caribbeanclimate

Home » Posts tagged 'Belize'

Tag Archives: Belize

Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre at LAC Climate Week

Dr Elon Cadogan and Mr Carlos Fuller of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre attended the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) Climate Week in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil from 19 to 23 August 2019.

On Monday, Regional and International Liaison Officer, Carlos Fuller introduced the Integrated Global Greenhouse Gas System (IG3IS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) at a side event on “Science-Based Greenhouse Gas Emission Estimates in Support of National and Sub-National Climate Change Mitigation”. This was followed by presentations on two pilot projects utilizing the system in Recifre, Brazil and Mexico City, Mexico. He then spoke on the need for enhanced Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) at a Regional Dialogue on NDCs.

On Wednesday, he was a panelist at the opening of the Climate Week and then moderated a panel discussion which included Ms Lisa Morris Julian, the Mayor of Arima, Trinidad and Tobago, on “Mitigation and Vulnerability Hotspots” as part of  a session on “Pathways to a Low-Carbon and Resilient Future in Latin America and the Caribbean Urban Areas and Settlements”.  He then delivered a presentation on adaptation on the coastal zone of Belize and facilitated a panel discussion which followed.

Dr Elon Cadogan, the National Project Coordinator for the GCF-funded “Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados Project” delivered a presentation on the project at the Technical Expert Meeting – Mitigation (TEM-M) on “Circular Economy Solutions and Innovations in Water and Energy Management for the Agri-Food Chain”.

The Centre’s team utilized the opportunity to engage with CARICOM representatives attending the LAC Climate Week including officials from Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, St Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines and Trinidad and Tobago and other regional experts.

The 2020 Lac Climate Week will be held in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic.

National Teacher Training Workshops For Climate Change Education

PRESS RELEASE – Belmopan, Belize; August 1, 2019 – Today August 1, 2019 the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) kicked off a national training exercise that aims to prepare teachers at the primary and secondary level in Belize to better understand and deliver the complex concepts and uncommon terminologies of Climate Science and Climate Change to their young students.

The 1.5° Curriculum training which is being delivered in six two-day workshops, introduces the Centre’s four-unit 1.5° to Stay Alive Curriculum and helps teachers to use the concepts and resources to support STEM subjects. Areas covered by the Curriculum and accompanying materials are Unit 1- The Warming Climate, Unit 2 – Sea Level Rise, Unit 3 – Pine Forests, Unit 4 – Social Impacts of Global Warming and include worksheets, photographs, posters, suggestions for PowerPoint presentations, and videos.

The Curriculum and the Training sessions on its use, form part of the Centre’s 1.5° to Stay Alive Educational Initiative which seeks to embed Climate Change in the regions’ education sector.

According to: Dr. Cain  “When youths are made aware of the connection between personal actions and Global Warming and Climate Change and how those actions relate to the associated impacts of these global phenomenon, they can grasp its ramifications. It is hoped that these workshops will result in heightened awareness amongst educators and youths, as well as changes in their personal habits, practices and values. Our youths must become more actively involved in actions, including leading the charge, towards a climate-resilient future.”

Dr Donneil Cain, Project Development Specialist, CCCCC

It is hoped that after training, educators will be better prepared to convey firm response actions and commitments to reduce vulnerabilities through the implementation of adaptation and mitigation measures.  Participants in these training sessions also learn how to incorporate Climate Change into their existing syllabi. The lessons utilise a cross-curricular approach of accepted philosophies and pedagogical techniques designed to foster interactive engagement in group discussions and practical experiments.

