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Resource mobilization for adapting to impacts of climate change

Planning for actions and resources by communities. Credit: SGP St. Lucia

Planning for actions and resources by communities. Credit: SGP St. Lucia

 

After years of working with grassroots organizations in Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States, I can confidently say that communities around the developing world are acutely aware of the toll climate change is taking. But it is also the case that these communities possess the knowledge and will to adapt to those impacts.

These communities have deep stores of intergenerational wisdom and knowledge about proven adaptation practices—practices that have been tested through decades through trial and error, and are an invaluable means for these communities to cope with climate hazards and uncertainties.

But if the knowledge and will are there, the resources are not—indeed, “we don’t have the resources” is far and away the single biggest obstacle these communities say is preventing them from implementing projects. This is troubling for practitioners like myself, since it means that we often have to hunt for financial resources before we can even begin the process of engaging with communities to see what actions can be taken.

Thus, the availability of financial and labor resources is crucial for adaptation projects to thrive. And while the common practice is to try to secure financial resources from external resources, it’s necessary that local resources be sought first so that communities are incentivized to take ownership over adaptation measures, as well as to ensure that these measures are fully in sync with communities’ priorities and development objectives.

But intangible resources also need to be built up—maybe the most important of these is a common approach to adaptation, one that builds off of communities’ sense of cohesion and shared purpose. Standalone initiatives that are not interlinked with wider initiatives will not be sustainable. Hence, it is crucial during the planning phase to think about how a project can draw upon and further strengthen existing community bonds and impacts of other actions.

For example, while planning projects with the Omusati, Ohangwena, Oshana and Oshikoto communities in northern Namibia in 2012, the biggest asset these communities brought on the table was a well-organized approach that was glued together by a strong sense of purpose—they were all deeply committed to tackling the floods and food insecurity that were resulting from increasingly unpredictable seasonal changes.

Political goodwill must be engendered in local and central government authorities, which will help to build an enabling environment for coordinated and timely adaptation efforts. Yet communities often perceive state and local institutions as counterproductive to their adaptation efforts. This distrust has to be overcome by being accountable and transparent about resources allocated for community level adaptation projects within national budgets and programmes. It is integral for community adaptation projects to have a clear connection with national laws, regulations, unwritten bylaws and accepted norms, all of which can be invaluable in rallying communities to effectively adapt.

The COP21 conference and climate change agreement is an incredible opportunity to globally tackle the threat of climate change, to reduce carbon emissions and to prevent this challenge from severely damaging the lives and livelihoods of billions. However, the Paris agreement must also be an opportunity to support those who are already feeling the impact of climate change, and to facilitate access to resources that enable adaptation. This is especially important given the fact that funding and investments from the private sector tend to favor mitigation projects and middle income countries. We must make sure that Paris goes the last mile and supports all people, especially the most vulnerable.

Credit: UNDP

The Caribbean Needs a 1.5 C binding outcome at COP21

 

The Caribbean region is enduring the brunt of the ravaging effects of climate change. Sea level rise, frequent and intense natural hazards; extended dry seasons, loss of livelihood and the very disappearance of some of our islands are among the clear and present dangers that we face. The economic costs of climate change are beyond the capacity of these countries to bear without the provision of considerably more concessionary resources to address the impacts. This is why it is so important that our global partners support the call to limit warming to below 1.5C. This is achievable. This is urgent. Our very survival depends on it.

This video was produced by the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB). The CDB is a regional financial institution which was established by an Agreement signed on October 18, 1969, in Kingston, Jamaica, and entered into force on January 26, 1970. The Bank came into existence for the purpose of contributing to the harmonious economic growth and development of the member countries in the Caribbean and promoting economic cooperation and integration among them, having special and urgent regard to the needs of the less developed members of the region.

The UK to launch Caribbean infrastructure partnership

Source: livemint

Source: livemint

 The English speaking Caribbean is set to benefit from 300 million pounds in grant funding to support infrastructure development.

British Prime Minister David Cameron made the announcement in a joint sitting of Jamaica’s parliament on September 30, 2015.

“I’m launching a new UK, Caribbean infrastructure partnership to build real tangible things that will make a difference for people across the Caribbean. Roads, bridges, ports, critical economic infrastructure that will set the foundations for growth and prosperity and in turn reduce poverty while helping the region to become more resilient to the risks of Climate Change. Just think about what this could deliver, hundreds of kilometer of roads to link up vital markets. Bridges to unite remote communities. New energy projects to power growth and vital defenses to protect coastal communities. Let me be clear £300 million is not soft loads, not tide aid. It is cash grants.”

