caribbeanclimate

Our Tweets

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,228 other followers

Archives

Contact Info

501 822-1104
Mon - Fri 8am to 5pm (-6 GMT)

Blog Stats

  • 111,464 hits

RSS CARICOM RSS Feed

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Webinar: : Seven years of research on climate resilience in the Caribbean: Government, communities, climate data and the case for action

Seven years of climate resilience research in the Caribbean: making the case for action Day: Wednesday 29th March Time: 8:30- 09:30 am (CST, time in Belize) Check the time zone change according to your location: http://bit.ly/2mJfbgn Register here: http://bit.ly/2nLRsy2 Agenda Introduction Maria José Pacha. Knowledge Management and Networks Coordinator – CDKN Latin America and Caribbean Seven … Continue reading

POLICY BRIEF: Climate data and projections: Supporting evidence-based decision-making in the Caribbean

Photo Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Download POLICY BRIEF: Climate data and projections: Supporting evidence-based decision-making in the Caribbean
No. of pages: 12
Author(s): Will Bugler, Olivia Palin and Dr Ben Rabb
Organisation(s): Acclimatise 
Format: pdf
File size: 620.51 KB

Governments in the Caribbean recognise climate variability and change to be the most significant threat to sustainable development in the region. Policies and strategies such as the regional framework for achieving development resilient to climate change and its implementation plan acknowledge the scale of the threat and provide a plan that aspires to safeguard regional prosperity and meet development goals. To do this, decision-makers need effective tools and methods to help integrate climate change considerations into their planning and investment processes. To build resilience, decision-makers can benefit from access to appropriate climate change data that are specific to their geographical location and relevant to their planning horizons.

The CARibbean Weather Impacts Group (CARIWIG) project, funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), gives access to climate data that have been downscaled, making them relevant for use in the Caribbean region. The project also provides tools that allow decision-makers to better understand the potential impacts of drought, tropical storms, rainfall and temperature changes. Caribbean decision-makers, researchers and scientists can access this data freely, through the CARIWIG website.

While these data are a useful aid for decision-making, they do not provide certainty about the scale or timing of climate impacts. The process of downscaling data makes them relevant to decisions taken at the national level in the Caribbean, but also increases the uncertainty. The data should therefore be used to inform decisions, but should not form the sole basis for action. Instead, decisions-makers should aspire to take adaptation measures that perform well over a wide range of conditions.

This policy brief provides an overview of CARIWIG data and information and how they can be used, pointing to illustrative examples of how they have been applied in several Caribbean countries. It also provides decision-makers with the tools necessary to make effective climate decisions in the face of uncertainty.

Key messages

  • Climate data and projections that are relevant to the Caribbean region are available through the online CARIWIG portal.
  • Historical climate data and future projections are available for a range of climate variables.
  • A suite of simulation tools, including a weather generator, a tropical storm model and a regional drought analysis tool are also freely available.
  • These resources are useful for decision makers. When combined with other data and information, they can help to build a picture of potential impacts to key economic sectors in the Caribbean.
  • A series of case studies shows how these resources have been applied to real-world situations in Caribbean countries.
  • The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is providing training and support on how to use CARIWIG outputs.
  • CDKN-funded projects provide methods and tools for decision makers to take proactive action to build climate resilience, despite the uncertainty that comes with future
Credit: Climate & Development Knowledge Network (CDKN)

Office of Climate Change spearheads ‘green’ agenda sessions in Schools-Regions 4, 5, 6 and 10 to benefit in first quarter of 2017

The Office of Climate Change (OCC), which falls under the purview of the Ministry of the Presidency, in collaboration with the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN), yesterday, visited three schools in East Berbice-Corentyne (Region Six) to continue its countrywide Climate Change sessions, which are aimed at educating students on the effects of the global phenomenon … Continue reading

CDB provides funds for poverty reduction in 8 Caribbean countries

The Barbados-based Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) says it is providing US$40 million in funding for poverty reduction in eight Caribbean through the Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF). It said the resources will support improved access to quality education; water and sanitation; basic community access and drainage; livelihoods enhancement and human resource development services in low-income … Continue reading

Message from the Caribbean Community Secretariat to Commemorate International Women’s Day, 8 March, 2017

International Women's Day 2017

Photo Credit: CCCCC, International Women's Day 2017

The Caribbean Community joins with the global community in celebrating International Women’s Day 2017. The theme for this Forty-Second observance is #BeBoldForChange; a clarion call for all citizens of our Region and the world to play their part in forging more gender inclusive, just societies.

Over the past four decades, Member States of our Community have made legally binding commitments through various conventions and agreements to fulfill obligations related to human rights, gender equality and the empowerment of women. These include the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (SDGs) recognises in profound ways that the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls is crucial for targeted world progress towards poverty eradication and indeed represents a call for the world to #BeBoldForChange.

The recent 20 year Review of the Beijing Platform for Action in 2015, highlighted some areas of progress related to gender equality and empowerment of women in the Caribbean region. These include new legislation to address gender based violence; women’s increased participation and achievement at secondary and tertiary levels of education; increased representation of women in governments, particularly in the public service and reduced maternal mortality and the spread of HIV.  However, persistent challenges in enforcing the principles of equality and non-discrimination were highlighted in several areas important to the development of our region, including:

  • women’s full participation in paid employment as wage discrimination persists with women earning on average 19 percent less than men;
  • governance remains tilted in favour of male leadership in the public and private sectors; and
  • gender-based violence continues with great intensity and impacts on the health, social and economic well-being of families, particularly women and children.

Many countries in CARICOM have taken ‘bold steps’  to enact legislation to promote the rights of women in conformance with the CEDAW Convention and based on CARICOM Model Legislation in eight areas, namely citizenship, domestic violence, equality for women in employment, equal pay, sexual harassment and sexual offences, inheritance, maintenance and maintenance orders. Several countries have also introduced national gender policies to guide the work of the national gender machineries and mainstream gender across the work of government.

