CARICOM Secretariat, Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown, Guyana) The Caribbean Community (CARICOM), with support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), will hold a High-level Donor Conference on  21 November at UN Headquarters in New York to mobilise international resources for its Members devastated by Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

This initiative is aimed at rebuilding the devastated Members as the first climate resilient countries in the world and helping the wider CARICOM Region improve its resilience.  International Development Partners, friendly countries, NGOs, prominent personalities, private sector entities and Foundations have been invited.  CARICOM Heads of Government and the Secretaries-General of CARICOM and the United Nations will also participate.

The powerful category 5 hurricanes Irma and Maria hit the Region in September causing a number of deaths and widespread devastation in CARICOM Member States and Associate Members.  Irma, with wind gusts of over 230 mph, damaged or destroyed more than 90 percent of the buildings on Barbuda – the sister island of Antigua – leading to the complete evacuation of the island; and between 60 and 90 percent in Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands, the southern family islands in The Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands. Haiti and St. Kitts and Nevis were also affected.  Maria passed two weeks later, hitting Dominica with such fury, Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit was prompted to declare that “Dominica is pure devastation”.

CARICOM, through the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) has been at the forefront of the immediate relief effort. Member States, private sector companies and public spirited individuals have contributed significant quantities of relief supplies. Several countries have also contributed security personnel, health professionals and utility repair experts, among others. CARICOM Chairman, Prime Minister Dr Keith Mitchell of Grenada and Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque led assessment teams to badly affect islands.

Given the level of devastation and in anticipation that the frequency and intensity will become the new normal, the Region has recognised the need to build back better for improved resilience.

November’s Donor Conference also comes against the backdrop that the impacted countries are Caribbean Small Island and Low-lying Coastal Developing States (SIDS) with inherent vulnerabilities.  Most have also  been made ineligible for concessional financing from major donors which have categorised them as middle to high income countries.

Credit: CARICOM Secretariat - Press Release Announcing Conference

Nicaragua signs the Paris Agreement while UN urges the world to upscale climate policies

A month after Nicaragua announced its intention to join the Paris Agreement, the country officially committed to the landmark climate accord, – one day after UNFCCC published a new report urging policymakers to upscale existing and new climate policies in order for the Paris goals to be met.

President Daniel Ortega had announced his plans to sign the Paris Agreement last month, during a meeting with a delegation of Senior Executives from the World Bank.

Nicaragua’s Nationally Determined Contributions haven’t been submitted yet, but the country is already considered a renewable energy paradise, as it currently produces more than 50 percent of its power needs from clean energy and aims to increase this to 90 percent by 2020.

Rosario Murillo, Nicaragua’s Vice President and First Lady commented that the Paris Agreement “is the only instrument we have in the world that allows the unity of intentions and efforts to face up to climate change and natural disasters”.

Nicaragua constitutes a developing country, which is however threated disproportionally from the impacts of climate change like extreme weather events and it is particularly vulnerable to hurricanes.

In 2015, it refused to sign the Paris accord as it claimed the Agreement was too weak and it did not protect developing countries from climate change.

However, President Daniel Ortega decided that Nicaragua’s decision to join the Agreement will be done in support of these nations.

He had said: “We have to be in solidarity with this large number of countries that are the first victims, who are already the victims and are the ones who will continue to suffer the impact of these disasters and that are countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, of the Caribbean, which are in highly vulnerable areas”.

To date, 169 countries have ratified the agreement and 165 countries have submitted their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs).

On Monday, UNFCCC published its “Climate Action Now: Summary for Policymakers 2017” based on recommendations from the Technical Expert Meetings on climate change mitigation and adaptation held in May 2017 in Bonn, and as part of the Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action that is working to support INDCs and National Climate Action Plans.

The report shed light on the importance of coordination and coherence of all three global agendas related to climate change, i.e. the Paris Agreement, the UN SDGs, and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.

For example, climate change mitigation action can bring co-benefits for adaptation and sustainable development; renewables can increase access to electricity as well as reduce emissions and more efficient and sustainable agriculture and forestry can contribute to adaptation too.

In addition, it stressed the importance of data and information availability, as a lot of data about the impacts of climate change and the associated risks are not available for many countries.

The report also mentions the complexity of measuring and verifying emissions from agriculture, forestry and other land use, stressing that this needs to be addressed soon.

You can read the full “Climate Action Now: Summary for Policymakers 2017” report here.