Cameron says Caribbean leaders will decide how to spend the funds. He also announced an additional 60 million pounds in financing.

“Today I can also announce 30 million pounds for new programs to help attract investments and improve governance and 30 million pounds to help make your hospital more resilient to natural disasters. We need to make sure that if a hurricane strikes, crucial health centers can remain operational to treat the wounded and together this represents a quadrupling of Britain support. It will make us the largest donor to the region. It will create jobs and save lives and you can take it literally as a concrete statement of my commitment to the Caribbean.”

The British Prime Minister adds he hopes the Caribbean will make use of US 9 billion in climate adaptation financing that the UK will provide over the next five years.

“We hope this money can help unlock the global climate deal and giving the vulnerability of small island state that face the risk of devastation from climate change, a fair proportion should be sent, I hope will be spent right here supporting some of the UK’s oldest friends to prepare and provide for the future. When I met Caribbean leaders just a few days ago at the United Nations General Assembly. They made it clear to me directly, just how vital the climate deal is to them. So I pledge to work in partnership with them and other like minded states to secure a bold and ambitious deal in Paris later this year.”

Cameron also revealed that the UK will spend £25 million on building a prison in Jamaica so that foreign criminals in the UK can be sent home to serve sentences in the Caribbean.

More than 600 Jamaican nationals are in UK jails but cannot be deported because of Jamaica’s poor prison conditions.

Officials say the foreign aid-funded deal could save taxpayers £10m a year when transfers begin in 2020.

Credit: The Daily Observer

State Minister Commends CCIC for Support of Entrepreneurs

Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson (right) and Counsellor and Head, Development Cooperation, at the Canadian High Commission, Walter Bernyck (second left), with grant recipients and innovators (from left): Robert Wright, Shirley Lindo, Harlo Mayne and Dr. Kert Edward, at a cocktail reception to highlight the work of the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC), held at the Scientific Research Council (SRC), in St. Andrew, on September 16.

Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson (right) and Counsellor and Head, Development Cooperation, at the Canadian High Commission, Walter Bernyck (second left), with grant recipients and innovators (from left): Robert Wright, Shirley Lindo, Harlo Mayne and Dr. Kert Edward, at a cocktail reception to highlight the work of the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC), held at the Scientific Research Council (SRC), in St. Andrew, on September 16.

Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson, has lauded the Caribbean Climate Innovation Centre (CCIC) for its support of Caribbean entrepreneurs.

“This is a programme that encourages entrepreneurs to come up with solutions. You provide funding,  so that they can build a solution which won’t necessarily just solve a problem in Jamaica, or the Caribbean, but which can solve problems globally,” Mr. Robinson said.

The State Minister was speaking at a cocktail reception to highlight the work of the  CCIC, held at the Scientific Research Council (SRC), in St. Andrew, on September 16.

The CCIC is a joint project of the Caribbean Industrial Research Institute, World Bank and the SRC. It was designed to identify and support Caribbean entrepreneurs and new ventures that are developing locally appropriate solutions to climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Phase One of the project was highly successful, as 11 entrepreneurs were selected as proof of concept winners and awarded grants ranging from US$10,000 to US$50,000, totalling approximately US$425,000. The winners were from Jamaica, Antigua, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Kitts and Nevis, Dominica, St. Lucia and Belize.

The four Jamaican winners are Shirley Lindo, Castor Oil Briquettes; Dr. Kert Edward, Fibre Optic Solar Indoor Lighting; Robert Wright,  Pedro Banks Renewable Energy; and Harlo Mayne, for his H2-Flex Hydrogen Hybrid Project.

Meanwhile, the State Minister noted that one of the challenges facing entrepreneurs is the inability to access non-banking financing, such as venture funding.

“There are some developments that are taking place in a positive way in that regard. The Development Bank of Jamaica has an initiative on venture capital, and there are a couple of private angel investor groups that have been established, all of which are positive for the development of innovation and entrepreneurship,” Mr. Robinson said.

He pointed out that the innovations that are a part of the CCIC, fit right into the plans that the Government has in terms of building a sustainable energy policy.

For his part, Executive Director of the SRC, Dr. Cliff Riley, said the CCIC is looking forward to moving on to Phase Two of the project.

“We are looking to see how we can drive entrepreneurship and create a spirit of innovation in Jamaica and in the Caribbean region,” Dr. Riley said.

