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Withdrawn: Implementation Consultant For The Coastal Protection For Climate Change Adaptation In The Small Island States In The Caribbean Project

The Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre wishes to withdraw the pre-qualification notice for an Implementation Consultant under the Coastal Protection for Climate Change Adaptation in the Small Island States in the Caribbean project, which is funded by the German Development Bank (KfW). The Request For Proposals will be re-advertise at a later date.

Please direct queries to:

Dr Kenrick Leslie
Executive Director
Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre
Attn: Ms. Allison Williams, Ag. Procurement Officer
Second Floor Lawrence Nicholas Building Ring Road
P. O. Box 563
Belmopan, Belize
Tel:  501-822-1094, 822-1104
Fax:  501-822-1365
E-mail:   awilliams@caribbeanclimate.bz

Up-scaling finance for community-based adaptation

A new review paper entitled ‘Up-scaling finance for community-based adaptationis now available.  Published in the academic journal Climate and Development, the paper is available free of charge as part of a special issue entitled ‘Community-based adaptation: Mainstreaming into national and local planning’.

The paper explores ways in which community-based adaptation is presently being mainstreamed through the multilateral funds that are used to channel adaptation finance under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and points to two promising examples that demonstrate this.

According to Dr Adrian Fenton, a researcher at the University of Leeds and one of the authors of the paper, “at a time when climate change negotiations are focused on achieving a new global agreement by 2015 and financial commitments are to be scaled up to US$100 billion by 2020, now is time to ensure that an appropriate amount of finance reaches communities and allow them to implement urgently needed adaptation activities”.

This article is the result of a collaboration between academic researchers and practitioners spanning seven institutions and organisations in the field of climate finance.

Follow Dr Fenton via @AdrianFenton2

Global Governance: The Intersection of Human Security and Justice

The Hague Institute for Global Justice and The Stimson Center are co-hosting a breakfast Expert Consultation on “Global Governance: The Intersection of Human Security and Justice” on 9 December 2014 from 08:00am – 10am at the Ausan Gate Meeting Room, Hilton Lima Miraflores in Peru, in connection with the work of the Commission on Global Security, Justice, and Governance.

The Commission is composed of a select group of eminent statespersons and public intellectuals and co-chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and former Foreign Minister of Nigeria Professor Ibrahim A. Gambari. A chief goal of the Commission is to issue, in June 2015, a focused set of global policy and institutional reform recommendations in advance of the September 2015 United Nations’ 70th Anniversary Summit in New York and the December 2015 Paris Climate Change Conference.

In addition to seeking expert views from Lima Climate Change Conference participants, the consultation will present research findings from four background papers on climate governance and technological responses. For your reference, we have attached the consultation program (which will include breakfast). The expert consultation will be chaired by Commissioner Mrs. Erna Witoelar (Founder of the Indonesian Environmental Forum and Former UN Special Ambassador for the MDGs).

In addition to the onsite Consultation, The Hague Institute and the Stimson  will be facilitating a the second E-consultation for the ‘Climate & People’ research track of the Commission on Global Security, Justice and Governance from January 12th to February 13th 2015.  The online consultation serves as a forum for climate governance experts to respond to and provide inputs for thought-provoking ideas for climate governance reform which will be presented to the Commission for consideration.

Climate governance experts are invited  to register for both consultations. Additional information can be requested from Ms. Manuella Appiah (m.appiah@thehagueinstitute.org).

E-Learning Course: Investment Planning Towards Low Carbon Climate Resilient Development

E-Learning Course 
Investment Planning Towards Low Carbon Climate Resilient Development

Last date to apply – November 17, 2014
Course Delivery Dates: December 1 – 12, 2014

http://einstitute.worldbank.org/ei/course/investment-planning-toward-low-emission-development

Introduction:
The course compiles knowledge and lessons learned during the design phase of the Climate Investment Funds (CIF) investment plans and strategic programs.

The objective of this course is to teach policy-makers, planners and climate change practitioners how to design and finance strategic plans and programs for low carbon and climate resilient development that go beyond a project-by-project approach.