The sessions are being held as follows:

  • August 1 – 2 Belize City
  • August 5 – 6 Punta Gorda
  • August 7 – 8 Dangriga
  • August 12 – 13 Belmopan
  • August 14 – 15 San Ignacio
  • August 19 – 20 Orange Walk

– END –

________________________________________________________________________

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre coordinates the region’s response to climate change. Officially opened in August 2005, the Centre is the key node for information on climate change issues and the region’s response to managing and adapting to climate change. We maintain the Caribbean’s most extensive repository of information and data on climate change specific to the region, which in part enables us to provide climate change-related policy advice and guidelines to CARICOM member states through the CARICOM Secretariat. In this role, the Centre is recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Environment Programme, and other international agencies as the focal point for climate change issues in the Caribbean. The Centre is also a United Nations Institute for Training and Research recognised Centre of Excellence, one of an elite few. Learn more about how we’re working to make the Caribbean more climate resilient by perusing The Implementation Plan.

###

CARICOM Climate Change Experts Meet in Belize

Climate change experts from the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) are meeting in Belize at the Belize Biltmore Plaza between Monday and Tuesday, July 8 and 9, 2019 to review the draft Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate.

The workshop is being organised by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) in association with Climate Analytics and is being implemented through the IMPACT project which is funded by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety.

The objective of the workshop is to prepare CARICOM officials for the IPCC Plenary Meeting in September 2019 which will adopt the Summary for Policy Makers and the underlying report. Chapters in the report addressing sea level rise and the implications for low lying coastal communities and marine ecosystems will be especially important for the Caribbean. The report will provide inputs to the next round of climate change negotiations at COP 25 in Santiago de Chile in December 2019.

The IPCC is the intergovernmental body of the United Nations charged with providing objective scientific information on climate change, its impacts and possible response actions. It produces an authoritative assessment on climate change every seven years in addition to special reports. Its last Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 Degrees Celsius produced last year is now the principal scientific document influencing the international response to climate change.

Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the 5Cs, represented AOSIS as lead negotiator in reaffirming commitment to bold and urgent global climate action based on the best available science in the BBC’s ‘Triple Whammy’ threatens UN Action on Climate Change

protestors

A “triple whammy” of events threatens to hamper efforts to tackle climate change say UN delegates.

At a meeting in Bonn, Saudi Arabia has continued to object to a key IPCC scientific report that urges drastic cuts in carbon emissions.

Added to that, the EU has so far failed to agree to a long term net zero emissions target.

Thirdly, a draft text from the G20 summit in Japan later this week waters down commitments to tackle warming.

One attendee in Bonn said that, taken together, the moves represented a fierce backlash from countries with strong fossil fuel interests.

There was controversy last December at the Katowice COP24 meeting in Poland, when Saudi Arabia, the US, Kuwait and Russia objected to moves to welcome the findings of the IPCC Special Report on 1.5C.

That study, regarded as a landmark, had two clear messages.

It showed that there were huge benefits in keeping temperature rises this century to 1.5C compared to a world that warmed 2C or more.

It also said that keeping the world below 1.5C was still possible, if drastic cuts in emissions were initiated by 2030.

To the frustration of a huge majority of countries, the objections of the four major fossil fuel producers, meant that the scientific report was not formally recognised in the negotiations.

Climate meeting
Image captionDuring intense discussions about the IPCC, some delegates sat on the floor

The battle over the 1.5C report has carried over from Katowice to Bonn. Normally, this mid-year meeting is concerned with technical questions but this time the issue of the IPCC has re-emerged as a huge fault line between nations.

The Saudis are keen to highlight what are termed “knowledge gaps” in the IPCC report, that they believe hamper its ability to inform decision making at national or international level.

“We know that there are some hardliners that would try to downplay the seriousness and the actions that are required, that is their point of view,” said Carlos Fuller from Belize, the lead negotiator for the Alliance of Small Island States.

“They recognise that they need to undertake major changes that they are not happy about.”

Many environmental campaigners see the Saudi pressure on the IPCC as part of campaign to discredit the science.

“The report shows the importance of striving towards 1.5C, that it is still achievable, and there is an incredible urgency to act vigorously and quickly,” said Dr Jeni Miller from the Global Climate and Health Alliance.