Phase Two of the project will provide: proof of concept grant funding for new cohorts of entrepreneurs; training (including access to financing, market development and business incubation training); mentoring and networking opportunities; and specific business incubation services.

The project, which is housed at the SRC, caters to the Caribbean Community, including Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago.

Credit: Jamaica Information Service

St.Lucia Hosts Two Critical Climate Change Conferences

The Ministry of Sustainable Development, Energy, Science and Technology in St Lucia, the OECS Commission and the High Level Support Mechanism are hosting two important meetings on Climate Change this week at the Bay Gardens Hotel in Rodney Bay. The first meeting, which concluded yesterday, brought together senior climate change negotiators from across the Caribbean over two days to discuss the major issues ahead of global negotiations that will should lead to the signing of a new international climate change agreement. The new agreement is expected to be signed at the 21st Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris at the end of the year.

St Lucia is also host to a second meeting from January 28 to 29. The meeting will bring together Caribbean ministers with responsibility for climate change to address four main objectives:

  1. provide ministers with a status report on the climate change negotiations;
  2.  provide political guidance to CARICOM negotiators participating in the negotiations;
  3. prepare ministers for engaging in climate change negotiations during 2015; and
  4. identify and discuss priority political actions that are required at the national level to accelerate the national and regional responses to climate change.

These two meetings are critical in helping to formulate a coordinated regional approach to the myriad issues on climate change—particularly in the areas of adaptation, mitigation, loss and damage, and climate financing.

Credit: Caribbean Hot FM

Finance for Climate Action Flowing Globally – Upwards of 650B in 2011-2012

Header Image

Credit: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

 Finance for Climate Action Flowing Globally stood at $650 Billion annually in 2011-2012, and possibly higher
Annual public and private flows from developed to developing countries
 ranged from $40 to $175 billion
Dedicated multilateral climate funds - including UNFCCC funds – represented small shares during the same period, but are set to rise with the recent pledges to the Green Climate Fund
 amounting to nearly $10 billion
There is relative uncertainty in the global figures in part due to data gaps and other limitations, but efforts to improve the quality of measurement and reporting of climate finance flows are under way

Hundreds of billions of dollars of climate finance may now be flowing across the globe annually according to a landmark assessment presented yesterday to governments meeting in Lima, Peru at the UN Climate Convention meeting.

The assessment – which includes a summary and recommendations by the UNFCCC Standing Committee on Finance and a technical report by experts – is the first of assessment reports that puts together information and data on financial flows supporting emission reductions and adaptation within countries and via international support.

The assessment puts the lower range of global total climate finance flows at $340 billion a year for the period 2011-2012, with the upper end at $650 billion, and possibly higher.

  • Support from developed countries to developing countries amounted to between $35 and $50 billion annually, with multilateral development banks (MDBs), climate-related Official development Assistance (ODA) and other official flows (OOF) representing significant shares of resources channelled through public institutions.
  • Funding through dedicated multilateral climate funds – including UNFCCC funds ($ 0,6 billion) – represented smaller shares during the same period, and do not include the recent pledges for the Green Climate Fund amounting to nearly $10 billion.

The assessment notes that the exact amounts of global totals could be higher due to the complexity of defining climate finance, the myriad of ways in which governments and organizations channel funding, and data gaps and limitations – particularly for adaptation and energy efficiency.

In addition, the assessment attributes different levels of confidence to different sub-flows, with data on global total climate flows being relatively uncertain, in part due to the fact that most data reflect finance commitments rather than disbursements, and the associated definitional issues.

The assessment is an important contribution of the Standing Committee on Finance that enhances transparency and clarity on climate finance flows – including information on international support to developing countries.

In addition, the assessment includes a set of recommendations by the Standing Committee on Finance to the Conference of the Parties, which, among other things, include ways to strengthen transparency and accuracy of information on climate finance flows through working towards a definition of climate finance and further efforts that would enable better measurement, reporting and verification.

The assessment also recognizes the need for understanding the impacts of climate finance associated with emissions reductions and activities to boost resilience to climate change.

The 2014 Biennial Assessment and Overview of Climate Finance Flows has been prepared by the Standing Committee on Finance following a mandate by the Conference of the Parties. The 2014 report was prepared with input from a wide range of experts and contributing organizations that collect data on climate finance flows.

Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC, said: “Finance will be a crucial key for achieving the internationally-agreed goal of keeping a global temperature rise under 2 degrees C and sparing people and the planet from dangerous climate change”.