Note: Preference will be given to (in the following order):

(i) national-level government policy-makers, planners and practitioners working in the fields of clean energy, sustainable transportation, energy efficiency, and climate change from the 14 countries invited to prepare SREP investment plans (Bangladesh, Benin, Cambodia, Ghana, Haiti, Kiribati, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Nicaragua, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Uganda, Zambia);

(ii) national-level government policy-makers, planners and practitioners working in the fields of clean energy, sustainable transportation, energy efficiency, and climate change from other developing countries; and

(iii) practitioners from development organizations or other institutions supporting countries in this work

Learning objectives:

  • Preparing an overall investment strategy to meet climate change objectives
  • Identifying envelopes of investments to meet those objectives, focusing on sectoral issues (energy, transport, forestry and land-use change)
  • Estimating real costs of investments and identifying sources of finance
  • Selecting and setting up the appropriate financial instruments
  • Involving the private sector to scale-up action
  • Undertaking the appropriate underlying technical, economic and financial analyses
  • Launching a national dialogue to shape the plan and ensure public participation
  • Addressing social issues, including gender
  • Managing results, monitoring and evaluation.

For Queries Contact:
Ms. Chandni Dinakaran at cdinakaran@worldbank.org

Link to Course Website and Application:

http://einstitute.worldbank.org/ei/course/investment-planning-toward-low-emission-development

Climate Policy Initiative

Here’s a round-up of activities by the Climate Policy Initiative that are useful in the leap up to COP.

Interactive Report & Webinar: Moving to a Low-Carbon Economy Could Free up Trillions

Some worry that a switch away from fossil fuels could have a significant cost to the global economy and undermine the financial system. New research conducted by CPI for the New Climate Economy project demonstrates that with the right policies, a transition to a low-carbon energy system could free up trillions of dollars over the next 20 years to invest in better economic growth.

Read the interactive report HERE.

Join the webinar on November 21st to learn how moving to a low-carbon economy can free up trillions.

New Animated Video: New Models for a Low-Carbon Electricity System

New finance and business models for a low-carbon electricity system in the U.S. and Europe can save consumers, investors, and taxpayers billions. To create a clean and low-cost electricity system at scale, each of the main business segments of the existing electricity industry will need to evolve.

Watch the video:

Webinar: First Peek at the Global Landscape of Climate Finance 2014

The Global Landscape of Climate Finance is the most comprehensive overview of global climate finance flows available. It has been cited widely and served as the basis for the 2014 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group 3 report chapter on climate finance.

Join the webinar November 20th to be the first to hear details from the latest assessment.

Understanding the Energy-Water Nexus

Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) recently released the publication ‘Understanding the Energy-Water Nexus’ that can be downloaded at http://www.ecn.nl/docs/library/report/2014/e14046.pdf. Why is it important? Climate change is a global problem, and one of the main challenges facing mankind this century. Climate change is driven mainly by energy use and land use changes, but at … Continue reading

US and China strike deal on carbon cuts in push for global climate change pact

Barack Obama aims for reduction of a quarter or more by 2025, while Xi Jinping sets goal for emissions to fall after 2030 The United States and China have unveiled a secretly negotiated deal to reduce their greenhouse gas output, with China agreeing to cap emissions for the first time and the US committing to … Continue reading

Saint Lucian fishermen peg hopes on common fisheries policy

Fisherman John Francis, 60, prepares to head to sea in his boat. THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION/Alison Kentish

John Francis was just 17 when he began fishing more than four decades ago. But these days, the 60-year-old fisherman from Praslin, on the east coast of the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia, finds it hard to make a living.

“There used to be money in fishing. In the 70s, 80s and 90s I used to catch 500-600 pounds (230-270 kg) of fish a day,” he said. Now, “things have changed. These days I am lucky if I catch 500 pounds of fish in two weeks.”

Just as worrying, “the sea is different. I cannot explain it, but it looks like there are less and less fish, warmer temperatures and really bad storms,” he said.