“This report was requested by the UN, by these countries themselves, so to not accept the findings of the report is a rejection of science, and if you are rejecting the science there is not a way forward to address this problem.”

climate protestors
Image captionClimate protestors have sought to bring their message to major events including a speech at the Mansion House by Chancellor Philip Hammond

While delegates seek to find a way forward on the science, there is growing concern about the European Union’s inability to reach consensus on cutting carbon emissions to net zero by 2050.

Despite the late support of Germany in favour of the idea, four countries including Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Estonia, refused to support the plan last week.

This has caused some dismay among officials at the UN.

The Secretary General, António Guterres, has called a special summit on climate change to be held in New York in September with the express purpose of getting countries to increase their existing targets.

The EU’s proposed net zero goal was key to making this a success.

Mr Guterres has expressed his “personal concern” about the setback. Campaigners are also worried.

“The EU are very aware of the Secretary General’s summit, they are aware they are calling for a revision of targets, it would be embarrassing for the EU to go with what they just have now,” said Ulriikka Aarnio, from the Climate Action Network.

“Somebody said they would be going from leader to loser if that was the case.”

Contributing to the downbeat mood in Bonn is the forthcoming G20 meeting of global leaders in Osaka, Japan.

A draft of the closing communiqué mentions climate change as just one issue among many and omits to use the phrases “global warming” and “decarbonisation”.

Critics believe that Japan is trying hard to win favour with the US on trade issues by downplaying the scale of the climate question and possible solutions to it.

Japan climate
Image captionJapan is said to be keen to curry favour with the US by downplaying climate issues at the upcoming G20 in Osaka

“The story, based on a draft of the communiqué, shows Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is a weak host and his G20 climate promises are full of hot air, undermining his previous claims that he seeks to save the planet.” said Kimiko Hirata, director of the Kiko Network Japan, a non-governmental organisation.

“Japan, alongside China, is the biggest financier of coal overseas in the world and the government continues to build new coal plants domestically despite our huge solar and wind power potential.”

As well as Japan, other leading economies are continuing to support coal based power generation. A study released by the Overseas Development Institutesays that G20 nations have almost tripled the subsidies given to coal fired plants in recent years, despite the growing need to cut emissions.

CREDIT: BBC News

GCF Visits CCCCC during Strategic Mission to Belize

BELMOPAN: May 20, 2019: A team from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) visited the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) May 6-8 and May 14-15, 2019 while on a mission to Belize to strengthen its engagement with its partners. 

During the visit, the GCF team comprising of Mr Keith Alger, Entity Relations Specialist; Dr Patrick Van Laake, Senior Ecosystems Management Specialist at GCF; and Mrs Neranda Maurice-George, Regional GCF Advisor for the Caribbean; held meetings with CCCCC’s executive director Dr Kenrick Leslie and senior officers from the Centre, to discuss and evaluate the progress and challenges of the Belize Readiness and other projects.

On Monday, May 6, the GCF Team accompanied by Dr Leslie, a team of officers from the Centre and Ambassador Yvonne Hyde, who serves as Belize’s National Designated Authority (NDA), visited the Arundo donax project site and the Belize Sugar Industry in Orange Walk, proposed site for a GCF Simplified Approval Process (SAP) project currently in the pipeline. While at the sugar Factory they witnessed the combustion of Arundo donax (wild cane) fibres at the Belize Cogeneration Energy Company (Belcogen). 

Belcogen plant is experimenting with Arundo donax under a GCF funded project preparation facility to investigate to viability of the wild cane as an alternative source of energy.

The Arundo donax Renewable Energy Project in Belize was the Caribbean’s first project preparation facility (PPF) for which the GCF provided US$694,000 in grant funding to investigate the use of the wild cane as an alternative source of fuel.

During the visit to Orange Walk, the team also met with sugarcane growers’ associations and visited the Belize Sugar Industry (BSI) variety research lab, the Sugar Industry Research and Development Institute (SIRDI) and several farms. They heard ‘first-hand’ the climate change effects impacting sugarcane farmers and their families, as well as, observed ongoing efforts to address the impacts.  

The GCF Team met with officers at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) in Belmopan, Belize on May 7, 2019.