“Understanding how much is flowing from public and private sources, how much is leveraging further investments and how much is getting to vulnerable countries and communities including for adaptation is not easy, but vital for ensuring we are adequately financing a global transformation,” she said.

“I would like to thank the Standing Committee on Finance and the numerous experts and organizations who have contributed to this important assessment. It provides a baseline and a foundation upon which future assessments and more importantly future climate action can be refined and focused,” said Ms. Figueres.

“This first biennial assessment represents a milestone of the work of the Standing Committee on Finance. It is an important information tool for Parties to the Convention that provides a picture of climate finance flows and how they relate to climate actions, including the objectives of the Convention” said Standing Committee on Finance co-chairs Diann Black Layne and Stefan Schwager.

“Going forward, the Standing Committee on Finance will contribute further to improvements in the information on climate finance flows, including through collaborations with data collectors and aggregators,” they added.

More Facts and Figures from the 2014 Biennial Assessment and Overview of Climate Finance Flows Report:

  • Global total flows: Most climate finance in 2011/2012 is raised and spent at home–in developed countries 80 per cent of the funds deployed for climate action are raised domestically.
  • The same pattern is seen in developing countries where just over 71 per cent comes from national sources
  • Around 95 per cent of global total climate finance is spent on mitigation or cutting emissions with 5 per cent on adaptation.
  • Subsidies for oil and gas and investments in fossil fuel-fired generation are almost double the global finance for addressing climate change
  • Flows from developed to developing countries: Multiple sources were involved in providing funding to support climate action in developing countries ranging from Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) and Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) to multilateral climate funds – including funds administered by the Operating Entities of the Financial Mechanism of the Convention and the Kyoto Protocol.
  • For example, finance from MDBs is around between $15 and $23 billion annually; multilateral climate funds including via the GEF were about $1.5 billion, including those linked to the UNFCCC at about $0.6 billion a year.
  • 48 to 78 per cent of finance is reported as fast-start finance (2010-2012), in Biennial Reports (2011-2012), through multilateral climate funds, and through MDBs supports mitigation, or other/multiple objectives (6 to 41 per cent)
  • Adaptation finance in the same sources ranges from 11 per cent to 24 per cent.

Notes to Editors

The assessment has tried to identify the flows to various sectors and initiatives–real precision in this area will have to await future assessments and the numbers need to be treated with caution.

Adaptation Investments Unclear

Assessing investments in adaptation is particularly difficult often because they can form part of a larger project such as an investment in a port of water supply system.

Meanwhile, there is also no universal operational definition of what constitutes adaptation and in addition publicly funded adaptation actions within countries–both developed and developing–is rarely reported or available.

As a result, flows from developed to developing countries are not really known with precision.

The biennial assessment and overview of climate finance flows can be found on the UNFCCC website.

About the UNFCCC

With 196 Parties, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has near universal membership and is the parent treaty of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. The Kyoto Protocol has been ratified by 192 of the UNFCCC Parties. For the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, 37 States, consisting of highly industrialized countries and countries undergoing the process of transition to a market economy, have legally binding emission limitation and reduction commitments. In Doha in 2012, the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol adopted an amendment to the Kyoto Protocol, which establishes the second commitment period under the Protocol. The ultimate objective of both treaties is to stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that will prevent dangerous human interference with the climate system.

Credit: UNFCCC Press page

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UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres on Twitter: @CFigueres
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Understanding the Energy-Water Nexus

Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) recently released the publication ‘Understanding the Energy-Water Nexus’ that can be downloaded at http://www.ecn.nl/docs/library/report/2014/e14046.pdf.

Nexus

Why is it important?

Climate change is a global problem, and one of the main challenges facing mankind this century. Climate change is driven mainly by energy use and land use changes, but at the same time climate change mitigation and adaptation measures place increased pressure on water and land resources. The use of conventional energy technologies contributes negatively to climate change, and some technologies require large amounts of water. However, water and land are often crucial resource inputs for implementing climate mitigation and adaptation measures.

Climate change and energy, water and food resource systems are fundamentally interrelated. We need energy to produce food and to treat and move water; we need water to cultivate food crops and to generate essentially any form of energy; and we need food to support the world’s growing population that both generates and relies on energy and water services. Land availability also constitutes an important element in each of these three resources, for example for crop production for either food or energy purposes. This mutual relationship is defined as the “Energy-Water-Food Nexus”.

