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Cuban Ambassador to Belize meets with the CCCCC and GoB on Coastal Erosion

Meeting attendees from left to right: Dr. Lennox Gladden, Chief Climate Change Officer of the National Climate Change Office in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment and Sustainable Development; Mr. Miguel Izquierdo, Cuban Coastal Erosion Expert; the Cuban Ambassador to Belize, Her Excellency Mrs. Lissette Pérez; Dr. Jose Juanes, Cuban Coastal Erosion Expert; Dr. Percival Cho, Chief Executive Officer of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Sustainable Development, the Environment, Climate Change and Solid Waste Management Authority and Mr. Ahnivar Peralta, Research Assistant, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre

March 20, 2019; Belmopan, Belize. – The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) hosted a meeting on March 18, at its office in Belmopan, Belize; with the Cuban Ambassador to Belize, Her Excellency Mrs. Lissette Pérez; and representatives from the Government of Belize’s Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Sustainable Development, the Environment, Climate Change and Solid Waste Management Authority, to discuss the Coastal Erosion Assessment conducted by two Cuban Coastal Erosion Specialists.

“We want to formalize and solidify the relationship between Belize and Cuba. Belize acknowledges that Cuba has the know-how and technical capacity to best guide and advise Belize on these issues as we aim to build our national capacity for the sustainability of these initiatives”


Dr. Lennox Gladden, Chief Climate Change Officer of the National Climate Change Office.

On March 13 and 14, 2019, the specialists, Dr. José Luis Juanes and MSc. Miguel Izquierdo from Cuba’s Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (CITMA) also visited the coastal town of Dangriga and Hopkins, a community within its environs to identify the various natural and human factors affecting coastal erosion there.

Hopkins Coastal Area

Beach scarp, dead trees, exposed roots, waves reaching building foundations and some inefficiency coastal protection structures, demonstrate the extent of erosion in Dangriga-Hopkins. Locals estimate that the shoreline has receded by 20 to 25 feet in the last 5 years.

Dangriga Coastal Area
Dangriga Coastal Area

In an effort to stabilize the coastline, the experts discussed possible measures and solutions. Dr. Juanes and Mr. Izquierdo recommended three areas of focus, namely: research, legal direction to define and regulate the coastal zone and the deployment of adequate engineering.

Dr. Percival Cho, Chief Executive Officer noteded: “It is important to structure Belize’s regulatory framework to better govern the development of our beaches.”Her Excellency Mrs. Pérez expressed interest in the actions, best practices and sustainable adaptation initiatives that Belize could undertake to mitigate the damages.

The meeting concluded on the promise of further collaboration between Cuba and Belize to address the issues of coastal erosion and vulnerability as well as other related areas.

Training Workshops conducted in Belize through partnership with NCCO, CCCCC, INSMET and UNDP

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and its partner the Meteorological Institute (INSMET) in Cuba, conducted a series of training workshops between February 11 and March 14, 2019 to assist Belize with its National Communication to the United Nations Conference on Climate Change (UNFCCC) .
The trainings which culminated with a ‘Gender and Communication’ workshop, were held in collaboration with the National Climate Change Office (NCCO) from Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment, Sustainable Development and Immigration in Belize and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) .

Gender and Communication

The two-day ‘Gender and Communication’ workshop was held from March 13 to 14, at the National Trade Show Grounds’ Agriculture Conference room in Belmopan City. It was facilitated by Mrs. Martha Fernandez, Information and Communication Specialist of the Cuban Institute of Marine Sciences (ICIMAR), and Dr. Elizabeth Miranda, Senior Professor in the Latin American Faculty for Social Sciences (FLACSO), University of Havana. The workshop aimed to build the capacity of Technical Officers from the sectors involved in the 4th National Communication by looking at the various gender integrated approaches, communication strategies and communicative products that were utilized by Cuba’s Third National Communication that can be taken into account for Belize’s National Communication.