At a meeting at the CCCCC’s Belmopan offices on Tuesday, May 7, Dr Leslie expressed gratitude for the guidance provided by the GCF’s support team during the Centre’s accreditation process in 2015 and during the project development and approval processes. He noted the timeliness of the GCF Mission to Belize and voiced his satisfaction with what he saw at the various sites visited during the field trip, and the importance of the projects to help communities mitigate and adapt to climate change. He thanked the GCF for their continued support for project development, approval and implementation processes.

In addressing the Centre’s executive and senior officers, Dr Alger outlined the plan of engagement, noting that while in Belize, his team would provide an update on the revised GCF rules and processes. He provided information on the Fund’s role and its direction under the new GCF Executive Director, Mr Yannick Glemarec. 

While in Belize the GCF reviewed and provided feedback on the Centre’s pipeline projects and other projects submitted for approval; explored areas for further collaboration and provided guidance on proposed collaborations between the CCCCC and its existing partners, while also setting the framework for and the agreement on a way forward in programming and the Centre’s readiness and re-accreditation.

Since February 2018, the CCCCC has received more than US$38.54 million in GCF grant funding for the implementation of Climate Change and readiness projects in several countries. These include the implementation of the WSRN S-Barbados Project, a project preparation grant for the Arundo donax Renewable Energy Project, and Country Readiness grants for Belize, Bahamas, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines.

On Friday, May 10, 2019, the Centre launched the first single-country investment by the GCF in the Caribbean, Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados (WSRN S-Barbados) project.  

The CCCCC is a GCF direct-access Accredited Entity (AE) based in Belize and is the arm of CARICOM (Caribbean Community) that has the responsibility for leading climate change actions in the Caribbean. As an Accredited Entity, the Centre is positioned to assist government departments and agencies as well as private sector agencies in the Caribbean to access GCF funding for climate adaptation and mitigation project grants of up to US$50 Million per project. The Centre is also prepared to partner with other regional institutions to increase the region’s access to GCF and other donor funding.

The GCF is a global fund created to support the efforts of developing countries to respond to the challenges of climate change through a network of National Designated Authorities and Accredited Entities.

— END —

CCCCC To Launch US$45-M Water Improvement Project In Barbados

banner
The project is made possible through the support of the Centre’s many partners and with funding from the GCF and the GoB

BELMOPAN: May 8, 2019: A five-year multi-million dollar water improvement project that is expected to ease the chronic water woes of more than 190,000 Barbadians will be launched on Friday, May 10, 2019, at the Bowmanston Pumping Station, in St. John, Barbados. 

The Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados (WSRN S-Barbados) is a $45.2-million investment project that is being implemented by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) in collaboration with the Green Climate Fund (GCF), the Government of Barbados and the Barbados Water Authority (BWA). Funding includes US$27.6 million in grants from the GCF and counterpart funding of US$17.6 from the Barbadian government.

The WSRN S-Barbados project is the GCF’s first single-country investment in the Caribbean. When complete, it should improve access to potable water, increase the Barbados water sector’s resilience to extreme climatic events; reduce water disruptions, introduce adaptation and mitigation initiatives through a revolving fund; improve resilience to climate change while building capacity and increasing public-private-partnerships and innovation for climate resilience in the sector. 

“The Centre is proud to be working with the government and people of Barbados on such an important project,” Dr Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director of the CCCCC said, noting:

“The measures to be undertaken under this project is expected to increase adaptation and mitigation measures in households and communities; improve the country’s food security by increasing the farmers’ access to water; reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve the awareness of ordinary Barbadians to the effects of climate variability affecting the country and the wider Caribbean.”

Under the project, photovoltaic (PV) power generation systems are to be installed at the Belle, the Bowmanston and Hampton Pumping Stations to reduce the dependency of the facilities on diesel-generated electricity. Leaks are to be minimised through mains replacement and real-time monitoring. To ensure that any disruptions in the water supply would not immediately result in the loss of potable water to vulnerable sections of the population, water storage tanks and rainwater harvesting systems are to be set up in strategic locations across the island.