The World Economic Forum has reported in the Global Gender Gap Index, 2016 that some CARICOM Member States, namely Barbados, The Bahamas, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago have made progress towards closing the gender gap by between 72 – 74%. The Index is based on four key areas – health, education, the economy and politics. The overall global forecast is that the gender gap won’t be closed completely until 2186, some 169 years from now! This signals that there is much more work to be done.

Being ‘Bold for Change’ signals the need for deliberate steps by all to realise gender equality. As a Community, let us redouble our efforts: men and women, boys and girls, to embrace that bolder and more transformative agenda with strong partnerships among government, the private sector and civil society.  The time for your advocacy and activism, is now!

Today, let us salute the women in our Caribbean Community and all over the world as we celebrate International Women’s Day 2017!

Credit: CARICOM Secretariat

Global conference renews call to reduce greenhouse gas

The fifth Regional Platform for disaster risk reduction in the Americas began in Canada today with the United Nations (UN) reiterating a call for the reduction of greenhouse gases that it has labelled “the single most urgent global disaster risk treatment”. Head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, Robert Glasser told a … Continue reading

Cuba Seeks To Revitalize Association Of Caribbean States

CubaCuba is seeking to revitalize Association of Caribbean States (ACS) as ACS’ First Cooperation Conference to be held today, March 8, Cuba’s foreign ministry announced on Tuesday.

At a press conference, Carlos Zamora, director of Latin America and the Caribbean of the Cuban Foreign Ministry, said this meeting seeks to evaluate the state of implementation of the cooperation programs developed within the ACS.

Furthermore, Caribbean nations will discuss air and maritime connectivity and the ACS agenda for tackling climate change.

“Within the process of revitalizing the association, we have been looking at how to strengthen the issue of cooperation, both internal and external, in order for the ACS to play a vital role in the economic development of the Caribbean. This conference is aimed at that,” explained Zamora.

Cuba took over the presidency of the ACS in January 2016 and for more than a year has presented projects to strengthen its cooperation system, confronting the effects of climate change and natural disasters, as well as solidarity initiatives with Haiti.

In addition, the 22nd Ordinary Meeting of the ACS Council of Ministers will be held on March 10 in Havana.

“A few governments have changed in the region, as well as economic and political circumstances have been transformed, and of course this council of ministers will be in the midst of those circumstances,” said the high official.

The event will have a wide participation of the 25 foreign ministers of the member states and eight associates, as well as special organizations that have accompanied the ACS since its creation in July 1994 in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia.

Credit: Curacao Chronicle

Building climate resilience is integral to continued prosperity in the Caribbean

The escalating cost of climate change to the Caribbean region makes a compelling argument for taking early action for adapting to climate change. An analysis of ten years of climate change research in the Caribbean found that sectors that are vital to regional economic and social development, including agriculture and tourism, are especially vulnerable to … Continue reading

Caribbean | Early Warning System to Help Caribbean Fishermen Deal With ClimateFishermen who depend on fishing for a living need an early warning system Change

Fishermen who depend on fishing for a living need an early warning system

Fishermen who depend on fishing for a living need an early warning system

The challenges of climate change and variability faced by fishermen and women in four Caribbean countries are to be addressed through early warning and emergency response tools being developed under the Caribbean Regional Track of the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience (PPCR).

The information, communication and technology (ICT) solution, which is being developed by the ICT4Fisheries Consortium in collaboration with the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM), will work to reduce risks to fishers’ lives and livelihoods posed by climate change and climate variability. The ICT4Fisheries Consortium is a multidisciplinary team comprising members from The University of the West Indies (UWI), the University of Cape Town and the Caribbean Network of Fisherfolk Organizations.

Possible impacts of long term climate change trends and short term extreme weather events on Caribbean fisheries include damage to fishing and aquaculture community infrastructure, including roads, harbours, farms and houses caused by sea level rise and stronger storms, as well as unsafe fishing conditions and loss of life at sea as a result of strong storms and hurricanes, according to a 2015 study published by the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO).

Other hazards influenced by climate, such as sargassum seaweed, are also of deep concern to fishers.

The ICT-based early warning system is expected to reduce fisher folks’ vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Using an application for mobile phones, fishers will be able to receive early warnings of risky weather and sea conditions.

The mobile application will also be used to encourage fishers to share their local knowledge to support and improve climate-smart fisheries planning, management and decision-making. The system will be integrated within existing national disaster risk management and emergency response frameworks, and its main focus will be on communications.

The new system will be tested in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, Dominica and St. Lucia and it will take into account the specific situations of target countries.

“ICT4Fisheries will not only develop and deploy the tools but will also provide training in their use and administration to country and regional level stakeholders.  The system should be in place by 2018,” according to an official statement issued here.

The Caribbean PPCR is a regional programme that consists of six individual country pilots in Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines, and a regional track of activities which supports resilience building in these countries and, will also provide benefits to the wider Caribbean.

Credit: Wired JA Online News

CARICOM prepares positions on imminent UN oceans agreement

Senior environment officials from the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) met recently in Belize as CARICOM rationalises its position on the United Nations (UN) process to establish an international legally binding agreement on sustainable use of marine resources. The two-day workshop held 20-22 February 2017, in Belize City, Belize, was titled, ‘CARICOM Regional Workshop on the Conservation … Continue reading

Flickr Photos

International Women's Day 2017

Welcome Address by Sharon Lindo, Policy Advisor, CCCCC

Christopher Cushing, Chief of Mission, USAID

Dr. Kenrick Leslie's address

Dr. Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director, CCCCC

More Photos
%d bloggers like this: