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CCCCC Implements Work From Home Policy

Cop26 climate talks postponed to 2021 amid coronavirus pandemic

The Scottish Event Campus in Glasgow where Cop26 is due to take place. (Pic: Flickr/Stevie Brown)

Postponement will help clarify US climate policy – Trump is pulling out of the Paris Agreement but Biden or Sanders would rejoin if elected in November

The UN has postponed a critical summit meant to jumpstart global climate action until 2021 as the world reels from the coronavirus pandemic.

The UN talks, known as Cop26, had been due to take place in Glasgow from 9-20 November with the goal of spurring deep cuts in greenhouse gases in the coming decade to rein in rising temperatures.

Up to 30,000 delegates were expected from around the world in the biggest diplomatic event the UK has ever hosted.

“The world is currently facing an unprecedented global challenge and countries are rightly focusing their efforts on saving lives and fighting Covid-19,” Alok Sharma, UK president-designate of Cop26, said in a statement. “That is why we have decided to reschedule Cop26.”

“Covid-19 is the most urgent threat facing humanity today, but we cannot forget that climate change is the biggest threat facing humanity over the long term,” said Patricia Espinosa, head of UN Climate Change.

A UN statement seen by Climate Home News said the summit would be postponed into next year, but did not set a new date. A preparatory session of talks due at UN Climate Change’s headquarters in Bonn, Germany, in June were also put off until preliminary dates of 4-13 October, with a review in August.

The session of mid-year talks is due to lay some of the ground work ahead of the Cop, giving negotiators time to advance on technical issues. A number of topics including the reporting of countries’ climate plans and efforts to create a new global carbon market were left unresolved at the last round of talks.

The decision to postpone the talks was taken by the UN Climate Change bureau – which is comprised of top climate diplomats from various countries, including Cop25 president and Chilean environment minister Carolina Schmidt and UN Climate Change head Patricia Espinosa.

UN Climate Change and the UK government “agreed to work closely with the COP Bureau members over the next few weeks to identify a suitable date for Cop26,” the statement added.

As of 1 April, coronavirus had killed more than 37,200 people worldwide, according to the World Health Organisation. The Cop26 venue, the Scottish Event Campus, is being turned into a temporary hospital with an initial 300 beds to increase patient capacity in Scotland during the Covid-19 crisis.

The postponement will give some clarity to governments and diplomats who have been waiting to know the impact of the pandemic on this year’s climate timetable.

It also means governments around the world will have more time to assess the likely stark impact of the US presidential election, on 3 November, on global efforts to avert more heatwaves, wildfires and rising sea levels.

The US will formally leave the Paris Agreement on 4 November, under a decision by President Donald Trump. Democratic candidates to take on Trump – Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders – have pledged to immediately rejoin the Paris Agreement if they win.

That means a Democratic victory would make the US a leading voice for climate action at the postponed Cop26, and a mere observer if Trump wins a second term.

“Soon, economies will restart. This is a chance for nations to recover better, to include the most vulnerable in those plans, and a chance to shape the 21st century economy in ways that are clean, green, healthy, just, safe and more resilient,” Espinosa said.

“Postponing Cop26 … is the right thing to do – public health and safety must come first now,” said Laurence Tubiana, an architect of the Paris Agreement and CEO of the European Climate Foundation.

Speaking to reporters before the announcement, Tubiana said the pandemic had made carrying out the formal international diplomacy necessary for countries to ramp up their climate plans “really difficult”.

“I think we have to be innovative on the way we keep the momentum going,” she said, adding that governments would have to move away “from a diplomacy only focused on UN Climate Change” and coordinate with others on how stimulus packages can help accelerate the green transition.

Christiana Figueres, former head of UN Climate Change, added “there can be no pushing off the urgent need for climate action in 2020”.

Earlier this year, the UK called the summit its top international priority for 2020, a year when London is also trying to sort out a new relationship with the European Union after Brexit.

In 2021, the UK is due to preside over the G7 and Italy, which submitted a joint bid with London to preside over Cop26 and is due to organise preparatory events known as the pre-Cop, the G20.

Governments are under pressure to submit tougher climate plans to the UN this year to bridge the gap between current levels of commitments to cut emissions and levels needed to limit global temperature rise “well below 2C”, in line with the Paris Agreement goals.

So far, only four countries – the Marshall Islands, Suriname, Norway and Moldova – have submitted more ambitious climate plans to the UN. On Monday, Japan became the first G7 country to submit an updated plan, but it merely reaffirmed its existing 2030 goal, set in 2015.

If the talks are postponed well into 2021, governments will also have what is likely to be a bleak report about the mounting risks of global warming from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), due to be published in mid-April.

The virus outbreak is also threatening developing countries’ plans to step up climate action this year as expert meetings are being postponed and resources are mobilised to address the public health crisis.

Speaking to Climate Home News, Tenzin Wangmo, of Bhutan and the lead negotiator for the group of Least Developed Countries (LDC), said most countries had only started to work on this climate plans when the virus spread across the world.

“It’s going to be tough to submit climate plans this year,” agreed Carlos Fuller, of Belize and the lead negotiator for the Alliance of Small Island States.

CREDIT: Climate Home News

CARICOM COVID-19 Food Security and Livelihoods Impact Survey

The COVID-19 crisis is rapidly altering how people can earn a living and access food. In order to provide more information on these critical issues, CARICOM has launched a survey on the impact of COVID-19 on food security, livelihoods and access to markets. Prepared by the World Food Programme with support from the Food and Agriculture Organization, it contains 15 questions and takes less than 5 minutes to complete. The survey can be accessed by anyone with the link, and the results will be communicated through a dashboard and information products.

CARICOM COVID-19 Food Security and Livelihoods Impact Survey link: https://arcg.is/1SuCrb

The level of information per country/territory will depend on the number of responses. Wide distribution is therefore critical. We request that you:  ​

  • Distribute the “CARICOM COVID-19 Food Security and Livelihoods Impact Survey” link via email, WhatsApp, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media
  • Contact other government agencies and partners to request them to circulate the link ​
  • Circulate through media channels

Summary Report of the Pre-Bid Meeting for the ITB No: #13/2020/WSRN S-Barbados/GCF/CCCCC – Design, Supply, Installation and Commissioning of 4.5 MW Solar photovoltaic generation and 2.0 MW MicroTurbine systems

ITB No: #13/2020/WSRN S-Barbados/GCF/CCCCC – Design, Supply, Installation and Commissioning of 4.5 MW Solar photovoltaic generation and 2.0 MW MicroTurbine systems

The Pre- Bid Meeting and Site Visit was held on Tuesday March 10th, 2020 commencing 10:00 am (Barbados time) at the Barbados Water Authority Training Room Annex.

Peruse the Summary Report of the Pre-Bid Meeting.

For more information, see:

The deadline for submission of Bids was Tuesday, March 31st 2020 at 10:00 AM (Barbados Time which is GMT-4).

 

CLARIFICATION #7 & 8: ITB No: #13/2020/WSRN S-Barbados/GCF/CCCCC – Design, Supply, Installation and Commissioning of 4.5 MW Solar photovoltaic generation and 2.0 MW MicroTurbine systems

Invitation for Bids: “Design, Supply, Installation and Commissioning of 4.5 MW Solar photovoltaic generation and 2.0 MW MicroTurbine systems and other Components for specified Barbados Water Authority Pumping Stations”: Ref: ICB No. Contract # 13/2020/WSRN S-Barbados/GCF/CCCCC: Response #7 and #8 to Additional Queries Raised We write with reference to paragraph 7.1 of the Instructions to Bidders (ITB) that addresses the subject of ‘Clarification of Bidding Documents’. In accordance with paragraph 7.1 of the ITB, a Bidder requiring any clarification of the Bidding Document shall contact the Centre (the Employer) in writing or raise enquiries during the pre-Bid meeting. The Centre / Employer shall: (i) respond in writing, provided the clarification is requested prior to the deadline for clarification and (ii) forward its response to all potential bidders who acquired the Bidding Document. The Centre / Employer is also required to include in the response a description of the inquiry without identifying its source. Peruse the additional queries received to date and Centre’s responses as follows: For more information, see: The deadline for submission of Bids is Tuesday, March 31st 2020 at 10:00 AM (Barbados Time which is GMT-4).