Mains replacement and real-time leak monitoring

The Project also includes a Revolving Adaptation Fund Facility (RAFF) to assist households, farmers and small businesses by supporting a number of climate change adaptation and mitigation initiatives in the water sector.

The Fund aims to support the installation of water irrigation and rainwater harvesting systems as well as water saving devices in households, public buildings, hotels and in agriculture operations. The RAFF will continue to build sustainability, advance adaptation and mitigation initiatives in the island’s water sector after the project ends.

General Manager of the BWA Mr. Keithroy Halliday noted: “WSRN S-Barbados project will reduce the BWA’s carbon footprint, create a more reliable water supply and increase capacity building in the Authority. It will have a positive impact by creating resilience to severe weather events, promoting public awareness on climate change effects threatening the water supply system and highlighting ways to mitigate against it as well as improving the sustainability of the water supply system.  These initiatives collectively, are expected to assist the Government of Barbados in meeting its target of carbon neutrality by 2030.”

Project partners include the United States Agency for International Development Climate Change Adaptation Project (USAID-CCAP), the University of the West Indies (UWI), University of South Florida (USF), Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the European Investment Bank (EIB).  

The CCCCC has received more than US$38.54 million in GCF grants for the implementation of Climate Change and readiness projects in several countries. These include the implementation of the WSRN S-Barbados Project, a project preparation grant for the Arundo donax Renewable Energy Project in Belize, and Country Readiness grants for Belize, Bahamas, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines.
 
The CCCCC is a GCF direct-access Accredited Entity based in Belize and is the arm of CARICOM (Caribbean Community) that has responsibility for leading climate change actions in the Caribbean. As an Accredited Entity (AE), the CCCCC is positioned to assist government departments and agencies as well as private sector agencies in the Caribbean to access GCF funding for climate adaptation and mitigation project grants of up to US$50 Million per project. The Centre is also prepared to partner with other regional institutions to increase the region’s access to GCF and other donor funding.

The GCF is a global fund created to support the efforts of developing countries to respond to the challenges of climate change through a network of National Designated Authorities (NDAs) and Accredited Entities.

Cuban Ambassador to Belize meets with the CCCCC and GoB on Coastal Erosion

Meeting attendees from left to right: Dr. Lennox Gladden, Chief Climate Change Officer of the National Climate Change Office in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment and Sustainable Development; Mr. Miguel Izquierdo, Cuban Coastal Erosion Expert; the Cuban Ambassador to Belize, Her Excellency Mrs. Lissette Pérez; Dr. Jose Juanes, Cuban Coastal Erosion Expert; Dr. Percival Cho, Chief Executive Officer of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Sustainable Development, the Environment, Climate Change and Solid Waste Management Authority and Mr. Ahnivar Peralta, Research Assistant, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre

March 20, 2019; Belmopan, Belize. – The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) hosted a meeting on March 18, at its office in Belmopan, Belize; with the Cuban Ambassador to Belize, Her Excellency Mrs. Lissette Pérez; and representatives from the Government of Belize’s Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Sustainable Development, the Environment, Climate Change and Solid Waste Management Authority, to discuss the Coastal Erosion Assessment conducted by two Cuban Coastal Erosion Specialists.

“We want to formalize and solidify the relationship between Belize and Cuba. Belize acknowledges that Cuba has the know-how and technical capacity to best guide and advise Belize on these issues as we aim to build our national capacity for the sustainability of these initiatives”


Dr. Lennox Gladden, Chief Climate Change Officer of the National Climate Change Office.

On March 13 and 14, 2019, the specialists, Dr. José Luis Juanes and MSc. Miguel Izquierdo from Cuba’s Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (CITMA) also visited the coastal town of Dangriga and Hopkins, a community within its environs to identify the various natural and human factors affecting coastal erosion there.