He and other fishermen hit by over-fishing and climate change may soon win some relief, however, as a result of a common fisheries policy negotiated by ministers from 15 Caribbean countries to better conserve and manage the remaining fish.

The hard-won policy, announced last month, follows 10 years of negotiations by the Belize-based Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM).

Milton Houghton, the CRFM’s executive director, says the policy should aid sustainable management of the region’s over-exploited fisheries, improve food security and reduce poverty.

The policy “heralds a new era in cooperation in the conservation, management and use of marine resources,” he said.

The policy will establish a common fishing zone while allowing member states to retain management of their territorial seas. It also improves arrangements for the management of fish stocks in the Caribbean, which are presently not subject to any management regime.

For the fishermen of Saint Lucia, this could mean they will have access to greater fish reserves and a wider fishing area, albeit one with strict conservation and management measures.

Climate Change Impacts

Albert George, a 56-year-old fisherman, says he is happy that governments in the Caribbean are finally paying attention to the fishing, which he considers a crucial business, behind only agriculture in importance.

George hopes the new policy will protect fish stocks and help fishermen across the island cope with the effects of climate change, which he says have made it hard for him to make ends meet.

“The changes are everywhere,” George said. “I see the difference in the sea level and wind currents. Every year we fear the hurricane season because the storms are getting worse.

“We live on the coast and feed our families from the sea, and these days we can barely afford to send our children to school. We do not catch the amount of fish that we used to five years ago,” he said.

According to George, each fishing trip requires 1,000 East Caribbean dollars ($370) worth of fuel, but he often returns with a catch worth less than 10 percent of the fuel cost.

Changing Fish Ranges

Marine biologist Susan Singh-Renton, who served as the scientific advisor to the 15-nation CARICOM for over two decades and is now deputy executive director of the CRFM, said Caribbean fisheries face a range of pressures, including changes in the range of some fish.

“There are many challenges. Large fish such as dolphin, kingfish and tuna are being affected,” she said. “With the warming of sea water, the natural range of the fish becomes extended and they are able to move away; they are moving northward.”

For the past two years, the fishers’ problems have been exacerbated by the proliferation of an invasive species, lion fish, in Caribbean waters. Saint Lucia, Barbados and the Bahamas have eradication programmes in place.

“Sometimes we realise that our fish pots are filled, only to raise them and discover that out of 100 pounds of fish, the lion fish makes up 70-80 pounds. People are afraid of that fish and it is taking over our waters. Soon, we will not have any other fish left,” said Jeannette Francis, a fisherman unrelated to John Francis.

Despite regional efforts to encourage Caribbean people to view lion fish as a food, fishermen say it is a hard sell to those who have preferred tuna, dolphin and shellfish for decades.

According to data provided by the CRFM, the fisheries sector provides direct employment for 338,000 people in the region, generating $251 million in revenue annually.

Those involved in fishing in Saint Lucia are cautiously optimistic that the new policy will produce results – but some say they need to wait and see.

“We have had it with the talk. We just want action. We want to see people who can make things better actually do that for us,” said Margaret Jn Baptiste, 56, who has been fishing since she was 16.

“I believe it is always good when countries in the Caribbean come together to deal with a situation, but there is too much talk. We want to see the difference. They do not understand that our lives depend on this.”

Credit: Reuters News

Belize Fights to Save a Crucial Barrier Reef

The humble CREWS buoy hosts several instruments designed to measure conditions above and below the water, and keep track of these developing threats. Credit: Aaron Humes/IPS

The humble CREWS buoy hosts several instruments designed to measure conditions above and below the water, and keep track of these developing threats. Credit: Aaron Humes/IPS

Home to the second longest barrier reef in the world and the largest in the Western Hemisphere, which provides jobs in fishing, tourism and other industries which feed the lifeblood of the economy, Belize has long been acutely aware of the need to protect its marine resources from both human and natural activities.

However, there has been a recent decline in the production and export of marine products including conch, lobster, and fish, even as tourism figures continue to increase.