To date, the three individual resource systems of energy, water, and food have mostly been organised and studied independently. In a rapidly developing world with ever more pressing environmental challenges, however, choices and actions in each of these three domains can significantly affect the others, positively or negatively. Therefore it is important to take a “nexus approach” to analysing these three resource systems. Conventional policy- and decision-making with regards to each of these domains in isolation is not necessarily anymore the most effective or optimal course of planning or action. A “nexus approach”, which in our context refers to a multidisciplinary type of analysis of the relationship between energy, water and food, can help to balance trade-offs and to build synergies across these different sectors. In an increasingly complex and interrelated world this approach can lead to better and more efficient resource use as well as cross-sectoral policy coherence.

This report begins by reviewing the current thinking reported in the existing literature on the “Energy-Water-Food Nexus”. Given that the nexus constitutes a broad, recently emerging, and still largely undefined and poorly understood concept and associated field of research, we then narrow down our focus to predominantly inspect the interrelationship between energy and water. This report aims to inform local and regional decision-makers responsible for the development and implementation of policies related to energy and water resource systems.

Credit: ECN

Global Islands’ Vulnerability Research, Adaptation, Policy and Development (GIVRAPD) Project

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Farming has long been a mainstay of St Lucia’s economy but for one grower living in the hills of Soufrière there’s no telling how long it can be a source of income. Climate change is altering the environmental balance, tipping life on the land into even greater uncertainty.

“You don’t know when to plant and when to not plant. When you’re waiting for rain, you’re not getting rain. When you’re waiting for sun, you’re not getting sun,” the farmer says.

Townspeople are also still struggling with the fallout from environmental disasters years after severe storms have made their deadly sweeps through the region.

“For me, around here it’s not safe anymore. When it’s raining I leave. For me, it hasn’t stopped,” a survivor of 2010’s Hurricane Tomas says.

But the residents of Soufrière are not alone. Half a world away, islanders in communities across the Indian Ocean are facing similar environmental upheavals and working out ways to cope with them. Each community has much to learn from the others and GIVRAPD – the Global Islands’ Vulnerability Research Adaptation Policy Development research project – makes that sharing possible. GIVRAPD is a unique project that overcomes great physical distances to tie together the experience of four small island communities – two in the Caribbean (St Lucia and Jamaica) and two in the Indian Ocean (Mauritius and Seychelles).

It’s just one more way that INTASAVE is helping developing countries access resources and knowledge elsewhere in the global South.

Over two years, researchers will catalogue the vast range of socioeconomic, governance and environmental conditions that make island towns and villages particularly vulnerable to climate change. Through dozens of interviews with residents, the team will define the risks ahead and what stands in the way of adaptation. Whether its agriculture, fishing or tourism, researchers will look for the specific factors that determine whether those economies have a future.

The team will also chart the likely changes in the environment and, together with a cross-section of community representatives, map ways residents can continue to earn a living in the long term. The broader goal is to give townspeople the information they need to make their own decisions.

In addition, the team will investigate the viability of weather-related micro-insurance as a safeguard for low-income residents against disastrous losses.

The project, funded by the Climate Development Knowledge Network, is being led by INTASAVE in partnership with the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment at Oxford University. Contributions will also come from four other universities, including the University of Mauritius and the African Climate and Development Initiative based at the University of Cape Town.

For more information contact: admin@intasave.org and see the website: www.givrapd.org

PROJECT SUMMARY

Optimism in The Virgin Islands about $50M per anum in funding to tackle Climate Change

Talking Climate Change (From L-R). Hon. Dr. Kedrick Pickering, Deputy Premier and Minister for Natural Resources and Labour; Mr. George de Berdt Romily, Climate Change Law and Policy Specialist at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre; and Dr. Ulric Trotz, Deputy Director and Science Adviser Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. Photo Credit: Gordon French/BVI Platinum News

Talking Climate Change (From L-R). Hon. Dr. Kedrick Pickering, Deputy Premier and Minister for Natural Resources and Labour; Mr. George de Berdt Romily, Climate Change Law and Policy Specialist at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre; and Dr. Ulric Trotz, Deputy Director and Science Adviser Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre.
Photo Credit: Gordon French/BVI Platinum News

The Virgin Islands is said to be well ahead of most small-island developing states on the issue of climate change adaptation and in the coming months could have in place the framework to access millions to mitigate against the effects of those changes.

