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Request for Expressions of Interest: Consultant – Investigate Climate Change Data Management Regimes in the Caribbean

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is inviting Individual Consultants to submit Expressions of Interest to investigate the many issues facing climate change data management – from data capture to evidence–based decision-making – and to determine an appropriate and effective suite of solutions in the form of a protocol (or other mechanism).

Peruse the following official documents: Request for Expressions of Interest and related Terms of Reference.

Expressions of interest must be delivered electronically by 10:00 am Belize time (GMT-6) on Monday, September 10, 2018, to the email address mnestor@caribbeanclimate.bz. Please make the subject line of any email communication on this matter: “EOI – Climate Change Data Management Study”.

Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre

CREWS SLU

CREWS buoy in Soufrière, St. Lucia 

In March this year, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) began installation of five new data buoys to expand the Caribbean Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Network to enhance the regions ability to monitor and study the effects of warming seas.

The installation is being carried out in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and with the assistance of the governments of
the recipient countries of Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Saint Lucia, St. Kitts and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The purchase and installation of the buoys were funded under the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Climate Change Adaptation Program (CCAP) which is being implemented by the Center. The expansion of the CREWS Network is aimed at enhancing the collection and availability of critical data from across the Eastern Caribbean by increasing the data points, and improving the region’s ability to track changes in a range of environmental variables including sea temperature and water quality.

The Center’s partnership with NOAA is part of a global coral reef monitoring network. The new CREWS stations have already begun to provide additional information to Caribbean scientists and researchers to monitor reef health, sea temperature changes, winds (speed and gusts), barometric pressure, precipitation, photo-synthetically active/available radiation (PAR, light), air temperature, and salinity. Other instruments may be added through arrangement with the host countries.

Under a previous sponsorship arrangement, CREWS stations were installed in Belize, Trinidad & Tobago, the Dominican Republic, and Barbados.

Credit: Environmental Monitor; Summer 2018
Peruse full magazine here.

CCCCC and the IAEA sign ‘Practical Arrangement’ in Vienna, Austria

VIENNA, August 8, 2018: The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) signed an agreement to pursue areas of technical cooperation in the use of nuclear science and technology to combat climate change in the Caribbean, at the headquarters of the IAEA in Vienna, Austria on August 8.

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The signing of a technical cooperation agreement between the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) took place on August 8, 2018 at the headquarters of the IAGA in Vienna Austria. Signing the agreement are Dr. Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director, CCCCC and Ms. Najat Mokhtar, IAEA Director, for the Technical Cooperation Department, Division of Asia and the Pacific (representing the Deputy Director General Mr. Dazhu Yang).

The Practical Arrangement provides the framework for collaboration to address challenges faced by the Member States of both organisations and as Small Island Developing States in meeting the mitigation and adaptation challenges of climate change. Signing the agreement were Executive Director of the CCCCC Kenrick Leslie and Ms Najat Mokhtar Director, Technical Cooperation Department, Division of Asia and the Pacific, representing Dazhu Yang, Deputy Director General.

The Caribbean Community Member States that are party to the IAEA as well as the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM), the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) and the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) are also meeting at the IAEA Headquarters to work out the details on a technical cooperation programme that would use nuclear science and technology to build climate resilience within the region.

During the meeting participants are exposed to the work of the IAEA in the areas of food and agriculture, the marine environment, energy planning and water resource management.  The participants are also scheduled to visit the Isotope Hydrology Lab and the Seibersdorf-based Agriculture and Biotechnology labs.

The IAEA helps countries to use nuclear science and technology to monitor emissions and environmental changes to the ocean and ecosystems, mitigate sources of greenhouse gas emissions from energy production and land use, and adapt to new climate realities including food and water shortages and ecosystem losses.

The CCCCC is the responsible agency within the Caribbean Community to assist the Member States to mitigate and adapt to the challenges of climate change.

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Left to Right: Maria del Pilar Murrillo, PMO, TCLAC; Sharon Lindo, Policy Adviser CCCCC; Luis Longoria, Director, Division for Latin America and the Caribbean; Ulric Trotz, Deputy Director, CCCCC; Najat Mokhtar, Director, Division for Asia and Pacific; Kenrick Leslie, Executive Director, CCCCC; Milton Haughton, Executive Director, CRFM; Magali Zapata, PMO, TCLAC and Barton Clarke, Executive Director, CARDI at the headquarters of the IAGA in Vienna Austria. The group represented the region at a meeting to work out the details of a technical cooperation programme that would use nuclear science and technology to build climate resilience within the region.