Hopkins Coastal Area

Beach scarp, dead trees, exposed roots, waves reaching building foundations and some inefficiency coastal protection structures, demonstrate the extent of erosion in Dangriga-Hopkins. Locals estimate that the shoreline has receded by 20 to 25 feet in the last 5 years.

Dangriga Coastal Area
Dangriga Coastal Area

In an effort to stabilize the coastline, the experts discussed possible measures and solutions. Dr. Juanes and Mr. Izquierdo recommended three areas of focus, namely: research, legal direction to define and regulate the coastal zone and the deployment of adequate engineering.

Dr. Percival Cho, Chief Executive Officer noteded: “It is important to structure Belize’s regulatory framework to better govern the development of our beaches.”Her Excellency Mrs. Pérez expressed interest in the actions, best practices and sustainable adaptation initiatives that Belize could undertake to mitigate the damages.

The meeting concluded on the promise of further collaboration between Cuba and Belize to address the issues of coastal erosion and vulnerability as well as other related areas.

Caribbean at Annual Meeting of the AMS

Dr Leonard Nurse, Chairman of the Board and Mr Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) attended the 99th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in their personal capacities. Other participants from the Caribbean at the meeting held in Phoenix, Arizona, USA from 6 to 10 January 2019 included Dr David Farrell, Principal of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), Mr Glendell de Souza, Deputy Coordinating Director of the Caribbean Meteorological Organization (CMO) and representatives of the national Meteorological Services of the Antigua and Barbuda, Guyana and Suriname.

There were several presentations by scientists from the CIMH. Shawn Boyce presented on “Impact-Based Forecasting and Assessment in the Caribbean”.  Lawrence Pologne delivered a presentation on “The Potential, Viability and Co-benefits of Developing Wind Energy to Mitigate Climate Change in the Caribbean” based on his University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill doctoral thesis. Branden Spooner, an Intern at CIMH, presented on “Using Virtual Reality Technology as a Tool in Disaster Risk Reduction”.

There were several presentations of interest to the region. Kristie Ebi delivered on “Building Resilience of Health Systems in Pacific Island Least Developed Countries”. She also worked with Cory Morin of the University of Washington who delivered a presentation on, “Use of Seasonal Climate Forecasts to Develop an Early-Warning System for Dengue Fever Risk in Central America and the Caribbean”. They expressed an interest with collaborating with the CCCCC in developing this warning system.

The CIMH, and the national Meteorological Services of Belize and Jamaica were used in Catherine Vaughan’s, “Evaluation of Regional Climate Services: Learning from Seasonal Scale Examples across the Americas”. She is working out of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Colombia University.

Belize may find the presentation by Jorge Tamayo of the State Meteorological Agency, Spain, on “New Projects on Iberoamerican Meteorological Cooperation” of special interest. One project is on the development of a lightening detection network for Central America. They are also collaborating with the Regional Committee of Hydrological Services (CRRH) and the Central American Integration System (SICA) on a meeting in 2019 on the delivery of climate services.

In an interesting session on Communicating Climate Change, Mike Nelson of KMGH-TV in Denver Colorado, presented on “Communicating Climate Change – Be the Expert in the Living Room”, and Hank Jenkins-Smith of the University of Oklahoma delivered a presentation on “Stability and Instability in Individual Beliefs about Climate Change”. Jenkins-Smith noted that based on polling trends, conservatives were more likely to change their beliefs on climate change while liberals were more likely to retain their opinions on climate change.

In a session on Climate Extremes in the Tropical Americas: Past, Present and Future, Derek Thompson of Louisiana State University (LSU) presented on “Spatiotemporal Patterns and Recurrence Intervals of Tropical Cyclone Strikes for the Caribbean Islands from 1901 to 2017”, and Prashant Sardeshmukh, CIRES presented on “Can We Trust Model Projections of Changes in Climate Extremes over the Tropical Americas?”. He noted that dynamics played a more important role than atmospheric temperature in explaining extreme weather events. Current climate models were not capturing this aspect accurately and more work was required in this area. Kristine DeLong of LSU presented her work on “Last Interglacial Sea Surface Temperature Variability in the Tropical Atlantic Warm Pool: A Comparison of Model and Coral-Based Reconstructions”, which focused mainly on paleoclimatic reconstructions based on coral samples in the Caribbean. She noted the importance of collaboration with Caribbean institutions.