Credit: Climate Action Programme

LAC Carbon Forum Stresses Cooperation Among non-State Actors for Success of Paris Agreement

Participants at the eleventh Latin American and Caribbean Carbon Forum (LACCF) have underlined the importance of commitments by “new actors,” such as cities and local, tribal or state governments in achieving the objective of the Paris Agreement on climate change to keep global average temperature rise well below 2 °C and as close as possible to 1.5 °C.

In his closing remarks, former Mexican President Philippe Calderón said the participation of sub-national and non-state actors could fill the gap between between current climate mitigation pledges by national governments and efforts required to achieve the objective of the Paris Agreement. He told participants that the shift towards new actors creates a “new vision in a politically adverse world,” noting the example of pledges by cities and businesses that are part of ‘We Are Still In,’ a network of more than 2,500 mayors, tribal leaders, CEOs and university presidents in the US committed to continued action in the face of the US withdrawal from the Paris Agreement.

Other speakers highlighted the need for continued efforts to decarbonize Latin American economies, noting that such endeavors cannot be achieved through isolated actions but require cooperation among many actors and mutual transparency. UNFCCC Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa underlined the role of private and public sectors working together to mobilize necessary investments.

Attended by more than 480 participants from 38 countries, LACCF 11 served as venue to inspire greater climate action in the LAC region. While its primary focus is on market mechanisms, carbon pricing, climate finance and the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), the event also provided an opportunity to discuss other forms of climate action and policies.

Co-organized by the Mexican Secretariat of Environment and Natural resources, UNFCCC, UNDP, the World Bank Group and many other partners, LACCF 11 was held 18-20 October 2017 in Mexico City, Mexico.

Credit: IISD SDG Knowledge Hub

Women’s Leadership is Driving Climate Action – Speech by Patricia Espinosa

Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary, UNFCCC

On the margins of ministerial meeting in Fiji, designed to the prepare the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn in November (COP23), the UN’s top climate change official Patricia Espinosa gave a speech on women’s leadership in climate action and sustainable development. The Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change said that COP23 provided an important opportunity to move forward on gender-related issues and gave an update on the Gender Action Plan of UN Climate Change. Read her address here:

Thank you for being here for an event that highlights women’s leadership in driving solutions to climate change.

And a special thank you to prime minister Bainimarama for extending his warm invitation to this event.

Together with support from Australia under the Women Delegates Fund your Government has been advancing the ability of women to play an ever increasing and important role in multilateral negotiations.

We also acknowledge Ambassador Khan of Fiji as an International Gender Champion and we look forward to welcoming more women negotiators into this family of expertise at COP 23 in Bonn.

Ladies and Gentlemen, here in Fiji, delegates are working to prepare for COP 23, where the attention of the world will be on Bonn, Germany and the next round of climate change negotiations.

While Paris represented one of those moments where the best of humanity achieved an agreement so important to our collective futures, Bonn represents how we will move forward to fulfill its promise.

Bonn also represents an important opportunity to move forward on gender-related issues.

Today I want to discuss three very specific items related to those issues.

First, I want to provide you with an update about the Gender Action Plan.

Second, I’ll highlight some of the work we’re doing—and what I’m specifically doing—at UN Climate Change to advance female representation in the negotiations process and beyond.

Finally, I’ll provide some interesting examples of how UN Climate Change is working to advance women’s leadership in driving solutions to climate change.

Before I do, however, I want to talk to you about the urgency of our task to address climate change.

Never has our work been more necessary. We see this with respect to the extreme weather events affecting almost every continent throughout the world.

Whether it’s hurricanes in the Caribbean, drought in the Sahel, or wildfires in western North America, it’s observably clear to many that the impacts of climate change are happening right now.

We feel compassion for those who have lost everything, including homes, jobs, and, in some cases, friends and family.

But it also emphasizes that we are running out of time to turn things around. To do so, we must significantly increase our efforts to reduce emissions and our carbon footprints.

Not tomorrow. Not five years from now—today. As we can plainly see, the weather won’t wait for us to act.

As Secretary-General Guterres was last week when he was in Barbuda to see the impact of Hurricane Irma:

“The link between climate change and the devastation we are witnessing is clear, and there is a collective responsibility of the international community to stop this suicidal development.”

If we are to get off that development path, if we are to make the changes needed, we must have unprecedented cooperation, coordination and confidence.

And women must be at the forefront.

It’s not opinion. It’s not aspiration. It’s a fact.

And it’s what signatories agreed to under the Paris Agreement.

The Agreement is clear. It states that when Parties take action to address climate change, they should respect, promote and consider gender equality and the empowerment of women.

It’s also stated in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.

We all know that promises without action, however, are empty.

That’s why we’ve been working hard on a number of fronts, beginning with the Gender Action Plan.