Message from the Executive Director, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre to Our Partners and Stakeholders

Letter-to-Stakeholder-Partners-Friends

Sampling being conducted under the Arundo donax Alternative Energy Project

On Tuesday, March 10, the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) carried out destructive sampling on samples of the Arundo donax at their Central Farm Facilities, in Cayo, Belize. Here members of the CARDI and Belize’s Sugar Industry Research and Development Institute (SIRDI) teams check cuttings from the Arundo donax, also known as ‘wild cane’ for signs of germination.

Both CARDI and SIRDI are working with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), to research the germination and growth rates in two varieties of wild grasses under the Arundo donax Alternative Energy Project. The Centre is investigating the plant for its suitability as an alternative or supplementary fuel to bagasse for electricity co-generation. The Centre is working with the Green Climate Fund, CARDI and the local sugar industry on this the final stages of the Project.

CARDI and SIRDI are also looking to find the best planting and cultivating conditions for commercial quantities of the grasses. If current studies are favourable, the Project aims to introduce the Arundo donax as a new high energy crop for cultivation as a supplementary fuel for the generation of electricity in Belize. Stay tuned for more information on this exciting Project.

CLARIFICATION #6: ITB No: #13/2020/WSRN S-Barbados/GCF/CCCCC – Design, Supply, Installation and Commissioning of 4.5 MW Solar photovoltaic generation and 2.0 MW MicroTurbine systems

Invitation for Bids: “Design, Supply, Installation and Commissioning of 4.5 MW Solar photovoltaic generation and 2.0 MW MicroTurbine systems and other Components for specified Barbados Water Authority Pumping Stations”:

Ref: ICB No. Contract # 13/2020/WSRN S-Barbados/GCF/CCCCC: Response #6 to Additional Queries Raised

We write with reference to paragraph 7.1 of the Instructions to Bidders (ITB) that addresses the subject of ‘Clarification of Bidding Documents’. In accordance with paragraph 7.1 of the ITB, a Bidder requiring any clarification of the Bidding Document shall contact the Centre (the Employer) in writing or raise enquiries during the pre-Bid meeting. The Centre / Employer shall: (i) respond in writing, provided the clarification is requested prior to the deadline for clarification and (ii) forward its response to all potential bidders who acquired the Bidding Document. The Centre / Employer is also required to include in the response a description of the inquiry without identifying its source.

Peruse the additional queries received to date and Centre’s responses as follows:

For more information, see:

The deadline for submission of Bids is Tuesday, March 31st 2020 at 10:00 AM (Barbados Time which is GMT-4).

Request for Expressions of Interest – Strategy Framework Consultancy

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre is seeking the services of a Consulting Firm for a Strategy Framework Consultancy that aims to produce the following outputs:

  1. Institutional Assessment / Capacity Development Plan;
  2. Strategic and Implementation Plan;
  3. Resource Mobilization Plan; and
  4. Communication Strategy.

Peruse the official Request for Expressions of Interest and its associated Terms of Reference containing additional instructions and information.

Interested Firms are invited to submit their Expression of Interest no later than 10:00 AM Belize time (GMT-6) on Thursday, April 2nd, 2020 to the email address procurement@caribbeanclimate.bz.

Community Multi-purpose Emergency Center (CMEC) nearing completion

Cayo North Resource and Resilience Center

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC/5Cs) is putting the final touches on the Cayo North Resource and Resilience Centre in San Ignacio, Cayo, one of eight country projects being implemented by the Centre under an Agreement between the Italian Ministry of the Environment, Land and Sea (IMELS) and Participating Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member Countries. The building is over 14,800 square feet and has space for offices and recreational activities. Once the project is complete, the building will be fully self-sufficient serve as both a Community Centre and Emergency Shelter.  Stay tuned for more information.

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