The 100th AMS Meeting will be held in Boson, Massachusetts from 12 to 16 January 2020. Caribbean meteorologists, hydrologists and climate change experts are encouraged to attend these meetings to be appraised of the most recent research on these subjects.

Belize accepts the chairmanship of AOSIS

In the Photo: H.E. Ambassador Lois Young, Permanent Representative of Belize to the UN in New York; H.E. Mr. Hussain Rasheed Hassan Minister of Environment Ministry of Environment; Mr. Amjad Abdulla Director-General / Chief Negotiator for AOSIS Climate Change Department Ministry of Environment and Energy

The following statement by Belize was delivered at a Ministerial Meeting of AOSIS during a short ceremony on the occasion of the 24th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to mark Belize’s acceptance of the chairmanship of AOSIS from the Maldives in January 2019. Belize will hold the chairmanship for two years to be followed by Antigua and Barbuda in 2021.

“Good evening distinguishing delegates, colleagues.   I am delivering this statement on behalf of the Vice Minister of Belize who had to leave early because of another pressing engagement.

On this occasion I wish to extend sincere thanks to the Maldives for steering our group over the course of their Chairmanship, for their leadership and support.  I extend congratulations from my Ministry and from the Government of Belize.

Colleagues of AOSIS, Belize accepts the first half of the incoming Chairmanship of AOSIS with a profound recognition of the challenges ahead.  Acknowledging and building on the work put in by the Maldives over the past four years and that of the Republic of Nauru before that, and supported by all member nations, and relying on the sound expertise and innovative ideas of our collective body of experts. Belize intends to advance the work of AOSIS over the next two years, with a renewed focus on structure and support for member parties.  Advancing the work to achieve the sustainable development goals will be a major focus over the next two years.  Also of paramount importance is the unity of AOSIS which must be preserved.

Ahead of us lies a great challenge, predicated by the distraction of parties backing out of the Paris Agreement and others unwilling to accept the latest science of a world at 1.5 degrees.  The best science of the latest IPCC report is sound and yes it is alarming, but all parties must respect and accept it, and seek common ground to come to terms with the implications of it.

As those among the most vulnerable and those already suffering the impacts, Belize and the Caribbean region stands ready to push ahead the work of AOSIS.  We look forward to your continued support.

Thank you.”

Request for Expression of Interest for Consultancy Services: Technical Indigenous Coordinator for the REDD+ Readiness Project, PACT Belize

The Government of Belize with the assistance of the World Bank is implementing the project entitled “Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) Readiness Project in Belize” with Grant funding from the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility “FCPF” and has appointed the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment, Sustainable Development and Immigration (MAFFESDI) for the overall implementation of the Project with the fiduciary support provided by the Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT).  The Government of Belize intends to apply part of the proceeds of the grant to payments under the contract for this Consultancy.

REDD+ and PACT now invites eligible consultants to indicate their interest in providing the services. In submitting Expression of Interest, consultants should provide information demonstrating that he/she has the required and relevant experience to perform the services.

Interested consultants can request the Terms of Reference by email at redd.procurement.officer@pactbelize.org.

Expressions of Interest must be delivered in a written form to the address below (in person, mail, fax or e-mail) by 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday 20th November 2018 to:

REDD+ Procurement Officer
Protected Areas Conservation Trust
3 Mango Street
Belmopan, Cayo District
Tel: 822-3637
redd.procurement.officer@pactbelize.org

The sealed envelope containing the Expression of Interest must include the name and address of the applicant and should be clearly marked:

TECHNICAL INDIGENOUS COORDINATOR FOR THE REDD+ READINESS PROJECT IN BELIZE

Peruse full advert below:

Request for Expression of Interest for Consultancy Services

%d bloggers like this: