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AMS 100 by Carlos Fuller, International and Regional Liaison Officer, CCCCC

The 100th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) was held in Boston, Massachusetts from 12 to 16 January 2020.The theme was “The AMS Past, Present and Future: Linking Information to Knowledge to Society (LINKS)”.

The AMS is an excellent forum for the exchange of the latest developments and research in the fields of weather, water and climate, including climate change. At the Presidential Forum, Gina McCarthy, the Administrator of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 2013 to 2017 noted that although the US government had initiated the process to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, 25 States had committed to fulfill the government’s commitments in its NDC. She noted that these 25 States account for 55% of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions and collectively are the 3rd largest economy in the world.

Professor Petteri Tallas, Secretary General of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) spoke on the reforms underway at the WMO to support the delivery of services in a changing climate. WMO’s State of the Climate Report at COP 25 noted that concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere were now at an unprecedented level. The last five years and the last decade were the warmest ever recorded. As the world transitioned to a low carbon and climate smart development pathway, more support from the meteorological community would be required to support both adaptation and mitigation activities.

There were several sessions of relevance to the Caribbean. In When Can We Talk about the Successes? Perspectives on the Impacts of Hurricane Dorian to Buildings and Infrastructure in the Bahamas the presenter noted that while engineering surveys identified the reasons buildings failed, they could not show why adjacent buildings which were even more exposed survived. It was important to use these structures as examples to design and construct hurricane resistant buildings. Others presentations included Impacts of Climate Information on Coffee Forms in Jamaica, Future Climate Projections in the French West Indies: Regional Climate, Tropical Cyclones and Storm Waves, The Role of Convection on the Decreasing Caribbean Precipitation during a Regional, Warming Sea Surface Temperature Period: 1982-2017, and Interannual Variability of the Early and Late Rainy Seasons in the Caribbean

Several members of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) made oral and poster presentations: Shanice Whitehall, Monitoring the Saharan Air layer over the Caribbean using Satellite Imagery, Darlene Field, Using Aerosol Optical Depth to Enhance Prediction of Solar PV Performance in Tropical Climates: Case Study – Barbados, Ashford Reyes, The Predictability of Saharan Dust Incursions over the Eastern Caribbean, Branden Spooner, Development of Interactive Visual Environment for Hydrometeorological Visualization and Analysis, Theodore Allen, The Hurricane Heat Trail Effect on Caribbean Heat Waves, and Lawrence Pologne, The Variability of Wind Resource in the Caribbean. Arlene Laing, Coordinating Director of the Caribbean Meteorological Organization presented on Contributions of Women in the English-speaking Caribbean to Tropical Meteorology Operations, Education Research and Applications.

The Caribbean was well represented at the meeting. Dr David Farrell, Principal of the CIMH was present as well as Glendell de Souza of the CMO and the Directors of the Meteorological Services of the Bahamas, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, and Suriname. Dr Leonard Nurse the former Chairman of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre and Carlos Fuller, the International a d Regional liaison officer at the Centre also attended.

The climate change community in the Caribbean should consider attending these annual AMS meetings. One of the conferences which comprise the meeting is the Conference on Climate Variability and Change. Several sessions were devoted to the media and weather presenters on conveying climate change information. Marshal Shepherd formerly of NASA and now at the University of Georgia presented on Attributing Extreme Weather Events to Climate Change. Another session was devoted to Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Coastal Urban Tropical Environments where a presentation should have been made on Climate-Resilient Caribbean Cities: the Grenada Case. There were other sessions devoted to Greenhouse Gases. These sessions and presentations can expose Caribbean climate change policymakers, negotiators and implementers with the state of the science.

Request for Expressions of Interest – Consultant to Develop a Communication Strategy, Education and Promotional Materials

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received funds from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) for the purpose of implementing the project “Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados (WSRN S-Barbados)” and intends to apply a part of the proceeds towards payments for the Contract “Consultant to Develop a Communication Strategy, Education and Promotional Materials”.

Peruse the official Request for Expression of Interest and its associated Terms of Reference.

The CCCCC now invites interested consultants to submit Expression of Interest (EOI)  for this consultancy.