Participants of the Gender and Communication workshop

Climate Modelling Consultation Meetings for Agriculture, Water, Coastal Zone and Fisheries Sectors

Climate Modelling consultation and meetings were also held with officers in the agriculture, water, coastal zone and fisheries departments of the Belize government. These meetings were held by the Centre in partnership with the Cuban Institute of Meteorology (INSMET), the National Climate Change Office (NCCO) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and ran from February 26 to March 1, 2019.
The meetings which were held in the Centre’s training room focused on determining the climate modelling data needs for key sectors such as the Water, Agriculture, Coastal Zone and Fisheries sectors to produce sector-specific climate impact maps.
These sectors will be investigated as part of Belize’s Sector-Based Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment which is to be conducted under Belize’s Fourth National Communication and First Biennial Update Report to the UNFCCC Project which is being implemented by the NCCO. The sessions, included consultation with stakeholders and personnel within a sector.

A subsequent meeting was held on Friday, March 8, 2019 at the NEMO conference room in Belmopan to build Belize’s capacity and increase the country’s knowledge about climate change to build resilience.
Dr. Arnoldo Bezamilla Morlot and Dr. Abel Centella from INSMET, Cuba shared the climate models they developed for the fisheries, water, coastal zone and agriculture sectors based on the previous planning sessions. The meeting concluded with review, feedback and discussion of the outputs of the climate modelling exercise.


4th National Communication Workshop

On February 20, 2019, a “National Communication Partnership Workshop” facilitated by Dr. Eduardo Planos, Director for Cuba’s 3rd National Communication, from INSMET and Dr. Abel Centella, Director of INSMET, was held at the George Price Center for Peace and Development in Belmopan City.
The workshop was intended to build the capacity of technical officers from the various relevant Government Ministries and Departments in the area of coastal zone and sea level by focusing on measurement tools, statistical analysis and modelling methods, and community engagement. The workshop was carried out as part of the Fourth National Communication and First Biennial Update Report Project to the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which is being implemented by the National Climate Change Office (NCCO) to supplement existing national activities geared towards building Belize’s Climate Resilience.

The workshop was attended by 14 representatives from Institutions including the National Meteorology Service, National Climate Change Office, CCCCC, Ministry of Housing and Urban Development, Ministry of Public Works, National Emergency Management Organization (NEMO), Fisheries Department and National Hydrological Service (NHS).


Coastal Zone, Sea Level Rise, and Related Processes Capacity Building Workshop

Dr. Marcelino Hernández Gonzalez, Cuban Coastal Zone Expert in session

The four-day capacity building “Coastal Zone, Sea Level Rise, and Related Processes” workshop facilitated by Dr. Marcelino Hernández Gonzalez, Cuban Coastal Zone Expert, was held during the period of February 11 – 14 , 2019, at the Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute’s Conference Room in Belize City. It was made possible through the collaboration of the Centre, NCCO, UNDP and Cuba’s Institute for Marine Sciences (ICIMAR). The purpose of the workshop was to build the capacity of technical officers from the various relevant Government Ministries and Departments on the area of coastal zone and sea level by focusing on measurement tools, statistical analysis and modelling methods, and community engagement. The workshop was carried out as part of the Fourth National Communication and First Biennial Update Report Project to the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which is being implemented by the National Climate Change Office (NCCO) to supplement existing national activities geared towards building Belize Climate Resilience.

Participants with their certificates

For more information about the training workshops, contact: Mr. Ahnivar Peralta at aperalta@caribbeanclimate.bz.



Vacancy – Haiti Institutional Strengthening – National Coordinator

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received financing from Green Climate Fund (GCF), toward the cost of the project titled “Institutional Strengthening and Preparatory Support for the Republic of Haiti” and intends to apply part of the proceeds towards the contracting of a National GCF Coordinator. The CCCCC now invites eligible Consultants to express their  interest in providing the Services.

Peruse the following official document:

Terms of Reference for National GCF Coordinator – Haiti

All suitably qualified persons are invited to submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) covering the points outlined in the TOR and accompanied by the following application documents:

  1. Letter of motivation outlining motivation and how your experience, skills, qualifications and professional networks fit with the required job description.
  2. Curriculum vitae or Résumé with full details of experience, achievements, qualifications and names
  3. Contact details of three (3) references 

The deadline for the submission of EOI’s is on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6), Friday 15 March 2019.