END

Invitation To Bid – Construction Of Community Multi-Purpose Emergency Center In San Ignacio

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) invites sealed bidsfrom eligible bidders for the construction of a Community Multi-Purpose Emergency Center (CMEC) at the Victor Galvez Stadium in San Ignacio Town, Cayo District, BELIZE (“the Works”).

The selected Bidder will be expected to commence the Works by September 2018 and complete the Works no later than December 2018. Sealed bids must be delivered at the CCCCC’s Office in Belmopan, BELIZE by Tuesday August 7, 2018 at 2:00 pm.  

Peruse the official Bidding Documents and Site Visit Report.

Relevant drawing, plans and technical specifications may be obtained on CD at the CCCCC’s office.

Vacancy – PACT: Communications Officer for the REDD+ Readiness Project

The Government of Belize with the assistance of the World Bank is implementing the project entitled “Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) Readiness Project in Belize” with Grant funding from the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility “FCPF” and has appointed the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment, Sustainable Development and Immigration (MAFFESDI) for the overall implementation of the Project with the fiduciary support provided by the Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT).  The Government of Belize intends to apply part of the proceeds of the grant to payments under the contract for this Consultancy. REDD+ is seeking to recruit an International Consultant for Legal and Institutional Framework.

Peruse the official advertisement: Communications Officer.

Deadline for application is 3:00 p.m. on Friday 10th August 2018.

For further information and clarification, please send email to redd.procurement.officer@pactbelize.org.

Vacancy – PACT: International Consultant for Legal and Institutional Framework for REDD+ Implementation in Belize

The Government of Belize with the assistance of the World Bank is implementing the project entitled “Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) Readiness Project in Belize” with Grant funding from the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility “FCPF” and has appointed the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment, Sustainable Development and Immigration (MAFFESDI) for the overall implementation of the Project with the fiduciary support provided by the Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT).  The Government of Belize intends to apply part of the proceeds of the grant to payments under the contract for this Consultancy. REDD+ is seeking to recruit an International Consultant for Legal and Institutional Framework.

Peruse the official advertisement: International Consultant for Legal and Institutional Framework.

Deadline for application is 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday 15th August, 2018.

For further information and clarification, please send email to redd.procurement.officer@pactbelize.org.

Strengthening Cuban Coastal Landscape in the Face of Climate Change

The 37-metre tall lighthouse is a symbol of the municipality of Maisí. Built in 1862, it is located at the eastern tip of Cuba, in the province of Guantánamo. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

The 37-metre tall lighthouse is a symbol of the municipality of Maisí. Built in 1862, it is located at the eastern tip of Cuba, in the province of Guantánamo. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

Strong winds agitate the sea that crashes over Punta de Maisí, the most extreme point in eastern Cuba, where no building stands on the coast made up of rocky areas intermingled with vegetation and with sandy areas where people can swim and sunbathe.

A little inland, a white, well-kept lighthouse rises 37 metres above sea level. Standing there since 1862, it is an icon of the municipality of Maisí, in the province of Guantánamo, in the east of this Caribbean island nation of 11.2 million inhabitants.

“Occasionally there’s a cyclone. Matthew recently passed by and devastated this area,” said Hidalgo Matos, who has been the lighthouse keeper for more than 40 years.

Matos was referring to the last major disaster to strike the area, when Hurricane Matthew, category four on the one to five Saffir-Simpson scale, hit Guantánamo on Oct. 4-5, 2016.

Thanks to this rare trade, which has been maintained from generation to generation by the three families who live next to the lighthouse, the 64-year-old Matos has seen from the privileged height of the tower the fury of the sea and the winds from the hurricanes that are devastating Cuba and other Caribbean islands, more and more intensely due to climate change.

“One of the benefits of the area is that the majority of the population makes a living from fishing,” said the lighthouse-keeper.

This is the main reason why coastal populations are reluctant to leave their homes by the sea, and even return after being relocated to safer areas inland.