The deadline for submission is on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6),  Friday 31 January 2020

Extended Deadline – Vacancy – Procurement Officer, CCCCC

A vacancy exists at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre for a PROCUREMENT OFFICER

Contract terms of reference (TOR)

Country Belize
Project Name Intra-ACP GCCA+ Programme: Enhancing Climate Resilience in CARIFORUM Countries
Contract Title Procurement Officer (PO)
Contract Type Fixed Price – Individual Contracts
Expected Duration of the Services 24 months
Duration of Contract 24 months in the first instance (Contract renewal is subject to the availability of funds and successful performance evaluation)
Estimated start time: February 2020
Duty Station Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) Office, in Belmopan, Belize with travel to Member States as necessary
Deadline for Submission 2:00pm (Belize time), Monday, 20th January, 2020

Peruse the official Terms of Reference.

Applications should be clearly identified as – Recruitment of Procurement Officer – EU Intra-ACP GCCA: Enhancing Climate Resilience in CARIFORUM Countries – Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and be submitted as one PDF file (in the order listed above) via email to:

Ms. Ethlyn Valladares
Human Resource Administrator
Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC)
Lawrence Nicholas Building, Ring Road
Belmopan City, Belize, C.A.
Phone: + (501) 822-1094 or 1104  
hr@caribbeanclimate.bz

Extended Deadline – Vacancy – Procurement Officer, CCCCC

A vacancy exists at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre for a PROCUREMENT OFFICER

Contract terms of reference (TOR)

Country Belize
Project Name Intra-ACP GCCA+ Programme: Enhancing Climate Resilience in CARIFORUM Countries
Contract Title Procurement Officer (PO)
Contract Type Fixed Price – Individual Contracts
Expected Duration of the Services 24 months
Duration of Contract 24 months in the first instance (Contract renewal is subject to the availability of funds and successful performance evaluation)
Estimated start time: February 2020
Duty Station Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) Office, in Belmopan, Belize with travel to Member States as necessary
Deadline for Submission 2:00pm (Belize time), Monday 20th January 2020

Peruse the official Terms of Reference.

Applications should be clearly identified as – Recruitment of Procurement Officer – EU Intra-ACP GCCA: Enhancing Climate Resilience in CARIFORUM Countries – Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) and be submitted as one PDF file (in the order listed above) via email to:

Ms. Ethlyn Valladares
Human Resource Administrator
Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC)
Lawrence Nicholas Building, Ring Road
Belmopan City, Belize, C.A.
Phone: + (501) 822-1094 or 1104  
hr@caribbeanclimate.bz

COP25 – CANARI’s SDGs Champion says clean energy essential to lifting thousands out of poverty

By Desmond Brown
MADRID – The lack of access to affordable, reliable electricity is a widespread problem across the Caribbean with thousands of rural homes requiring urgent attention to prevent the region for sinking further into poverty.

Dessima Williams, SDGs Champion at the Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI), said providing clean power to these households would transform the lives of people and put a dent in energy poverty in the Caribbean.

“Energy is very expensive in the Caribbean as part of our expenditure for livelihood, and therefore, not everybody could afford it,” Williams told Caribbean News Service (CNS) on the sidelines of the United Nations Climate Conference (COP25), being held here.

“I know people in Grenada, where I’m from, who during the month, when the tank of [cooking] gas is finished, they can’t buy more gas until they get paid again. That’s the scale of energy poverty in our region.”

Energy poverty – lack of access to electricity – has been described as the ultimate economic hindrance, as it prevents people from participating in the modern economy.

“What energy poverty does is that it perpetuates general poverty. If you can’t find electricity for a quality of life, if you can’t find gas for cooking, those impact children’s access to education, [put a] strain and stress on women or men to find food,” Williams explained.

“It also raises the cost for everybody, even the cost of fuel to catch fish, and therefore raises the price of fish in the Caribbean or agricultural products for the farmers.

“So, it is really important that we have affordable, accessible, clean energy available to all – both from the point of view of reducing and eliminating energy poverty, but also for the wider issue of poverty eradication,” Williams added.

Scaling up renewable energy initiatives

Williams said in order to achieve the goal of affordable, clean energy for all, renewable energy initiatives have to be scaled up.

She cited what’s happening in the Dominican Republic, where there’s an 80 per cent transformation from fossil fuels to more renewables.

“That should be the case in every island in the shortest possible time. We also need to make sure that the energy transition or transformation reaches the poorest of the poor, and in that sense, the decentralization of energy supply, whether it occurs through solar energy, batteries and simple ways that the average person could find it affordable,” Williams said.