This was a plan requested by the COP in Marrakech last year, in order to support the implementation of gender-related decisions and mandates under the UN Climate Change Process.

This was a significant decision.

After all, we know that gender equality and empowerment of women and girls is key to the successful implementation of the three big agreements I just mentioned.

And there is compelling evidence that links the inclusion of women in climate policy and solutions with better results, economic growth and more sustainable outcomes.

I’m happy to report that we’ve had a number of workshops and informal meetings that has moved the Gender Action Plan forward recently, including a very successful meeting last month in Ottawa.

This built on previous informal consultations in the Hague, hosted by the governments of the Netherlands and Costa Rica.

At the meeting in Ottawa, participants—including UN Climate Change—worked through 75 activities identified during previous workshops.

The purpose was to try and make each as actionable as possible.

I’m pleased by the work that has been accomplished and, as a result, we fully expect that an action plan will be adopted at COP 23 in Bonn.

This, however, does not mean our work related to gender ends. Just like the Paris Agreement, the next step will be implementation—a step where we must define exactly what activities we’ll undertake and exactly how we’ll work together to achieve them.

In the meantime, we at UN Climate Change continue to call upon Parties to address gender imbalance within their delegations.

We continue to encourage them to increase the number of women being nominated and elected to constituted bodies. This is especially true of developed countries.

The fact remains that the only nationally-determined contributions that include references to gender or women are from developing countries.

Frankly, this isn’t good enough and must change.

We at the UNFCCC stand ready to work with all Parties to help them take action to increase the participation of women.

The good news is that, to date, more than 50 gender-related decisions have been adopted within the UNFCCC processes.

I have also personally been working on the gender front.

For example, I am very pleased to be a global mentor with the C40’s Women for Climate initiative—a group that conducts research on the links between gender, cities and climate change.

In June of this year, I was also fortunate to be offered the opportunity to join the International Gender Champions network and help empower more women leaders.

I am doing everything I can to create more space that gives women a voice.

As one of my commitments, I signed the panel parity pledge, meaning that I will request organizers of any event at which I am speaking to aim for gender balance among speakers in panel discussions. I plan to hold all organizations to account.

I want to ensure that when we talk about a topic as significant as climate change, women who are working in this field are provided an equal opportunity to share their knowledge and perspectives.

UN Climate Change’s own Momentum for Change initiative is also raising the visibility of women acting on climate change.

For those who don’t know it, Momentum for Change shines a light on some of the most innovative, scalable and practical examples of what people across the globe are doing to combat climate change.

We organize the projects under pillars, one of which is called Women For Results.

This year, for the first time, we have two separate focus areas under that pillar: one on women’s empowerment and one on women’s leadership. Let me share a few examples.

One project is called Waste to Wow, based in Italy.

It’s a woman-led, eco fashion business that addresses climate change while also providing jobs for disadvantaged female workers.

It does this by recycling high-quality fabric waste from fashion companies to produce women’s clothing collections.

More than 200,000 meters of fabric was recovered in 2016, reducing CO2 emissions by around 18,000 tonnes.

Another project from Belize is equally innovative.

A woman named Lisa Carne was Belize’s first female diving instructor in a male-dominated industry.

She decided to start a company called Fragments of Hope.

Through this company, she offers women subsidized training programs on marine tourism and lagoon ecology so that they can help restore coral reef habitats.

So far, 90,000 corals have been transferred from nurseries into nature in three different national parks and marine reserves.

There are two final projects under the Women For Results pillar: one project out of Ecuador that increases sustainable production of organic food through urban agriculture — the participants are mainly women…

…and an agricultural program for women farmers in Sudan that recognizes their crucial role as agents of change in improving food security.

The project, among other things, helps train women in conservation techniques and helps them access finance and markets.

These are all fantastic projects and shine a light on the leadership role women are playing with respect to building a cleaner and greener future.

They’re also examples of practical, hands-on solutions to climate change that are being implemented right now—solutions that will help not only women, but all people.

Finally, I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of you for your dedication, support and leadership with respect to advancing gender as part of the climate change process.

As I’ve discussed today, while we still have much to accomplish, we have made real progress. We need to continue that momentum.

Because these are days when we need the voices of women more than ever.

When it comes to climate change, we need women at the negotiating tables, in boardrooms and as the heads of businesses, in the streets and in the fields…

…not only having their voices heard about climate change, but making the key decisions that will lead to a better tomorrow for all.

I look forward to seeing many of you in Bonn and working with you in the future.

Thank you.

Credit: UNFCCC Newsroom
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