Some $50 million will be needed annually to cushion the effects of climate change which experts said has already started to manifest through sea level rise, unpredictable weather patterns and more intense hurricanes.

Deputy Premier and Minister of Natural Resources and Labour, Hon. Dr. Kedrick Pickering is leading the charge to ensure that residents are sensitized on the issue of climate change.

During the launch of the public awareness campaign yesterday, May 6, Dr. Pickering indicated that the Territory is currently setting up the climate change trust fund as the vehicle to access a portion of the billions the developed countries have set aside to help at-risk states.

However, the proposed legislative framework to establish the fund has to first get approval from Cabinet before it’s taken to the House of assembly for debate and subsequent passage.

Consultant, Mr. George de Berdt Romily, Climate Change Law and Policy Specialist at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre noted that delaying the implementation of climate change adaptation plans will be more costly.

“We recognize that it is totally unrealistic to expect that the Virgin Islands can raise this additional $50 million from existing resources. There is a need to try and find how best we can raise these resources,” Mr. Romily stated.

He further explained, “There is also a commitment from the international community to finance the incremental cost associated with climate change. We do anticipate that once the trust fund is up and running, there will be contributions from international community to pay for the incremental costs. We hope to come close to the $50 million that is needed.”

He said the ability of the Virgin Islands to have continued access to international funds will depend on the Territory’s ability to operate the trust fund in a transparent manner and ensure the viability of the projects on the ground.

In May 2012, Cabinet approved the Virgin Islands Climate Change Adaptation Policy, but the funding is necessary to implement a number of the urgent priority climate change and disaster management programs.

Dr. Ulric Trotz, Deputy Director and Science Adviser, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre has also been assisting the Territory in implement mitigation plans.

5Cs Unveils Comprehensive 1.5˚C Stay Alive Climate Change Curriculum

1.5 to Stay Alive

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre‘s 1.5 Stay Alive curriculum and associated resources is now available.

Download your copy of the 1.5 Stay Alive Education Initiative.

Cognizant of the threat Climate Change poses to the region’s survival and continued development, the Centre launched the 1.5 ˚C Stay Alive campaign ahead of COP15 in December 2009. The two tiered campaign sought to sensitize citizens across the Caribbean Community about the impact of Climate Change on livelihoods in the region, and make a convincing case at the global level for the reduction of GHG emissions to a level not exceeding 350 ppm (parts per million) as an effective means of stabilising global warming.

Intended Audience

The Centre has since broadened its effort through the crafting of curricular resources designed for Caribbean children ages 12 to 16. These resources, crafted by educators in collaboration with the Centre’s technical team, forms part of the Centre’s thrust to embed Climate Change in the region’s education sector beginning in Belize. The four unit curriculum (The Warming Climate, Sea Level Rise, Pine Forest and Social Impacts of Global Warming), includes classroom face to face interaction, field trips, workbooks and varied assessments, has a total of 46 wide-ranging lessons with supporting resources and several videos.

The 1.5 Stay Alive Curriculum Units

The teaching and learning activities can be modified to suit local situations and the ages of the students. A variety of extended activities have been included, which should be viewed as suggestions and so other activities can be substituted. The intent is an attempt to teach complex concepts with uncommon terminologies to young people. If they are to appreciate what is being taught, the terminologies must be clear to them. It is imperative that today’s youths are made aware of what the impacts of Climate Change and Global Warming could be, and so that knowledge would assist in making them appreciate the ramifications.

The students need to know who will be vulnerable and in what ways. Armed with the necessary information, it is hoped that awareness will be developed and spur changes in habits, practices, and values. Such would contribute to understanding mitigation and adaptation measures suggested.

The resource comprises teaching and learning activities and a range of supporting materials including worksheets, photographs, posters, suggestions for power point presentations, videos and field trips. Most importantly there is much resource information for the teachers who need to understand the concepts they are expected to teach. The prepared, well informed, confident teacher will always succeed in teaching effectively and as a result, students will learn.

In the references listed, there are numerous websites and books. Comprehensive glossaries are included. Word search and crossword puzzle are suggested assignments which should assist the students in comprehending the vocabulary used throughout. There are also a few appropriate poems and songs which can be used to encourage self-expression and facilitate student involvement.

The cross-curricular approach used in most lesson plans is in accordance with accepted philosophies and principles of education. While students learn in groups, they will be encouraged to investigate, observe, question, predict, test, collect, record, analyze data, draw conclusions, and think critically.

Download your copy of the 1.5 Stay Alive Education Initiative.
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