“I know that solar energy for most households in Grenada, it’s not affordable. It’s come down significantly and it’s still maybe two per cent of our energy grid, but I think it needs to be faster and more affordable, so that it becomes more sustainable and it builds up the resilience of communities and households to function, particularly in times of hurricane crises and in normal times, that it leads to a rapid application of sustainable practices that could eradicate poverty.

“In some countries, like my own, our poverty is in the double digits and the Sustainable Development Goals make it imperative that we act,” Williams added.

In September, the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) signalled their commitment to strengthen cooperation aimed at advancing renewable energy in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Landlocked Developing Countries (LLDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

The two organisations noted that small island developing states are at risk of being left behind and energy gaps must be closed and SIDS supported in transitioning to more sustainable and renewable energy sources by 2030, adding that countries cannot achieve this alone.

“The energy transformation brings significant opportunity to developed and developing countries alike,” said IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera.

“Renewables are not only our most effective response to rising emissions, but they are also an engine of low-carbon development, supporting energy access, energy security and climate resilience in the world’s most vulnerable countries.”

Ending energy poverty in vulnerable countries and ensuring that no country or person is left behind is critical to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

Meanwhile, since the launch of IRENA’s SIDS Lighthouses Initiative (LHI), the renewable energy uptake in SIDS has been impressive.

The initial LHI targets for 2020 in terms of installed capacity (100 megawatts of solar PV, 20 megawatts of wind power) and mobilised funding (US$ 500 million) have been met and exceeded three years ahead of schedule.

SIDS Lighthouse Programme Officer Arieta Gonelevue Rakai told CNS the Caribbean SIDS are being assisted at different levels, including capacity building on renewable energy statistics and energy target setting.

“At the national level, we’re assisting some of the SIDS, for example Antigua and Barbuda,” Gonelevue Rakai told CNS.

“We are going to start a feasible study on electrifying their transport sector. This is going to start early next year.

“We hope that out of this study we will have a roadmap that will highlight the long-term plans on how to go about achieving the 100 per cent energy target,” she added.

COP25: Caribbean airports’ close proximity to coastline a big concern as sea levels rise

By Desmond Brown

MADRID – In September 2017, Dominica’s Douglas Charles Airport was severely damaged by flooding when Hurricane Maria hit the island with 160-mile-per-hour winds.

Rains brought by the hurricane also triggered landslides, and washed away bridges, roads and crops.

Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management Coordinator at the Organisations of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) Crispin d’Auvergne says severe weather events like hurricanes Irma and Maria, serve as a reminder of the vulnerability of airports and seaports in the Caribbean.

“Hurricane Maria severely affected the air and seaports in Dominica. Anguilla was similarly impacted, as was St. Maarten, which has observer status at the OECS. So, they are being affected, seriously,” d’Auvergne said.

“Both air and seaports are critical for tourism, both in terms of cruise and stayover visitors.

“So, to the extent that our economies rely on air and seaports . . . then it’s important that we build resilience into those systems,” added d’Auvergne, who spoke with Caribbean News Service (CNS) on the sidelines of the United Nations Climate Conference (COP25), underway here until Dec. 13.

Recent United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) studies on seaports and airports in Jamaica and Saint Lucia, show the economic effect of catastrophic climate events and what can be done to mitigate them.

In the studies, detailed assessments of the vulnerability of the islands’ transportation assets were carried out to improve knowledge and understanding at the national level; and to test new approaches in order to develop an appropriate methodology for assessing climate-related impacts on coastal transportation in other Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Given the importance of airports and seaports and their land interconnections to tourism and the movement of goods, the vulnerability of their infrastructure and operations to climate variability and change is a most important factor for consideration, the studies note.

“Air and seaports are really key nodes in our supply system because, as an example, 90 per cent of our food and other supplies come by sea,” d’Auvergne said.

Urgent action needed

UNCTAD said SIDS already face several transport-related challenges as well as natural hazards and are particularly exposed due to their climate, geographical and topographical features as well as their critical reliance on coastal transport infrastructure, in particular seaports and airports.

According to d’Auvergne, climate-related extreme events affecting coastal transport infrastructure are likely to exacerbate existing challenges, making effective adaptation action an urgent imperative.

“Sea level rise is already happening and we’re already experiencing flooding that comes with the more intense rainfall that we see during hurricanes,” he said.

Resilience, not only in terms of structures, must be an important factor in all plans going forward, d’Auvergne said.

“In terms of operations for example, you would need to look at the actual terminals – how resilient they are in terms of water supply like in drought periods, because we can expect more intense droughts, more intense hurricanes. How quickly can they resume operations and how can they maintain operations during a drought?

“You also have to look at things like the road system that feeds to your ports. How robust are they? Are there bridges connecting them that will go down with the first hurricane or first heavy rain and flooding?

“When it comes to the airports themselves, it might mean gradually over time, looking at a phased approach to look at elevating your control towers. Gradually putting in costal armoring to prevent topping of waves,” d’Auvergne said.

For countries planning to expand or renovate their airport, d’Auvergne said they should tart to put in some of those measures that can help to gradually increase their resilience.

“Your next upgrade should have a climate component in it so that you don’t lose your assists in the next hurricane that comes,” he said.

Many Caribbean airports tend to be located close to coastal areas – many below 33 metres – making them vulnerable to rising sea levels.

The lowest airport runway in the Caribbean is at the Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay, Jamaica, which sits only four metres above sea level.
Trotz: ‘We can’t help where they are at this point’

The location of the airports in the Caribbean is a reality these countries have to live with, said Dr. Ulric Trotz, Deputy Director at Science Advisory at the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC).

“Our ports and airports are in very vulnerable areas. We can’t help where they are at this point in time, there’s been tremendous investment,” he told CNS.

“What we could do is to try and understand what the impacts of higher seas would be and try to put in protection. We have an example in Palisadoes in Jamaica [Norman Manley International], if you look at what has been done over the last few years, it’s precisely what we need to look at doing at other exposed airports throughout the Caribbean.”

Dr. Trotz suggests countries study what the inundation would be like, using different scenarios, such as a category one hurricane, a category two hurricane, or high tides.

He said this would give countries an idea of the scope of exposure, and on that basis, they could then look at how to re-engineer the actual location to protect the airports.
Limited financial resources

While this remedy could give countries up to 90 per cent protection, Dr. Trotz acknowledged that it’s easier said than done, given the limited financial resources available to countries in the Caribbean.

“But one of the problems of course – it’s easy sitting here talking about it – is getting the resources to do it,” he said.

“If we look at my country, Guyana, forget the airport, we’re on the coast six feet below sea level. We’re there basically, I think, as a result of our colonialization by the Dutch who had all the technology to put up sea walls, etc.

“We don’t have the resources to deal with the new reality of rising sea level and the extreme weather events that we experience, so we get frequent flooding. The Dutch on the other hand, in Amsterdam, they put up a flood defense system for a one-in-a-thousand-year event, which shows that globally we have the know-how to deal with our problems.

“The problem is we don’t have the resources. We don’t even have the resources to deal with a yearly flooding event much less a one-in-a-thousand-year event. It needs a lot of investment. It needs a lot of cooperation from some of our developed country partners. But I’m hopeful that we’ll get the resources to do just what is needed to be done,” Dr. Trotz added.

COP 25 – How Antigua and Barbuda is ‘transitioning from old ways to green ways’ with renewable energy

By Desmond Brown

MADRID – At approximately 37 cents U.S. per kilowatt-hour (kWh), Antigua and Barbuda’s electricity rates are among the highest in the Caribbean. The regional average is 33 cents USD/kWh.

Like many island nations, Antigua and Barbuda is almost entirely reliant on imported fossil fuels, leaving it vulnerable to global oil price fluctuations that directly impact the cost of electricity.

Minister of Health and the Environment Molwyn Joseph said the high electricity rates have implications for everyone, but particularly the disposable income of the low-income sector of the population.

To change this, he said Antigua and Barbuda “has an outlook, of transitioning from old ways to green ways.”

“We were fortunate in Antigua and Barbuda when we were able to get the entire nation to embrace the elimination of single-use plastic bags. We take a step further, of eliminating the Styrofoam containers,” Joseph told Caribbean News Service (CNS) on Saturday.

“This message was done with an integration about transitioning from fossil fuels to renewable energy. So, we were able to create an atmosphere in Antigua and Barbuda where we are looking at the way we do things and the importance of transitioning into the more sustainable type of development.”