Vacancy – Belize Readiness 2 – National Coordinator and Technical Officer

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received financing from Green Climate Fund (GCF), toward the cost of the project titled “Belize GCF Readiness 2(Building Capacity for Direct Access to Climate Finance)” and intends to apply part of the proceeds towards the contracting of a (1) National GCF Coordinator and (2) a Technical Officer.  The CCCCC now invites eligible Consultants to express their  interest in providing the Services. 

Download the folders for the following:

All suitably qualified persons are invited to submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) covering the points outlined in the TOR and accompanied by the following application documents:

  1. Letter of motivation outlining motivation and how your experience, skills, qualifications and professional networks fit with the required job description.
  2. Curriculum vitae or Résumé with full details of experience, achievements, qualifications and names
  3. Contact details of three (3) references 

The deadline for the submission of EOI’s is on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6), Friday 15 March 2019.

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST- DEVELOPMENT FINANCE CORPORATION (DFC): CONSULTANCY TO STRENGTHEN CAPACITY IN DUE DILIGENCE FOR CLIMATE RISK ASSESSMENT OF SUB PROJECTS.

The Development Finance Corporation (DFC) has embarked a bold Strategic Development Plan – “Strategy 2021: Building resilience against Climate Change and Economic Volatility”.  A strategic priority of the plan is building resilience to the effects of climate change, and to ensure that consideration of climate change risks is reflected throughout DFC’s lending operations. Within this context, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) approved a technical assistance grant to integrate appropriate climate risk assessment provisions into DFC’s investment policies and procedures, and to strengthen staff skills in order to improve the Corporation’s overall due diligence process in its credit function to ensure the sustainability of its operations.

DFC now wishes to procure consultancy services to strengthen its capacity in due diligence for climate risk assessment of financed sub projects (credit lines). The overall objective of the technical assistance is to improve the institutional capacity of DFC to assess and manage climate risks in its credit delivery and administration processes.  The detailed Terms of Reference for this consultancy can be viewed on the DFC’s Website at www.dfcbelize.org

DFC now invites interested eligible individual consultants (or groups) to submit Expressions of Interest for the provision of these consultancy services.  Consultants must be from member countries of CDB.  The attention of interested Consultants is drawn to paragraph 1.9 of CDB’s Guidelines for the Selection and Engagement of Consultants (2011), setting forth CDB’s policy on conflict of interest.  Consultants will be selected in accordance with CDB’s procurement guidelines.

Principal qualifications and experience required to conduct the assignment include:

The following requisite qualifications and experience are required:

  • master’s degree qualifications in Climate Risk Assessment, Environmental/ Disaster Risk Assessment or a related field;
  • a minimum of 5 years working experience in the areas of climate vulnerability and risk assessments; and
  • Experience with training adults for professional development;
  • Experience in the implementation of similar projects would be an asset. Specific experience in the Caribbean context is desirable; and
  • Resources with excellent written and verbal communication skills.

All information must be submitted in English.   Expressions of interest must be delivered in a sealed envelope to the DFC Headquarters at the address listed below no later than 16:00 hours on March 1, 2019.  Sealed envelopes containing the submission should include the name and address of the applicant or applicants and should be clearly marked “EXPRESSION OF INTEREST– CONSULTANCY TO STRENGTHEN DFC CAPACITY IN DUE DILIGENCE FOR CLIMATE RISK ASSESSMENT OF SUB PROJECTS.

DFC reserves the right to accept or reject late applications or to cancel the present invitation partially or in its entirety.  The DFC will not defray any costs incurred by any applicant in the preparation and submission of Expressions of Interest.    

Applicants will be advised in due course of the results of their application.