Facing this and other obstacles, the Cuban authorities in the 1990s began to modify the management of coastal areas, which was accelerated with the implementation in 2017 of the first government plan to address climate change, better known as Life Task.

Currently, more than 193,000 people live in vulnerable areas, in conditions that will only get worse, as the sea level is forecast to rise 27 centimetres by 2050 and 85 centimetres by 2100.

The relocation of coastal communities and the restoration of native landscapes are key to boosting resilience in the face of extreme natural events.

Hidalgo Matos is the keeper of the lighthouse located in Punta de Maisí at the eastern tip of Cuba, in the province of Guantánamo. From his watchtower, he has witnessed the effects of climate change - the increasingly recurrent and extreme natural events. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

Hidalgo Matos is the keeper of the lighthouse located in Punta de Maisí at the eastern tip of Cuba, in the province of Guantánamo. From his watchtower, he has witnessed the effects of climate change – the increasingly recurrent and extreme natural events. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

Scientists say that natural elements of coastal protection such as sandy beaches, sea grasses, reefs and mangroves cushion the tides.

Of the country’s 262 coastal settlements, 121 are estimated to be affected by climate change. Of these, 67 are located on the north coast, which was affected almost in its entirety by the powerful Hurricane Irma in September 2017, and 54 are in the south.

In total, 34,454 people, 11,956 year-round homes, 3,646 holiday homes and 1,383 other facilities are at risk.

Cuban authorities reported that 93 of the 262 coastal settlements had been the target of some form of climate change adaptation and mitigation action by 2016.

Measures for relocation to safer areas were also being carried out in 65 of these communities, 25 had partial plans for housing relocation, 22 had to be completely relocated from the shoreline, and another 56 were to be reaccommodated, rehabilitated and protected.

“There are no plans to move any settlements or people in the municipality because after Cyclone Matthew everything was moved,” said Eddy Pellegrin, a high-level official in the government of Maisí, with a population of 28,752 people who depend mostly on agriculture.

“Since 2015 we have been working on it. From that year to 2017, we relocated some 120 people,” he said in an interview with IPS in Punta de Maisí.

The view towards the mainland from the emblematic lighthouse in the farming town of Maisí, at the eastern tip of Cuba, where the municipal government is implementing several projects to adapt the vulnerable coastline to climate change. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

The view towards the mainland from the emblematic lighthouse in the farming town of Maisí, at the eastern tip of Cuba, where the municipal government is implementing several projects to adapt the vulnerable coastline to climate change. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

A total of 840 people live along the 254 km of coastline in this municipality, “who are not in dangerous or vulnerable places,” the official said, discussing the national programme to manage the coastal area that Maisí is preparing to conclude with a local development project.

“There is no need to make new investments in the coastal area, what remains is to plant sea grapes (Coccoloba uvifera) to increase production,” he said of a local development project that consists of planting these bushes typical of the beaches, to restore the natural protective barrier and produce wine from the fruit.

Punta de Maisí and Boca de Jauco are the areas to be reforested with sea grape plants.

Pellegrin added that coconut groves – a key element of Guantánamo’s economy – will be replanted 250 m from the coast.

Maisí is an illustration of the long-term challenges and complexities of coastal management, ranging from the demolition of poorly located homes and facilities, to changing the economic alternatives in those communities that depend on fishing, to major engineering works.

Guantánamo has been hit continuously in recent years by major hurricanes: Sandy (2012), Matthew (2016) and Irma (2017), in addition to the severe drought between 2014 and 2017 that affected virtually the entire country.

“The latest atmospheric phenomena have affected the entire coastal area,” Daysi Sarmiento, an official in the government of the province of Guantánamo, told IPS.

Sports coach Milaydis Griñán lives near the historic Punta de Maisí lighthouse on the eastern tip of the Cuban island. Members of three families have worked as lighthouse keepers for generations. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

Sports coach Milaydis Griñán lives near the historic Punta de Maisí lighthouse on the eastern tip of the Cuban island. Members of three families have worked as lighthouse keepers for generations. Credit: Jorge Luis Baños/IPS

“Now Baracoa Bay is being dredged,” said Sarmiento, referring to Baracoa, the first town in the area built by the Spaniards in colonial times, which faces the worst coastal risks.

The dredging is part of investments expected to be completed in September to protect Baracoa’s coast, which is highly vulnerable to floods, hurricanes and tsunamis.

By August 2017, the authorities had eliminated more than 900 state facilities and 673 private buildings from beaches nationwide. On the sandy coasts in this area alone, a total of 14,103 irregularly-built constructions were identified at the beginning of the Life Task plan.

The central provinces of Ciego de Avila and Sancti Spíritus are the only ones that today have beaches free of zoning and urban planning violations.

There are at least six laws that protect the coastline in various ways, in particular Decree-Law 212 on “Coastal Area Management”, which has been in force since 2000 and prohibits human activities that accelerate natural soil erosion, a problem that had not been given importance for decades.

“The community has grown further away from the coast,” sports coach Milaydis Griñán told IPS. She defines herself as Cuba’s “first inhabitant” because of the proximity of her humble home to the Punta de Maisí lighthouse, which is still recovering from the impacts of Hurricane Matthew.

“The risks have been high because we are very close to the beach, especially when there is a storm or hurricane or tsunami alert, but we don’t have plans for relocation inland,” she said.

Credit: Inter Press Service (IPS) News Agency

Urgent Action Needed to Safeguard Saint Lucia’s Biodiversity

Climate change and a lack of care for the environment could have devastating consequences for Saint Lucia’s healthy ecosystems and rich biodiversity. Credit: Desmond Brown/IPS

Climate change and a lack of care for the environment could have devastating consequences for Saint Lucia’s healthy ecosystems and rich biodiversity. Credit: Desmond Brown/IPS

Wildlife conservationists consider it to be one of the most striking parrots of its kind. Saint Lucia’s best-known species, the endangered Amazon parrot, is recognised by its bright green plumage, purple forehead and dusty red-tipped feathers. But a major conservation organisation is warning that climate change and a lack of care for the environment could have devastating consequences for Saint Lucia’s healthy ecosystems and rich biodiversity, including the parrot.

Sean Southey chairs the Commission on Education and Communication (CEC) of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

He told IPS that urgent action is needed to safeguard the eastern Caribbean island nation’s biodiversity, which is under constant threat.

“With climate change, countries like St. Lucia [experience] significant weather events. The increase in hurricanes, the increase in bad weather and mudslides – these are incredible consequences of climate change,” Southey said.

“As you drive across the landscape of St. Lucia, you see a landscape strewn with old plastic bags,” Sean Southey, chair of the Commission on Education and Communication.

Though less than 616 square kilometres in area, St. Lucia is exceptionally rich in animals and plants. The island is home to more than 2,000 native species, of which nearly 200 species occur nowhere else.

Other species of conservation concern include the pencil cedar, staghorn coral and St. Lucia racer. The racer, confined to the nine-hectare island of Maria Major, is thought to be the world’s most threatened sake.

Also at risk are mangrove forests and low-lying freshwater wetlands, Southey said.

But he said it was not too late to take action, and he urged St. Lucia and its Caribbean neighbours to take advantage of their small size.

“The smallness of islands allows for real society to get involved. What it means is helping people connect to the environment,” Southey said.

“It means that they need to know and feel and appreciate that their individual behaviours make a difference. Especially the biodiversity decisions [like] land use planning. If you are going to sell your family farm, do you sell for another commercial tourist resort, do you sell it to make a golf course or do you sell it to [produce] organic bananas? These are the type of individual decisions that people have to make that protect an island or hurt an island,” he said.

Southey added that thoughtful management of mangroves and effective management of shorelines, “can create natural mechanisms that allow you to cushion and protect society from the effects of climate change.”

St. Lucia is exceptionally rich in animals and plants. The island is home to more than 2,000 native species, of which nearly 200 species occur nowhere else. Credit: Desmond Brown/IPS

St. Lucia is exceptionally rich in animals and plants. The island is home to more than 2,000 native species, of which nearly 200 species occur nowhere else. Credit: Desmond Brown/IPS

The CEC chair said recent extreme weather events have forced people in the Caribbean to understand climate change more than inhabitants from other countries in the world do.

“If you’re over the age of 30 in the Caribbean, you’ve seen a change in weather patterns. It’s not a story that you hear on the news, it’s a reality that you feel during hurricane season every year. So I believe there is an understanding,” he said.

In September 2017, Hurricane Irma tore through many of St. Lucia’s neighbouring islands, including Barbuda.

The category five hurricane wreaked havoc on Barbuda’s world-famous frigate bird colony. Most of the 10,000-frigate bird population disappeared in the immediate aftermath of the hurricane that destroyed the mangroves in which they nest and breed.

While many countries in the Caribbean are working on building natural barriers and nature-based solutions in response to climate change, Southey still believes there needs to be a greater strengthening of that sense that people can actually do something to contribute.

Reducing plastic waste

In June 2016, Antigua took the lead in the Caribbean with a ban on the commercial use of plastic bags.

The island’s environment and health minister Molwyn Joseph said the decision was made in a bid to reduce the volume of plastic bags that end up in the watercourses and wetlands.

“We are giving our mangroves a fighting chance to be a source of healthy marine life, that can only benefit us as a people,” he said.

Antigua also became the first country within the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States and the second within the Caribbean Community, to ratify the Nagoya Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

The Nagoya Protocol provides a transparent legal framework for the effective implementation of one of the three objectives of the CBD: the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources.

On Jul. 3 this year, one of the Caribbean’s largest supermarket chains launched a campaign to discourage the use of single use plastic bags for bagging groceries at its checkout counters, while actively encouraging customers to shop with reusable bags as a more eco-friendly option.

Managing director of Massy Stores St. Lucia Martin Dorville said the company is focused on finding more permanent solutions to reducing plastic waste and its own demand for plastic bags.

He said the decision to encourage customers to use less plastic was bold, courageous and will help manage the adverse impacts of single use plastic on the environment.

“I am very thrilled that one of the number one supermarkets has decided to ban all plastic bags. It’s a small behaviour but it helps everyone realise that their individual actions make a difference,” Southey told IPS.

“As you drive across the landscape of St. Lucia, you see a landscape strewn with old plastic bags, so I was very appreciative of that. But what I really liked is that when I spent over USD100, they gave me a recyclable bag as a bonus to encourage me to use that as an individual so that my behaviour can make a difference,” he said.

He added that if school children could understand the importance of mangroves and complex eco-systems and the need to protect forests, wildlife and endangered birds “then I think we can make a huge difference.”

Credit: Inter Press Service (IPS) News Agency

Consultancy for the Development of a Land Use Land Cover Map of 2017 Using Sentinel-2 Images for the REDD+ Readiness Project in Belize

The Government of Belize with the assistance of the World Bank is implementing the project entitled “Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) Readiness Project in Belize” with Grant funding from the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility “FCPF” and has appointed the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry the Environment, Sustainable Development and Immigration (MAFFESDI) for the overall implementation of the Project with the fiduciary support provided by the Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT). The Government of Belize intends to apply part of the proceeds of the grant to payments under the contract for this Consultancy.

REDD+ and PACT now invites eligible Consulting Firms to indicate their interest in providing the services.

Peruse the official request for Expression of Interest: EoI for SENTINEL_REV_June 28_2018.

Deadline for the submission of Expression of Interest is 4:00 pm on Friday, July 13, 2018.

For further information and clarification, please send email to redd.procurement.officer@pactbelize.org.

Consultancy for the Development of a Grievance and Redress Mechanism (GRM) for REDD+ Implementation in Belize

The Government of Belize with the assistance of the World Bank is implementing the project entitled “Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) Readiness Project in Belize” with Grant funding from the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility “FCPF” and has appointed the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry the Environment and Sustainable Development (MAFFESD) for the overall implementation of the Project with the fiduciary support provided by the Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT).  The Government of Belize intends to apply part of the proceeds of the grant to payments under the contract for this Consultancy.

REDD+ and PACT now invites eligible Consulting Firms to indicate their interest in providing the services. In submitting its Expression of Interest, Firms should provide information demonstrating that it has the required and relevant experience to perform the Services.

Peruse the Request for Expression of Interest for Consultancy Services

 

Deadline for submission is Tuesday 19th June 2018 by 2:00 p.m.

 

 

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