“What happens on the land will eventually reach the sea, via our rivers.” — Dr. Kenrick Leslie

The decline is not helped by overfishing and the harvest of immature conch and lobster outside of the standard fishing season. But the primary reason for less conch and lobster in Belize’s waters, according to local experts, is excess ocean acidity which is making it difficult for popular crustacean species such as conch and lobster, which depend on their hard, spiny shells to survive, to grow and mature.

According to the executive director of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (CCCCC), Dr. Kenrick Leslie, acidification is as important and as detrimental to the sustainability of the Barrier Reef and the ocean generally as warming of the atmosphere and other factors generally associated with climate change.

Carbon dioxide which is emitted in the atmosphere from greenhouse gases is absorbed into the ocean as carbonic acid, which interacts with the calcium present in the shells of conch and lobster to form calcium carbonate, dissolving those shells and reducing their numbers. Belize also faces continuous difficulties with coral bleaching, which has attacked several key sections of the reef in recent years.

Dr. Leslie told IPS that activities on Belize’s terrestrial land mass are also contributing to the problems under Belize’s waters. “What happens on the land will eventually reach the sea, via our rivers,” he noted.

To fight these new problems, there is need for more research and accurate, up to the minute data.

Last month, the European Union (EU), as part of its Global Climate Change Alliance Caribbean Support Project handed over to the government of Belize and specifically the Ministry of Forestry, Fisheries and Sustainable Development for its continued usage a Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) buoy based at South Water Caye off the Stann Creek District in southern Belize.

Developed by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), it has been adopted by the CCCCC as a centrepiece of the effort to obtain reliable data as a basis for strategies for fighting climate change.

Dr. Leslie says the CREWS system represents a leap forward in research technology on climate change. The humble buoy hosts several instruments designed to measure conditions above and below the water, and keep track of these developing threats. The data collected on atmospheric and oceanic conditions such as oceanic turbidity, levels of carbon dioxide and other harmful elements and others are monitored from the Centre’s office in Belmopan and the data sent along to international scientists who can more concretely analyse it.

The South Water Caye CREWS station is one of two in Belize; the other is located at the University of Belize’s Environmental Research Institute (ERI) on Calabash Caye in the Turneffe Atoll range. Other stations are located in Jamaica, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Dominican Republic, with more planned in other key areas.

According to the CEO of the Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute (CZMAI), Vincent Gillet, this is an example of the kind of work that needs to be done to keep the coastal zone healthy and safeguard resources for Belize’s future generations.

A report released at the start of Coastal Awareness Week in Belize City urges greater awareness of the effects of climate change and the participation of the local managers of the coastal zone in a policy to combat those effects. Several recommendations were made, including empowering the Authority with more legislative heft, revising the land distribution policy and bringing more people into the discussion.

The report was the work of over 30 local and international scientists who contributed to and prepared it.

In receiving the CREWS equipment, the Ministry’s CEO, Dr. Adele Catzim-Sanchez, sought to remind that the problem of climate change is real and unless it is addressed, Belizeans may be contributing to their own demise.

The European Union’s Ambassador to Belize, Paola Amadei, reported that the Union may soon be able to offer even more help with the planned negotiations in Paris, France, in 2015 for a global initiative on climate change, with emphasis on smaller states. Belize already benefits from separate but concurrent projects, the latter of which aims to give Belize a sustainable development plan and specific strategy to address climate change.

In addition, Dr. Leslie is pushing for even more monitoring equipment, including current metres to study the effect of terrestrial activity such as mining and construction material gathering as well as deforestation on the sea, where the residue of such activities inevitably ends up.

Credit: IPS News Agency

Grenadian Youngsters Raise Awareness About Climate Change (Video)

  How to raise awareness about the effects of climate change, particularly amongst the youth? Grenada might have found the answer! On Wednesday, 15th October, the Grenada Ministry of Agriculture, Lands, Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment, in conjunction with the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) unveiled a recently produced music video which will champion … Continue reading

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