In 2018, Antigua and Barbuda signed a US$15 million renewable energy deal with the French-based global renewable energy solutions provider, Vergnet Group, which will see the country becoming equipped with high tech wind hybrid and wind only interactive power grids.

Joseph, who is leading Antigua and Barbuda’s delegation to the United Nations Climate Conference (COP 25) in Madrid, said on Saturday that the transition to renewable energy would see immediate benefits, so that people could redirect their resources with the saving that they make from energy, into education and taking care of their health.

He said there are also other very important spinoffs for the country.

“For instance, in the area of natural disasters, primarily hurricanes, we have suffered tremendously from resilience, how we bounce back after a disaster. With the programme of quick transitioning as well as building more resilient infrastructure, we are hoping that after a storm, our services can be resumed almost immediately – no more than 48 hours,” Joseph told CNS.

“Our schools, our clinics, our hospital and all the other government services could be resumed immediately.”

While noting that Antigua and Barbuda does not have surface water and suffers from severe droughts, Joseph said reverse osmosis is now “the order of the day” for the country.

The development of the wind and solar energy sectors becomes even more crucial, as the country plans for the operation of these reverse osmosis plants after the passage of a storm.

“The wind energy installation is geared directly toward the reverse osmosis plants, so that during a storm, if the electrical grid fails, we have the backup with the wind energy, so that water supply will not be interrupted at all, or if it is, for a very short period of time,” Joseph said.

Genevieve Renaud-Byrne is a Project Coordinator at the Antigua Department of Environment, focusing on the Sustainable Pathways Protected Area and Renewable Energy Project.

She said Antigua and Barbuda produced most of its emissions from the electricity sector, specifically the large diesel generators used in the generation process.

“By removing those generators and putting in renewable energy, we’re going to reduce our emissions a lot,” Renaud-Byrne told CNS.

Like Joseph, Renaud-Byrne also spoke about the high cost of electricity, which she said takes up too much of a percentage of the regular household income

She said the current monopoly by the Antigua Public Utilities Authority is partly to blame.

“What we’d like to see with renewable energy is to diversify the energy mix and provide other opportunities to both the regular homeowner and the private sector to start making their own power and reducing their own household electricity bill,” Renaud-Byrne said.

Under its Sustainable Pathways Protected Area and Renewable Energy Project, Antigua and Barbuda is currently in the process of installing 15 small wind turbines to the Crabbs reverse osmosis seawater desalination plant and Sir Vivian Richard Stadium.

This power will be utilized to ensure the reverse osmosis plant can continue to function even in the event of an electrical grid failure.

The turbines being utilized are Vergnet 275kW hurricane resistant wind turbines. They reach a maximum height of 70 meters (at the tip of the blades). Each turbine has been delivered with noise reduction technology to ensure minimal impact on local homeowners, land users, and wildlife.

Even when generating at full capacity, the turbines will be no louder than an average conversation at 250 meters.

Meanwhile, in September, the UAE-Caribbean Renewable Energy Fund, UAE-CREF, announced a partnership to restore power to Barbuda following the near-total destruction of the island when Hurricane Irma struck in September 2017.

Other partners include the Government of Antigua and Barbuda’s Ministry of Public Utilities, Civil Aviation, Transport and Energy, the CARICOM Development Fund (CDF) and the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, NZMFAT.

The agreement will see the disbursement of US$5.7 million from the UAE to support Antigua and Barbuda through the largest renewable energy initiative of its kind in the Caribbean region.
For Caribbean countries, Renaud-Byrne said everyone needs to be on the same page when it comes to renewable energy.

“I think it’s very well understood now that we cannot continue to emit greenhouse gasses like we currently are. So, we all need to get on the same page, get excited about renewable energy and then come up with a pathway as to how to implement renewable energy into the mix,” she said.

COP25 – ‘We are dying’: Island youth demand action from rich countries to meet scale of climate emergency

By Desmond Brown

MADRID – Young people from the Caribbean and the Pacific on Friday demanded that major emitters and rich countries do more to meet the scale of the climate emergency, saying people are dying because of climate change.

Four young people from Aruba, Grenada, Haiti and Samoa made the call for action during an Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) news conference at the COP25 climate talks in Madrid.