Address:
The Chief Strategist/ Climate Champion.
Development Finance Corporation
Bliss Parade
P. O Box 40
City of Belmopan
Cayo District
Belize, C. A.
Tel: 1 (501) 822 – 2235/60

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: Feasibility Study of the Investment Proposal – Arundo donax Renewable Bio-mass Fuel for Belize, Contract#07/2019/GCF/Belize/CCCCC

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received funds from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) for the purpose of implementing the project “Arundo Donax Renewable Bio-Mass Fuel for Belize” and intends to apply a part of the proceeds towards payments for the Contract “Feasibility Study of the Investment Proposal – Arundo donax Renewable Bio-mass Fuel for Belize”.   Peruse the following official documents:

The CCCCC now invites consultants to submit proposals to provide services for the same.   Deadline for the submission of proposals on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6), Friday 1 March 2019

Request for Proposals: Background Study to Inform the Preparation of a Simplified Approval Process (SAP) Funding Proposal – Dominica

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC)  has receivedfinancing from the United States Agency for International Development/Eastern and Southern Caribbean’s (USAID/ESC) for implementation of the project Climate Change Adaptation Program (USAID- CCAP) and it intends to apply part of the proceeds to payments under a Contract for the “Background Study to Inform the Preparation of a Simplified Approval Process (SAP) Funding Proposal – Dominica”.

Peruse the official Request for Proposals and Terms of Reference.

The CCCCC now invites consultants to submit proposals to provide services for the same. 

Deadline for the submission of proposals on or before 2:00 p.m. (GMT- 6) Friday, February 22, 2019.

Request for Expressions of Interest – National Coordinator, WSRN S-Barbados

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is inviting Expressions of Interest from Individual Consultants for the position of National Project Coordinator. This is a long term consultancy to support the implementation of the “Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados (WSRN S-Barbados) Project”.  

Peruse the official Request for Expressions of Interest and its accompanying Terms of Reference.

Expressions of interest must be delivered electronically by 10:00 am Belize time (GMT-6) on Monday February 4th 2019 to the email address mnestor@caribbeanclimate.bzThe Request for Expressions of Interest and related Terms of Reference could be accessed here. 

Dr Leonard Nurse, Chairman of the Board and Mr Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) attended the 99th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in their personal capacities. Other participants from the Caribbean at the meeting held in Phoenix, Arizona, USA from 6 to 10 January 2019 included Dr David Farrell, Principal of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), Mr Glendell de Souza, Deputy Coordinating Director of the Caribbean Meteorological Organization (CMO) and representatives of the national Meteorological Services of the Antigua and Barbuda, Guyana and Suriname.

There were several presentations by scientists from the CIMH. Shawn Boyce presented on “Impact-Based Forecasting and Assessment in the Caribbean”.  Lawrence Pologne delivered a presentation on “The Potential, Viability and Co-benefits of Developing Wind Energy to Mitigate Climate Change in the Caribbean” based on his University of the West Indies (UWI), Cave Hill doctoral thesis. Branden Spooner, an Intern at CIMH, presented on “Using Virtual Reality Technology as a Tool in Disaster Risk Reduction”.

There were several presentations of interest to the region. Kristie Ebi delivered on “Building Resilience of Health Systems in Pacific Island Least Developed Countries”. She also worked with Cory Morin of the University of Washington who delivered a presentation on, “Use of Seasonal Climate Forecasts to Develop an Early-Warning System for Dengue Fever Risk in Central America and the Caribbean”. They expressed an interest with collaborating with the CCCCC in developing this warning system.

The CIMH, and the national Meteorological Services of Belize and Jamaica were used in Catherine Vaughan’s, “Evaluation of Regional Climate Services: Learning from Seasonal Scale Examples across the Americas”. She is working out of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Colombia University.

Belize may find the presentation by Jorge Tamayo of the State Meteorological Agency, Spain, on “New Projects on Iberoamerican Meteorological Cooperation” of special interest. One project is on the development of a lightening detection network for Central America. They are also collaborating with the Regional Committee of Hydrological Services (CRRH) and the Central American Integration System (SICA) on a meeting in 2019 on the delivery of climate services.

