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CCCCC broadens campaign on impact of climate change


The Belize-based Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) says it has broadened its “1.5 ˚C to Stay Alive” campaign that was launched ahead of COP15 in Copenhagen in December 2009.

The two tiered campaign sought to sensitize citizens across the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) about the impact of climate change on livelihoods in the region, and make a convincing case at the global level for the reduction of green house gasses (GHG) emissions to a level not exceeding 350 ppm (parts per million) as an effective means of stabilising global warming.

The Copenhagen Accord contained several key elements on which there was strong convergence of the views of governments. This included the long-term goal of limiting the maximum global average temperature increase to no more than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, subject to a review in 2015.

There was, however, no agreement on how to do this in practical terms. It also included a reference to consider limiting the temperature increase to below 1.5 degrees – a key demand made by vulnerable developing countries.

The CCCCC said it has since broadened its effort through the crafting of curricular resources designed for Caribbean children ages 12 to 16.

It said that these resources, crafted by educators in collaboration with the Centre’s technical team, forms part of the  thrust to embed climate change in the region’s education sector beginning in Belize.

“The Caribbean is among the most vulnerable group of countries to the effects of climate change and climate variability.  Given its particularly youthful population, the Region must engage this significant demographic to shape a robust and appropriate range of responses to ensure climate resilience and safeguard livelihoods,” said CCCCC’s communication specialist, Tyrone Hall.

“The Centre has been long interested in developing a comprehensive programme that can build awareness and move the Region’s youth towards meaningful action.

“We ran a youth forum on climate change in Belize about four years ago, and one of the outcomes from that initiative was the need for climate change education to be mainstreamed into the education sector. So the 1.5 Stay Alive Education Initiative is a response to that particular finding,” he added.

Hall said that the CCCCC will be piloting the resource in Belize, “while simultaneously working with our partners throughout the region to have it utilized.

“Earth Hour Caribbean is just around the corner and we’ll be using that as an opportunity to really publicize the resource.”

The four unit curriculum – The Warming Climate, Sea Level Rise, Pine Forest and Social Impacts of Global Warming – includes classroom face to face interaction, field trips, workbooks and varied assessments, has a total of 46 wide-ranging lessons with supporting resources and several videos.

CMC/pr/ir/2014

Credit: CMC; Also see the Antigua Observer.

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