“Climate change is a serious matter, it’s not a laughing matter. We need to take action, we need to act now because people are dying, we are dying,” said Jimmy Fénelon, the National Coordinator of Caribbean Youth Environmental Network (CYEN) in Haiti.

“I’ve had typhoid. I’ve had malaria. My grandmother died from cholera. I know what I’m talking about.”

Fénelon said the Small Island Developing States (SIDS) all share the same issues, and are having the same problems.

“Maybe many of you heard about Haiti. We are one of the poorest countries … and we are facing climate change,” he said.

“I am facing climate change, I am living it, I can talk about it. I am facing rising [sea] levels. I am facing deadly hurricanes … We need to act.”

For Renae Baptiste, Vice President for the CYEN Grenada chapter, climate change is not a concept or a theory. Instead, she said it is the new reality for the people of her island nation.

She believes the present generation is the last that can help end climate change.

“Climate change is affecting our lives, our coastal communities, our ecosystems and even our economies,” Baptiste said.

“We are experiencing stronger storms, rising sea levels, ocean acidification, and these are escalating, posing even greater threats and risks to our lives.

“Step up, do your part, no matter the action you’re doing, in the end it all adds up and has a great impact,” Baptiste added.

Miguel van der Velden, also with CYEN in Aruba, said like other countries in the Caribbean, his island is heavily dependent on tourism.

But he said in recent times, Aruba has been experiencing severe drought and is frequently affected by dangerous hurricanes.

“These things are not games. They’re getting worse. They’re affecting millions of people around the world,” said van der Velden.

“I come here not because I’m scared. I’m scared, but I come here because I have hope that we can work together. We don’t have anything to lose if we work together. If anything, we can create a much more beautiful world.

“On Aruba, we say come to our beautiful island; to live a good life. All of our islands are beautiful islands and we all want to live a good life.”

Brianna Fruean, with 350 Samoa and the Pacific Climate Warriors, said: “World leaders need to know that people like me are watching them. The text we put down today on paper at COP is what our future will look like.”

Meanwhile, Ambassador Janine Felson, Deputy Permanent Representative of Belize to the United Nations and AOSIS deputy chair, assured the youth they are not alone in their quest.

“AOSIS stands in solidarity with you. We fully affirm your just demand for a prosperous future in your homelands and we are fighting to ensure that by holding developed countries and ourselves accountable, we can sustain the course for a 1.5° world,” Felson said.

“Ultimately, it doesn’t matter what label you put on us, what matters is that we represent the very people I have next to me, we represent the youth.”

Felson also highlighted island leadership inside and outside the UN Climate process and the need to work with young people to build the political pressure necessary for change.

“We’ve also resolved to move to 100 per cent renewable energy by 2030,” she said.

“We’re looking to build climate resilient infrastructure. We’re looking at nature-based solutions. We’re exploring every avenue possible. Because we do not want to leave our homes, we don’t want to put our children in a position where they will have to leave their homes.”

AOSIS consists of 45 island countries who ban together and have been a consistent voice for climate action.

AOSIS has been calling for increased emissions reductions at COP25, as well as action to compensate small island nations and other vulnerable countries for the loss and damage they are already experiencing from climate impacts.

Request for Expressions of Interest – Consultant to Develop Revolving Adaptation Fund Facility (RAFF) Charter and Operations Manual

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received funds from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) for the purpose of implementing the project “Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados (WSRN S-Barbados)” and intends to apply a part of the proceeds towards payments for the Contract “Consultant to Develop Revolving Adaptation Fund Facility (RAFF) Charter and Operations Manual”.

 Peruse the official Request for Expression of Interest and it’s accompanying Terms of Reference.

The CCCCC now invites interested consultants to submit Expression of Interest (EOI)  for this consultancy.

The deadline for submission is on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6) on Friday, 27 December,  2019.

Vacancy – Project Development Specialist, Grenada

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) has received financing from Green Climate Fund (GCF), toward the cost of the project titled “Strengthening Institutional and Implementation Capacity for Delivery of Climate Change Investment Projects: Grenada” and intends to apply part of the proceeds towards the contracting of a Project Development Specialist for the Environment Division which falls within the Ministry of Climate Resilience, Government of Grenada.

Peruse the official Request for Expressions of Interest and its accompanying Terms of Reference.

The deadline for the submission of EOI’s is on or before 2:00pm (GMT-6) on Friday, December 27, 2019.

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