In an interesting session on Communicating Climate Change, Mike Nelson of KMGH-TV in Denver Colorado, presented on “Communicating Climate Change – Be the Expert in the Living Room”, and Hank Jenkins-Smith of the University of Oklahoma delivered a presentation on “Stability and Instability in Individual Beliefs about Climate Change”. Jenkins-Smith noted that based on polling trends, conservatives were more likely to change their beliefs on climate change while liberals were more likely to retain their opinions on climate change.

In a session on Climate Extremes in the Tropical Americas: Past, Present and Future, Derek Thompson of Louisiana State University (LSU) presented on “Spatiotemporal Patterns and Recurrence Intervals of Tropical Cyclone Strikes for the Caribbean Islands from 1901 to 2017”, and Prashant Sardeshmukh, CIRES presented on “Can We Trust Model Projections of Changes in Climate Extremes over the Tropical Americas?”. He noted that dynamics played a more important role than atmospheric temperature in explaining extreme weather events. Current climate models were not capturing this aspect accurately and more work was required in this area. Kristine DeLong of LSU presented her work on “Last Interglacial Sea Surface Temperature Variability in the Tropical Atlantic Warm Pool: A Comparison of Model and Coral-Based Reconstructions”, which focused mainly on paleoclimatic reconstructions based on coral samples in the Caribbean. She noted the importance of collaboration with Caribbean institutions.

The 100th AMS Meeting will be held in Boson, Massachusetts from 12 to 16 January 2020. Caribbean meteorologists, hydrologists and climate change experts are encouraged to attend these meetings to be appraised of the most recent research on these subjects.

CARICOM Champions Science at COP 24 – Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre and Climate Change Negotiator

The Member States of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) were among a large group of countries at COP 24 insisting that the global response to climate change be driven by science.

During 2018 the CARICOM Member States tried to include the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C as an agenda item at COP 24. However, they were unable to do so. At COP 24 they used two approaches to highlight the importance of the Special Report to the process. In the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA) under the agenda item on Research and Systematic Observations (RSO), they proposed a paragraph welcoming the Special Report. Led by Ms Cheryl Jeffers of St Kitts and Nevis, speaking on behalf of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS), the group also tried to insert paragraphs highlighting key messages from the 2018 State of the Climate presented by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the work of a Task Force of Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). Although these were supported by most of the countries present, including the African Group, the Least Developed Countries Group (LDCs), the Independent Association of Latin America and the Caribbean (AILAC) and the European Union (EU), it was opposed by Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Russia and the United States. As a result, when the SBSTA session ended, there were no agreed conclusions on this issue and discussions will resume at the next session in May 2019.

Undeterred, CARICOM continued to press the case the following week and were able to get reference to the IPCC Special Report in the main COP decision. It invited countries to consider the information contained in the report when they addressed relevant issues. In addition, SBSTA will discuss the contents of the report in May. IPCC assessments and reports will also be used to inform the global stocktake to be undertaken in 2023 to assess the implementation of the Paris Agreement and inform subsequent countries nationally determined contributions (NDCs).

In the decision adopting the Paris Agreement in 2015, the IPCC was requested to prepare this special report. Leonard Nurse, UWI (Barbados); Felicia Whyte, Kimberly Stephenson, Tannecia Stephenson and Michael Taylor, UWI (Jamaica); and Adelle Thomas of the University of the Bahamas contributed to the preparation of the report. During 2018 as the report was circulated for comments, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre with support from Climate Analytics and Charles and Associates organized regional workshops with CARICOM national IPCC and UNFCCC Focal Points to review the report and provide comments on its contents.

The IPCC will produce two additional special reports in 2019, and CARICOM scientists will once again play an important role in their preparation. Adrian Spence, International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (Jamaica); Kenel Delusca, Institute of Science, Technology and Advanced Studies of Haiti; and Noureddin Benkeblia and Donovan Campbell, UWI (Jamaica) will be contributing authors to the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land. For the IPCC Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere on a Changing Climate, Michael Sutherland, UWI (Trinidad and Tobago) has been selected to assist in preparing the report.

Flickr Photos

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